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Nationality:Wog: The Hounding of David Oluwale Hardcover – 7 Jun 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape Ltd; First Edition, First Printing edition (7 Jun. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224080407
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224080408
  • Product Dimensions: 14.5 x 2.3 x 22.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 270,794 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

`...painstaking research, empathetic approach and ability to weave together
a vivid...social critique...This tenderly compiled book will still make you
weep' -- The Metro

"Aspden writes compassionately of his character, weaving
information into a gripping narrative...with a novelist's skill"
-- David Dabydeen, Independent, 22 June 2007

'Aspden's meticulous work does justice to a largely forgotten case.'
-- New Statesman

'Kester Aspden's brilliant book is extremely comprehensive,
involving painstaking research. It deserves to be studied.'
-- Harmit Athwal, Institute of Race Relations

'Nationality: Wog tells the harsh reality of a period which is
often looked back on with nostalgia'
-- The Herald, 29 May 2007

'This excellent and detailed book... Makes the reader confront
difficult questions about racism, policing and the care of the mentally
ill, questions that are still with us today.' -- The Tablet

'This is a shocking and engrossing story...the book is a kind of
In Cold Blood set in Leeds.'
-- Financial Times

A brilliant, fascinating book which revives the memory of David
Oluwale and tells his story as it should be told.
-- Denise Mina

A fascinating, well-researched and chilling narrative
-- Professor David Wall, University of Leeds

`The new David Peace, we're saying.'
-- Arena

Book Description

An extraordinary 'micro-history' which exposes the beginnings of institutionalised police racism in Britain. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By E. Knowles on 13 Jun. 2007
Format: Hardcover
"leave David to me " or words to that effect struck me in the book.They are spoken by one of the two police officers convicted of assaults on David Oluwale. The use of this mans first name is incongruous given his inhumane treatment by these officers and give a glimpse of what might have been a more indepth relationship between these officers and Oluwale than one of bully and victim.

This book is not an attack on the police or other Criminal Justice agencies and public bodies,nor is it pre occupied with institutional racism.It is an account of an immigrants life in Leeds in the context of a changing police force and a changing city.The police officer Kitchin and Ellerker have become dinosaurs in the force and they know it and one has a sense of their growing sense of inadequacy and powerlessness in a changing job and city.They exert their pathetic power and control over Oluwale.

We are left with some sympathy for the officers as Aspden gives powerful accounts of their personalities and backgrounds and the lonely death of Kitchen.

That Oluwale passes through the hands of other Institutions and Authorities and no help is seemingly given is not surprising given the historical context of the book but it leads the reader to ask if much has changed since.The vulnerable and dangerous still fall through loopholes and safety nets today as revealed by subsequent enquiries into preventable murders and deaths.

Nationality Wog is so thoroughly reserached and touches on so many institutions and individuals in order to put the story into as wide a context as possible that one wonders how Aspden manages to bring all the threads together.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By V. Thirlaway on 8 Aug. 2007
Format: Hardcover
I found out about this book quite by chance, when a friend asked me to go to a reading by the author at Waterstones. I thought I should buy it so I would have a clue what it was all about. I am really glad I did. The book is not an easy read, but a fascinating one. It is a cliche I know, but I really couldn't put it down. It is much much more than a tale about one man, David Oluwale. Kester Aspden has provided an incredibly detailed social history of policing in general, and the city of Leeds in particular. I have recommended "nationality wog" to everyone I know. This is a story that really should be heard.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Anita Guy on 10 July 2007
Format: Hardcover
I have just finished reading this book and it is one of those books where you just can't put down. There were some scenarios in this book that are very difficult. In particular, the brutality that David Oluwale received at the hands of the police and authorities. Even today asylum seekers are receiving the same kind of brutality and bad treatment from different types of organisations. The years of David Oluwale's life as a homeless vagrant was the most brutal, being bullied and hounded as the title of the book says, by a supposed 'law enforcing' organisation. His death was caused through blatant racism whether people choose to admit that or not. At the time of his death in 1969 it was a year after Enoch Powell's 'Rivers of blood' speech, so tolerance for immigrants was non existant back then.
This is a story that definately needed to be told. A story of a person who is a part of our history here in Britain.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
one thing thats always in your mind when reading this book is its a true story. The description of David trying to tell a court what was happening to him is heartbreaking, One can only imagine what this poor man was feeling inside with no one to turn to or nobody to help him. The book gives a detailed unbiased account of both Mr oluwale and the officers involved and in my opinion lets the reader decide if it was murder manslaughter or accident,even if it was too late for David Oluwale I am glad at least one young police officer rather than turn a blind eye like many others did was brave enough to speak up
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By Eve 1965 on 31 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
David Oluwale was persecuted by the Leeds City Police in the 60's and let down by the system that was supposed to help him. This book needs to be read and remember David Oluwale. It is horrifice how two policemen, Sergeant Kenneth Kitching and Inspector Geoffrey Ellerker, hounded him, beat him up, urinated on him while he slept in doorways and took him into the cells beat him within an inch of his life.
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I am a Leeds lass and had never heard of this horrendous happening but maybe it's due to the fact it took place when I was very young. I have only just started reading this book but I have been told by friends that it is brilliantly written and a real eye opener.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Time the truth was told. My father called him a gentle person hounded by corrupt police and was glad they were caught .my dad resigned because of corruption.he never forgot david and told us about him
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