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"National Geographic" Satellite Atlas of the World [Hardcover]

National Geographic Society
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

28 Nov 1998 National Geographic
Combining state-of-the-art satellite imagery with National Geographic''s renowned cartography, this atlas shows Earth as you have never seen it before. Close-ups show the Earth''s terrain and habitats in three-dimensional panoramas'

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 226 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic Books (28 Nov 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0792272161
  • ISBN-13: 978-0792272168
  • Product Dimensions: 35.1 x 26.8 x 1.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,188,280 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No ordinary atlas 3 Feb 1999
By A Customer
If you are one of those who like to read atlases, reading it will be a different experience. It is not the kind of reference books in which you can find out whether city A is the capital of country Z, or that you can see comprehensive maps of every country in the world. It is not a comprehesive atlas, anyway, although it is divided into sections according to the continents of the world, but the maps are not listed country by country. The interesting things you can find in it are a great variety of images of our Earth, which are not common in common atlases. You can appreciate the beautiful of our planet in very different perspectives. The images are really beautiful! Some of the readers may be disappointed that their home towns cannot be seen in the book (but I'm lucky enough to see mine!). However, if you are a true lover of your home planet, it's a real gem for you.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What in the world... 15 Sep 2003
By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME TOP 1000 REVIEWER
As a child, I was always fascinated by maps, and fascinated by astronomy. In many ways, this book combines those fascinations in one truly remarkable text. Every page is a full-colour plate, showing satellite-produced images of the entire world in multiple respects.
The organisation of the book is basic, as any other atlas; the major sections include the World, North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, and Antarctica. In addition to these major sections, there are shorter pieces on satellites (both history of satellites and how satellites work), the future, and credits/index sections.
This is no simple book of maps. There are typical geopolitical maps, to be sure, as apart from the basic outlines, it is sometimes hard to tell what is being shown in the photographs. However, pride of place certainly belongs to the photographs, from both the visible light spectrum and non-visible (ultra-high and -low) spectrums. These show geological topography, physical features, vegetation, climate, oceans, population, constructed/built-up features, and more.
With regard to the oceans, there are different types of satellite images which show temperature variations, depth, underwater vegetation, geological fault lines, and even pollution. There is a fascinating section showing the seasonal variations of ocean temperature and motion due to El Nino effects.
Similarly, with population and developed areas, it is mesmerising to see the differences and similarities across the various continents. Cities look very much the same in many respects from space in the distant view; the dominant characteristics at ranges that cover tens of miles is often the contours and geological/natural formations that surround a city.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
I came accross this book at a large retail bookstore outlet called Borders. I found myself enthralled in it for at least 30 minutes before I realized I should be heading for the doors before closing. I was could have purchased the book then and there, but I wanted to see the price difference here at Amazon.com. Sure enough it was a better buy at Amazon. I say get this book and leave it out where people can flip through and enjoy it to it's fullest.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No ordinary atlas 3 Feb 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
If you are one of those who like to read atlases, reading it will be a different experience. It is not the kind of reference books in which you can find out whether city A is the capital of country Z, or that you can see comprehensive maps of every country in the world. It is not a comprehesive atlas, anyway, although it is divided into sections according to the continents of the world, but the maps are not listed country by country. The interesting things you can find in it are a great variety of images of our Earth, which are not common in common atlases. You can appreciate the beautiful of our planet in very different perspectives. The images are really beautiful! Some of the readers may be disappointed that their home towns cannot be seen in the book (but I'm lucky enough to see mine!). However, if you are a true lover of your home planet, it's a real gem for you.
17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Amazing collection of images of our Earth from above. 6 Nov 1998
By stefan@matchframe.com - Published on Amazon.com
I came accross this book at a large retail bookstore outlet called Borders. I found myself enthralled in it for at least 30 minutes before I realized I should be heading for the doors before closing. I was could have purchased the book then and there, but I wanted to see the price difference here at Amazon.com. Sure enough it was a better buy at Amazon. I say get this book and leave it out where people can flip through and enjoy it to it's fullest.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What in the world? 15 Sep 2003
By FrKurt Messick - Published on Amazon.com
As a child, I was always fascinated by maps, and fascinated by astronomy. In many ways, this book combines those fascinations in one truly remarkable text. Every page is a full-colour plate, showing satellite-produced images of the entire world in multiple respects.
The organisation of the book is basic, as any other atlas; the major sections include the World, North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, and Antarctica. In addition to these major sections, there are shorter pieces on satellites (both history of satellites and how satellites work), the future, and credits/index sections.
This is no simple book of maps. There are typical geopolitical maps, to be sure, as apart from the basic outlines, it is sometimes hard to tell what is being shown in the photographs. However, pride of place certainly belongs to the photographs, from both the visible light spectrum and non-visible (ultra-high and -low) spectrums. These show geological topography, physical features, vegetation, climate, oceans, population, constructed/built-up features, and more.
With regard to the oceans, there are different types of satellite images which show temperature variations, depth, underwater vegetation, geological fault lines, and even pollution. There is a fascinating section showing the seasonal variations of ocean temperature and motion due to El Nino effects.
Similarly, with population and developed areas, it is mesmerising to see the differences and similarities across the various continents. Cities look very much the same in many respects from space in the distant view; the dominant characteristics at ranges that cover tens of miles is often the contours and geological/natural formations that surround a city. However, when close-up ranges are shown, the human constructions become apparent, and the cities show their unique characters based on the population in connection with their environments. One particularly fun photograph is a composition photograph showing the lights at night around the world. This particular map shows dense population around cities, particularly coastal cities; however, this can be deceptive, as the more highly populated country of India puts out less light at night than the lesser populated but more technologically advanced North America and Europe.
This is a wonderful way to look at the world, to see the kinds of things that a traditional map with boundaries and countries would not show. Done with the quality photography and explanation that is the hallmark of National Geographic, this large-format book would look at home equally on the shelf of a student of any age as well as the coffee table of a well-appointed home.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, Informative 28 Aug 2002
By Matthew Jankowski - Published on Amazon.com
Shows the world in all its glory. Get a full color birdseye of pollution, urbanization, natural/industrial disasters, and many amazing natural phenomena.
Really excellent.
8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting maps. 1 Jan 2002
By "civmaster" - Published on Amazon.com
This is a very different and interesting Atlas: you will have the feeling of looking at the ground from the space.
But I wanna say sth. bad: I think this map is not a good one if you want to expand your knowledge of countries, cities... And the satelite pictures are not well orgnized in the atlas. It will take time to identify where is a detailed map from, and the detailed maps (added together) cover only a very small part of the world. So in some sense, this is an "enjoyment" of satellite pictures other than a world atlas.
But overall, I rank this atlas a very good one.
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