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Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind Volume 7 (Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind) Paperback – 2 Mar 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Viz Media, Subs. of Shogakukan Inc; 2nd edition (2 Mar. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591163552
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591163558
  • Product Dimensions: 18.1 x 1.5 x 25.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 394,661 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Hayao Miyazaki is the prominent director of many popular animated feature films. He is also the co-founder of Studio Ghibli, the award-winning Japanese animation studio and production company behind worldwide hits such as PRINCESS MONONOKE, HOWL'S MOVING CASTLE and SPIRITED AWAY.

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Spider Monkey HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Feb. 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The collection of 7 books that make up the Nausicaa collection are fantastic. I read them all in about two days as once you start them you cannot stop. The paper quality is a bit low, but what can you expect for the price. You get the full story, plus it has additional stuff to the film and more depth. This shows off Miyazaki's amazing drawing skills and his ability to weave a story with a message is renowned. This has strong environmental themes and manages to make a point without ramming it home. You have to read these in the traditional Japanese way (I.e. back to front from a western perspective) but this only adds to the charm and overall experience. A brilliant intro to Miyazaki's anime.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
A modern work of art 15 Nov. 2009
By J. Pang - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a review of the entire 7 volume Viz version of the Nausicaa manga, but I'm attaching it to Vol 7 because it contains many of my favorite moments. That said, it does not stand alone, and you have to read the entire series to comprehend it.

First, some context: I am not a fan of Japanese graphic novels in general, nor most Western graphic novels. The only other graphic novel that I even consider worthy of my time is Alan Moore's The Watchmen. Even with the Watchmen, I only enjoyed it on an academic level, without any real attachment. I am also a relatively late adopter of Miyazaki's anime, having started watching his movies only after the American release of Spirited Away. I have become thoroughly attached to a number of his films (Princess Mononoke and Porco Rosso, in particular), but the film version of Nausicaa is not among my favorites. While enjoyable, I found it somewhat cliche ridden, preachy, and lacking in depth (I was pleasantly surprised to read that Miyazaki had similar thoughts in later interviews, having been somewhat "forced" into the project).

Nausicaa the manga is different. This manga is one of only three or four works of literature that have made an indelible mark on me. It is what I come back to during those rainy days when I want an enjoyable escape; to meet with old characters that are like old friends. Although each character begins as a familiar archetype, they develop in ways that are at once surprising and yet remarkably natural. I don't think there is another work of fiction where I felt as emotionally attached to the characters as I did while reading Nausicaa. The plotting also has a natural meandering quality that is not calculating like most modern novels (this is probably because Miyazaki didn't plan that far ahead writing it over the course of 13 years). The story is at once a coming of age tale, a tale about journey, a war story, an adventure story, a story of political intrigue, a science fiction epic, and a treatise on a number of philosophical themes. Somehow all the various threads and themes climax together brilliantly to a conclusion that is at once thrilling, emotionally satisfying, deeply thought provoking, and perfectly placed.

Nausicaa is also what I return to when I want to think deeply about ecology, religion, war and peace, life and death, or any of the other themes that permeate Nausicaa. That is not to say that Miyazaki has anything incredibly novel to contribute to the volumes of philosophy and treatises that came before him. But Nausicaa captures the essence of so many of those debates while weaving them into the core of a thoroughly "human" story. It does so in such an effortless way, that I feel I can relate those deep questions again in a very intimate way, rather than the distant appreciation I feel after reading through deeper academic texts. Nausicaa inspires deep thoughts and makes me enjoy thinking them like no other work of art has. More than any of his films, I feel that Nausicaa gives a window into Miyazaki's mind, how he (and a generation of idealists) thought, and how his thinking changed over the course of a decade (e.g., how he made the transition from the simple pro-environment message in the Nausicaa film to the much more nuanced message in Mononoke). I've read other works that are more intellectually complete, but Nausicaa is unique in that it thoroughly de-abstracts deep philosophical issues and connects you to them in a very emotional way.

