Necessary Evil: The Milkweed Triptych: Book Three and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Necessary Evil: The Milkw... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Necessary Evil: The Milkweed Triptych: Book Three Paperback – 30 Apr 2013

16 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£0.49 £0.01
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.

Frequently Bought Together

Necessary Evil: The Milkweed Triptych: Book Three + The Coldest War (Milkweed Triptych) + Bitter Seeds (Milkweed Triptych)
Price For All Three: £25.97

Buy the selected items together


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (30 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 035650171X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0356501710
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 3.2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 208,845 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ian Tregillis is the son of a bearded mountebank and a discredited tarot card reader. He was born and raised in Minnesota, where his parents had landed after fleeing the wrath of a Flemish prince. (The full story, he's told, involves a Dutch tramp steamer and a stolen horse.) Nowadays he lives in New Mexico, where he consorts with writers, scientists and other unsavoury types.

Product Description

Review

One hell of a read (Buzzfeed)

Ian Tregillis triumphantly concludes his astonishing, brilliant, pulse-pounding debut trilogy . . . a book that veers precipitously from unexpected and chilling ruminations on the inherent evil of precognition; to the questions of loyalty and betrayal so thorny that they need a time-travel loop to really be explored; to spy-thriller action sequences that will keep you up under the covers with a flashlight, turning pages and unable to sleep. This is a remarkable set of books, and with all three in hand, would make a fabulous spring read (Cory Doctorow BOING BOING)

Darkly fascinating . . . A thoroughly satisfying conclusion to an imaginative tour de force (KIRKUS REVIEWS)

Tregillis' conclusion of the Milkweed Triptych is the pièce de résistance of the series. Necessary Evil is a perfect marriage of science fiction, fantasy and alternate history. His narrative flows seamlessly, and his plot is fantastically convincing. Tregillis' characters astound, the villains as well as the heroes, especially honorable, tormented yet heroic Raybould (RT BOOK REVIEWS)

Book Description

Superhumans and dark magic collide in secret supernatural history of Twentieth Century events - the final book in this landmark series

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steve D on 4 May 2013
Format: Paperback
This book picks up immediately after its predecessor, The Coldest War, ended, so it's a little hard to comment on the story without dropping major spoilers. The Amazon blurb gives more than enough away. Put simply, if you've read the first two books, then you know what happened and you have expectations as to where this will lead and - by and large - you won't be disappointed. If you haven't read the first two, stop reading this and go and look up Bitter Seeds instead.

I thought this final instalment actually took a while to get going. The pacing of the first half of the novel is very deliberate, concentrating - as per the previous book - very much on the characters. Tregillis has also chosen to write parts of the book in the first person. It's an interesting stylistic choice and - for very spoilery reasons - I can't explain why but, although I found the switches between first and third person quite jarring at first, there is a very good reason for it, and it made a lot of sense once I got to grips with it.

I absolutely loved the previous book. The fact is, I guess, that this one was always going to struggle to live up to the standards set by its predecessor. It's got that tricky job to do of balancing character, action, plot and at the same time tie up all of the loose ends. Overall, I think it does a good job. I turned the final page, read the final line, and felt quite satisfied with the conclusion. But there were a couple of aspects of this final book that I felt could have been better. For a couple of reasons it perhaps lacks the dynamics of the previous books, which were told from the viewpoints of both English and German characters.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michel Nita on 7 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you've come this far with Raybould & Gretel then you need no more reason than that to read this book.
With a mixed bag of feelings did I close this final tome. None of them reflecting negatively on the book itself, rather it's the scope of the punch packed into the final chapters that makes me say this.
Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
See my review of this book, and many more, at TalesfromtheGreatEastRoad.wordpress.com

(Spoilers for the first two books in the series.)

To be given the chance to undo the mistakes of his past, to not only change the fate of his family but also save the world, Raybould Marsh has agreed to trust his most despised enemy. Gretel is one of the few living genetic experiments created by the mad Dr Von Westarp, who were used as soldiers during the Second World War. She can see the future, and has used her powers to kill Marsh's infant daughter once already. But the only wait to save his baby, and everyone else, is to trust Gretel. As the Eidolons - a race of god-like beings who abhor humans - destroy the world Gretel is able to send Marsh back in time from 1963 to 1940 in order to save this time line from destruction and redeem himself.

Necessary Evil is a very bittersweet book. After seeing Marsh become a shadow of the man he used to be in the last book, The Coldest War, he is given a chance to change history - but for a different version of himself. He gets to see his wife, when she still loved him, and his baby daughter, who has been dead for nearly twenty years, but can't reveal who he truly is. Marsh's pain and loneliness is visible throughout the novel, and heart-wrenching to read.

The comparisons between Old Marsh and Young Marsh is interesting to read. Both are obviously stubborn and determined to protect their family, but Old Marsh has become better at scheming and manipulating people: more willing to do the "necessary evil" in order to reach his goals. His loneliness has hardened him, and the possibility of saving his child has made him desperate. Yet, despite these faults, Old Marsh is a constantly sympathetic character.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By D. Harris TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 May 2013
Format: Paperback
This is the third in a "tripytch" of books, after Bitter Seeds and The Coldest War. It's appropriately called a "triptych" not a "trilogy" - a triptych is a picture in three parts, while a trilogy is just three successive books. If you've read to the end of the second book, you might have started to guess why and I will be discussing this in a moment, so if you want to avoid spoilers for the first two books, go away and do something else now (ideally, read those first two books).

If you're still with me, "Necessary Evil" follows Raybould Marsh back from the 1963 of "Coldest war" back to the dark days of 1940. Marsh is a British secret agent and part of the unconventional "Milkweed" organisation, whose job is to conjure up demons to fight the Queen's enemies. But Milkweed has been played, and in '63 the demons break loose to eat the world. Marsh takes a desperate course of action, returning to the Second World War to prevent that. Marsh has also been played by Gretel, one of a secret cadre of German super-soldiers. Gretel can see the future - or rather possible futures - and is trying to engineer one in which the demons fail - and in which she can claim Marsh for her own. As part of this, she murdered his baby daughter (in 1940) by directing a bombing raid at the village to which she was evacuated. that's part of Marsh's motivation for returning to 1940 - not only to save the world, but to save his daughter (and to avoid the subsequent failure of his marriage).

Confused?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback