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We Need To Talk About Kevin (Five Star Paperback) [Paperback]

Lionel Shriver , Kate Mosse
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (663 customer reviews)

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We Need To Talk About Kevin (Serpent's Tail Classics) We Need To Talk About Kevin (Serpent's Tail Classics) 4.2 out of 5 stars (663)
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Book Description

9 May 2006 Five Star Paperback
WINNER OF THE ORANGE PRIZE FOR FICTION 2005 Two years ago, Eva Khatchadourian?s son, Kevin, murdered seven of his fellow high-school students, a cafeteria worker, and a popular algebra teacher. Because he was only fifteen at the time of the killings, he received a lenient sentence and is now in a prison for young offenders in upstate New York. Telling the story of Kevin's upbringing, Eva addresses herself to her estranged husband through a series of letters. Fearing that her own shortcomings may have shaped what her son has become, she confesses to a deep, long-standing ambivalence about both motherhood in general and Kevin in particular. How much is her fault? Lionel Shriver tells a compelling, absorbing, and resonant story while framing these horrifying tableaux of teenage carnage as metaphors for the larger tragedy - the tragedy of a country where everything works, nobody starves, and anything can be bought but a sense of purpose.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 500 pages
  • Publisher: Serpent's Tail (9 May 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852424672
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852424671
  • Product Dimensions: 19.2 x 12.4 x 3.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (663 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 191,502 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Lionel Shriver's novels include The Post-Birthday World, We Need to Talk About Kevin, and A Perfectly Good Family. Her writing has appeared in The Guardian, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and many other publications. She lives in London.

Product Description

Review

In fact everybody needs to talk about Kevin. Once in a while, a stunningly powerful novel comes along, knocks you sideways and takes your breath away: this is it... a horrifying, original, witty, brave and deliberately provocative investigation into all the casual assumptions we make about family life, and motherhood in particular (Daily Mail)

This superb, many-layered novel intelligently weighs the culpability of parental nurture against the nightmarish possibilities of an innately evil child (Daily Telegraph 2006-05-06)

Urgent, unblinking and articulate fiction (Sunday Times 2006-05-07)

Cleverly balances the grand guignol and the mundane (Guardian 2006-05-06)

Shriver keeps up an almost unbearable suspense It's hard to imagine a more striking demolition job on the American myth of the perfect suburban family (The Sunday Telegraph 2006-05-21)

A study of despair, a book of ideas and a deconstruction of modern American morality (David Baddiel The Times)

One of my favourite novels... the best thing I've read in years (Jeremy Vine London Magazine)

Book Description

The Orange prize winning, million copy bestseller: now a Serpent's Tail classic, with a new foreword by Kate Mosse --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
76 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Description of Clinical Psychopathy in a Child 30 July 2007
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Schriver is frequently slated for writing a book about motherhood when she is childless. In slating Schriver and in condemning Eva (Kevin's mother) reviewers overlook the fact that Kevin scores highly on the Cleckley checklist used to identify clinical psychopathy and Eva also alludes to all 3 of the classic triad of childhood indicators of psychopathy. She's done her homework in this respect. Kevin evades diagnosis (there is a great unwillingness to diagnose psychopathy in children) and the family are left to flounder with a child whose behaviour cannot be modified with either reward or punishment.

As a mother, Eva blames herself for not bonding with a son who is incapable of bonding or, indeed, of forming normal relationships. She does her best to understand and cope with his aberrant behaviour, but faced with her husband's refusal to acknowlege the problem and his inability to see through Kevin's play-acting, she is out-manoeuvred by her own son. Through it all she loves her son as best she can, but his inability to respond in a normal fashion stymies her attempts to mitigate his behavioural and deep psychological problems.

It takes a while to get into the book, but as the story progresses, it becomes hard to put it down. The real reason for Eva's estrangement from husband and daughter is a twist I didn't see coming until a few pages from it. The final scene, however, seems out of place.
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96 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gripping story 19 Jun 2007
Format:Paperback
This book is very well written. Contrary to other reviews of this book, I think it is a strength in the novel that Eva does not always inspire empathy in the reader. Eva is a terrifically well rounded, believable and flawed character. The book is in the form of letters to her husband trying to rationalise the tragic killings performed by her son. I think it is in trying to rationalise why Kevin committed such atrocities that Eva questions her role as a mother... is it because she didn't really want a baby, because she couldn't bond with Kevin after he was born, because she wanted a career or was Kevin just born inherently evil?