Finally, Nausicaa is what I return to when I just want to stare at beautiful sketches. Like his movies, the characters, animals, and fantastical settings seem to leap out from Miyazaki's mind directly to the page, but here they are more raw, unfiltered. The sketch work in some frames is so remarkably detailed, that each one could be a standalone print. Moreover, Miyazaki is a visual story teller with few equals, and despite the nuance and detail in each frame, not one stroke is extraneous; I sometimes stare at individual frames for countless minutes because even the ones without dialog could tell paragraphs and paragraphs of the story on their own.

Now, a note on Vol 7 in particular. Some people disparage the ending as antithetical to Nausicaa's character; that she becomes a "destroyer" in the end rather than the "lover of life" that she starts off as. In a technical sense, this is true. But she does so in response to an impossible moral dilemma, very loosely paraphrased as "Is it justified to use life as a means to an end, if that end is paradise?" This is a deeply, deeply philosophical question for which an answer eludes us to this day. It is also a metaphor for many of the seismic events that shaped the last 3 decades, such as the collapse of Communism. In the end, Nausicaa must choose between the abstract lives of a utopian future and the lives of humans and creatures that exist in the here and now, along with the suffering and misery that accompany them. It is a harsh, nuanced, and ambiguous ending that is a far cry from the simplistic Nausicaa film. That this particular volume is so chock full of allegories, metaphors, and philosophical quandaries (all seamlessly integrated with a thrilling climax) is one of the reasons why it is my favorite. (Volume 5 and 6 are close seconds with their emotionally gripping examination of death, the meaning of life, and nihilism)

In short, when you find that you have a full weekend to read something deep and satisfying (because you may just decide to read the whole thing in one sitting), try Nausicaa. The first two volumes are a bit slow. But the series grows on you like none other.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Miyazaki at his finest...the movie doesn't even come close 14 Mar. 2010
By Shannon B. Rankin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all, let me say that I am a huge fan of Hayao Miyazaki, and of all the Studio Ghibli films. I have all of his movies, and Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind is one of my favorite Miyazaki films, having been introduced to it soon after Disney dubbed it into English. I have watched the movie both in English and its original Japanese many times, but despite my love of the movie, it took me a long time to make up my mind to finally read the entirety of Miyazaki's manga form of Nausicaa's story.
Second of all, this review is over all seven volumes of the manga, rather than dissecting them separately. Nausicaa is more like a very long book with seven chapters, rather than separate stories, and in my opinion it is best understood and appreciated when it is read as a whole.
That being said, I cannot praise Miyazaki highly enough for giving me the rest of Nausicaa's story. The movie is only a crude telling of the first two volumes, in which Nausicca strives to understand the purpose of the Ohmu and the Sea of Corruption. The movie also introduces several of the key characters of the manga that, in further volumes, grow so much in development, such as Kushana and Kuratowa, or Asbel, and even the God Warrior. Like Nausicaa, their representation in the movie is just a small idea of their roles and characters in the full story. In particular, Kushana is NOT the villian that the movie makes her out to be, but one of the most interesting and layered characters. Nausicaa herself grows so much, and her maturation into a young woman and leader is wonderful to watch.
I cannot stress the fact that the movie, although still one of my favorite Ghibli films, falls extremely short of the full story, and it was such a joy to read the conclusion of Nausicca's journey to understand, and ultimately save, the decaying world around her. There is so much to learn and love from the manga, so much that is missing from the movie, including some of the very best characters, such as Ketcha, Chikuku, Charuka, or Selm (my particular favorite). As for the manga itself, the art is, as it is Miyazaki, absolutely flawless, and the story is detailed and riveting, both working together to create an addicting read that will not allow you to put it down once you pick it up. I myself read all seven volumes in several days, and was regretful to put the seventh down when I was done. This is a story of hope and strife, of love and pain, of death and salvation and acceptance, all woven together with the clear warning against misusing the Earth, and to live in harmony with not only the land but the people and creatures which inhabit it. Without saying too much about the story, it is a very complex war epic of man vs. nature, man vs. machine, and man vs. man, culminating in a moving realization that hints at the creation of Princess Mononoke only a few years later.
In short, this manga is a must-read for any fan of Miyazaki, Studio Ghibli, anime, manga, epics, or great storytelling in general. For Miyazaki fans, I urge you not to overly compare the movie and the manga, and don't judge the movie too harshly afterward, as it is still a wonderful epic in its own right. As for Miyazaki fans who have never read manga before, do not be afraid of the right-to-left reading; you will get used to it and forget about it quickly, like watching Japanese with English subtitles. That was my one worry before reading Nausicaa - the backward reading - but now I simply feel foolish for not reading it much, much sooner. The decision to read these seven remarkable volumes is one you won't regret. I know I don't.
In conclusion, this is Miyazaki's true masterpiece, and I challenge any supposed "fan" of Miyazaki to read this work, because you don't know Nausicca until you read her full story, and once you do, you will love her all the more because of it. If I could give it six stars, I would.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Nausicaa 8 Jan. 2011
By Spider Monkey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The collection of 7 books that make up the Nausicaa collection are fantastic. I read them all in about two days as once you start them you cannot stop. The paper quality is a bit low, but what can you expect for the price. You get the full story, plus it has additional stuff to the film and more depth. This shows off Miyazaki's amazing drawing skills and his ability to weave a story with a message is renowned. This has strong environmental themes and manages to make a point without ramming it home. You have to read these in the traditional Japanese way (I.e. back to front from a western perspective) but this only adds to the charm and overall experience. A brilliant intro to Miyazaki's anime.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
you are easily one of the best men to work in Japanese ... 1 Oct. 2014
By Lee Alan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ah, Miyazaki, you are easily one of the best men to work in Japanese animation, well, ever. However, it is equally surprising that he is just as good at making manga, though he protests he isn't. This manga, Nausicaa of The Valley of The Wind, was also later adapted into a film, though it only really covered books one through two. The scope and character development here is obviously much, much more expansive.

The tale that we are told is one of the few environmental stories that actually manage to get a message and good story across. Hell, it's not just a good story, it's a bloody epic that's scale is comparable to that of Lord of The Rings. The characters are all memorable, even if they are minor. From Abel to Chikuku to Nausica herself, they're all very well written and interesting.

In particular, I think Nausica and Kushana deserve special attention. Miyayazki isn't a stranger when it comes to writing female protagonists, but there's something about Nausicaa that makes her stand out. She is able to be strong and determined, yet also kind and loving. She's a character who is both an adventurer and an almost motherly guide. Kushana, who starts out as a character I quickly dismissed as "bitch", becomes sympathetic and tragic as our tale progresses. Her path from heartless villain to noble commander is an enjoyable one to watch.

On the matter of the ending, which I'll discuss here since you can probably tell that I think this story is worth picking up. Also, if you're interested in buying something, why read volume seven's reviews before reading volumes one through six? The ending I've heard some think goes against Nausicaa's characters. What happens is that Nausicaa learns that humans are able to live in the polluted world due to changes made by the people's of long ago using technology. She finds this technology, and is given the chance to keep it and become the tool of a false god so that, once Earth is clean, humans can fix it to where they'll survive. She rejects this, and destroys the false god and his machine. I disagree with this being against her character as the idea is that she doesn't want humanity to impose its will upon nature and other creatures as if they are above those things. Nausicaa views all forms of life as equal, so it makes sense that she would ultimately make this decision. It also isn't the all out dooming of mankind that everyone says it is. It's more that Nausicaa has left it up to nature whether humanity deserves to survive. Humanity has just as much of a chance to evolve to become more suited to the environment as the miasma decreases as it does to just be wiped out. I would like to think that Nausicaa is thinking that we'll make it as opposed to actually be wiped out.

Now, onto the matter of the art, or, rather, the fact that is absolutely stunning. Really, the art in these books is some of the best that I have ever seen. Though, this makes sense since Miyazaki always cranks out quality stuff like that.

All in all, I would say that Nausicaa of The Valley of The Wind is an excellent manga that everyone should read at least once in their lives, even if manga isn't their cup o' tea.
Gift 19 Jan. 2013
By Sam - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I got this as a gift for my brother and he was thrilled. It covers more of the story and explains more than the movie. He couldn't put it down.
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