This book is gripping from beginning to end, thought provoking, funny, scary and sad... well worth a read.
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102 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating food for thought 14 Oct 2005
Format:Paperback
I read this book after a review piqued my interest and I wasn't disappointed. This is a portrait of a family tearing itself apart, because the parents have a diametrically opposite view of what children, parenting and family are all about.
While Franklin holds the idea of family up as a holy grail, the highest purpose that anyone can have, Eva regards family as being something that you do aswell as everything else rather than a calling.
I was very surprised at the harsh judgement Eva received from reviewers - it's true that Eva's view may not be entirely unbiased, and her actions less than perfect, but she is a human being after all. Being a mother does not make you perfect, as Loretta Greenleaf says. As a woman I found that her feelings, particularly her anxieties during pregnancy, seemed to echo my own worst fears: that her body ceases to be her own, that others will regard her as a vessel for the precious offspring rather than a person in her own right. Except in Eva's case these are realities and not just fears.
We can't help our feelings and though Eva's feelings towards her child may not always be the best desirable, she tries hard to fight against them. She doesn't actively mistreat Kevin, except on the one occasion when she loses her temper - something that many parents understandably do.
I was equally surprised by the fact most people seemed uncondemnatory of Franklin, who seemed to me to share equal guilt over the sad state of affairs. His attitude towards his wife both before, during, and immediately after her pregnancy is astounding in its callousness and inflexibility.
His Holy Grail attitude to family seems to rely on his wife totally sublimating herself and her life to the cause of 'the family' while he continues as normal.
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75 of 82 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A complex , frightening and ambiguous creation 8 Sep 2005
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I won't retell the story; it is well known by now.
I have read it twice and think it is one of the most astonishing modern novels I have read. I want all my friends to read it so we can discuss it.
On first reading I thought it powerful and affecting. What makes a good-enough parent? There but for the grace of God etc. I also thought it had its faults; the opposition between Eva and her husband and between Kevin and Celia are a little too schematic.
A second reading revealed greater complexities. We only have Eva's perspective and Eva is clever and clear-sighted but also vain, selfish and judgemental. She is distinctly childish in her relationship with her husband, looking to him to provide an anchor while she goes off to explore the world (her own mother was emotionally absent). And, ccording to her account, her judgement is, in a twisted sort of way, vindicated. Yes, we now know that Kevin is a monster and she was a bad mother. And seeing things clearly, being smart is very important to Eva.
Once I began to question Eva's view, I saw clues scattered through the book that, far from being born a monster, Kevin was a child largely formed by his mother's antipathy towards him that started before he was even born. The account of the apathetic and joyless toddler is deeply sad. Why did she not seek help? When he is ill, she recognises that Kevin's indifference requires huge effort to maintain so why does she think he needed to do it? Did she think that no psychiatrist or psychologist was clever enough to teach her anything? She frequently criticises Kevin for things that are frankly minor - eating before going to a restaurant, for example, which would matter less if she were ever positive.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting
The book is much better than the film. Very thought provoking, makes you think about the nature/ nurture debate.
Published 5 hours ago by Birdie
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
heavy going and quite disturbing
Published 9 days ago by Gareth Wilson
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Brilliant and fast delivery
Published 9 days ago by Maureen Kernaghan
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably not the best book to read if you want to have children
Probably not the best book to read if you want to have children! It is superb though, very thought invoking.
Published 9 days ago by Fiona Heavey
4.0 out of 5 stars An uncomfortable read, but worthwhile.
This book follows Eva and her struggle with son Kevin, from before he is born to after he has killed people at his school. Read more
Published 14 days ago by J C Mitchinson
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read but slow
I was recommended this and found it quite slow to get into, predictable in places but an interesting read, you can't help but somehow feel sorry for the mother yet cold towards her... Read more
Published 15 days ago by Anneka Pycroft
3.0 out of 5 stars An upsetting read
I found the book difficult to get into but kept going to the end. It's obviously a very disturbing story and I would have liked more of an explanation for his behaviour.
Published 17 days ago by Mrs Rachel S Dodge
4.0 out of 5 stars Well written
A well written and eye opening account of human nature which tackles many taboos in an honest and unforgiving way
Published 19 days ago by lou
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstandingly emotional
Quite simply one of the best books I have read, ever. The story, the language, and the strength of characterisation were all just so compelling.
Published 20 days ago by Lord_Gargoyle
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!!!! Five stars not enough
Everyone in the world should read this book. Read, before you watch the film. Insight in to the fact that you never really know what is going on in the heads of the people we all... Read more
Published 24 days ago by Bob
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