Nashville Skyline has been added to your Basket
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by RevivalMedia
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Over 2 Million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched on the same or next working day from the UK.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£7.33
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: best_value_entertainment
Add to Basket
£7.42
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: The Music Warehouse
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £5.79

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Nashville Skyline
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Nashville Skyline Import


Price: £7.36 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
7 new from £7.20 12 used from £0.99 1 collectible from £6.99
£7.36 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Bob Dylan Store

Music

Image of album by Bob Dylan

Photos

Image of Bob Dylan

Videos

Biography

BOB DYLAN Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Bob Dylan's influence on popular music is incalculable. As a songwriter, he pioneered several different schools of pop songwriting, from confessional singer/songwriter to winding, hallucinatory, stream-of-consciousness narratives. As a vocalist, he broke down the notion that a singer must have a conventionally good voice in order to ... Read more in Amazon's Bob Dylan Store

Visit Amazon's Bob Dylan Store
for 429 albums, 24 photos, videos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Nashville Skyline + John Wesley Harding + Blonde On Blonde
Price For All Three: £19.34

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (25 April 1988)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Sony Music
  • ASIN: B000025YBA
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 16,878 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Product Description

Bob Dylan - Nashville Skyline

Amazon.co.uk

While Dylan is one of the prime creators of "country rock," Nashville Skyline is as close to a real country album as any he's ever made. Unfortunately, Dylan's decision to sing it in an un-nasal, un-Dylanesque style leaves one of rock's greatest singers seriously handicapped, as if Ali had to box one-handed. As a result, this set can never be any better than its songs. When they're throw-aways ("Country Pie"), even all the great Nashville pickers on board can't help. But when they're good ("I Threw It All Away", "Lay Lady Lay"), they're unforgettable. --David Cantwell

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Penguin Egg on 2 Mar. 2002
Format: Audio CD
This may not be classic Bob Dylan, and coming as it did hard on the heels of the great triumvirate: Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited, and Blonde on Blonde, it must have come as a bit of a disappointment. However, taking it at face value, it is a fine country album, which is what Dylan intended it to be. It also has two classic songs: Lay Lady Lay and Girl From the North Country. Lay Lady Lay, with it's sincere and heartfelt erotic imagery, has to be one of the prettiest tunes Dylan ever wrote. Girl From The North Country, a duet with Johnny Cash, which in itself shows Dylan acknowledging his rock 'n ' roll and country roots, is a song about the acceptance of loss, a reflection on lost love, and the lingering tug on the heart of a past love.
The other songs are fine. Nashville Skyline Rag and Country Pie are good fun. You can imagine both these songs being played to delighted revellers at a hoedown. The other tracks are finely crafted songs, as you would expect of Dylan, still at the peak of his powers. Not a classic album, but one showing Dylan carefully treading water, showing a part of his roots, and producing a satisfying album to delight both Dylan and C&W fans.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 2 Aug. 2012
Format: Audio CD
This 1969 release, the ninth studio album from icon Bob Dylan, is my absolute favourite of his albums, even above `Highway 61' or `Blood On The Tracks'.

Following the trend set in `67s John Wesley Harding, Dylan goes completely country, with jaunty twanging guitars, and a lighter singing voice that was totally different to the voice he had employed previously. He even teams up with country legend Johnny Cash on the opener `Girl From The North Country', to great effect. What makes it stand out for me is that it is such a happy album. Dylan's best music often came from sublimating his personal adversities into music, with dark and musically powerful tales resulting. But here the man just seems to be very happy, and is trying to transmit that feeling through the music. So an album full of simple odes to love and paeans of happiness results. It's an album impossible to listen to all the way through without having a big wide grin on your face as the music uplifts you. Ant to top it all is the inclusion of `Lay Lady Lay', which I have to say would be one of my desert island discs.

I just love this album. It's got a real feelgood factor, Johnny Cash and one of my all time favourite tracks, Lay Lady Lay. 5 stars unreservedly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Edward Barry on 8 Aug. 2002
Format: Audio CD
My favourite album. Dylan switches from high octane throwaway "let's be deliberately obscure and consolidate the fan base" lyrics to go with the Country flow. Ultimately it is the honesty, witness 'I Threw It All Away',that shines through and dedicates every track a classic. Essentially not a "If you buy just one Dylan album...", rather one for those who appreciate a slowing of the heatbeat and a trip down the winding lane possibities of contemporary music.Buy that brass bed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD
One of the founders of the country rock revolution, although it appearing in 1969 and that revolution had already been occuring for some time, this album offers several strong compositions while at the same time having so many tracks that are so short it doesn't seem like an album at all, but more of a professionaly done EP (anyone remember what EP stands for, btw?). Some tracks are considered rather uneven, like "Country Pie", "Peggy Day", and "Nashville Skyline Rag". This album also marks the first time the critical establishment was rather wary at supporting their favorite nasal-singing troubador, who just a few years before this was released had been spouting wild lyrics about Siamese cats and everybody must get stoned to this rather lightweight material, and instead is singing country ballads and stuff like "I'd love to spend the night with Peggy Day." Not only that, he's singing in a voice that totally departs from his other work, making this even more of a shock. This would, in a very short time, explode into a full scale assault with the release of Self Portrait, although a few (just a few) could have gotten onto this release and sounded right at home.

The biggest problem with this album is how SHORT it is. One of my biggest pet peeves are short albums, and I think a minimum for an album is 30 minutes. Anything below that is a travesty to the buying public, especially now when records can be so much longer because of CD technology. All of Dylan's LPs that went before this with the exception of his debut and JOHN WESLEY HARDING ranged in the 50 minute range, with BLONDE ON BLONDE being 73 minutes long, the very first double album ever, though not a double album by Dylan standards (it would have had to be 100 minutes long).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By The Guardian TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 April 2012
Format: Audio CD
By 1969 Dylan was on record as being tired of being held up as "the spokesman for his generation". He claimed "that notion needed to be pulled up by its roots" and the mellowed, down-home style of the album 'Nashville Skyline' was in part his public response.

Like `Blonde on Blonde' and `John Wesley Harding', NS was recorded in Nashville TN. This 1969 release is unapologetically in the style of the contemporary popular country music which at the time filled the airwaves in and around Nashville, and is as far away from traditional Woody-Guthrie style American folk with its themes of political protest and social commentary as you can imagine. The album is remarkable above all for showcasing Dylan's voice as a melodic crooner, with no hint of the by then universally recognised nasal drawl used to such effect on his more hard-edged material.

One of the highlights of NS is the opening duet with Johnny Cash, `Girl from the North Country', originally a composition from `Freewheelin' and based around a traditional English folk ballad Dylan had learned on a trip to England in 1963. This is the only survivor from many different duet sessions with JC in Nashville in 1969, the only one deemed album-worthy. The album also contains `Lay Lady Lay' which Dylan originally wrote for the soundtrack of the movie `Midnight Cowboy' but delivered too late for inclusion in the film, and which nevertheless went on to be a successful single and one of his most famous songs. All the songs are short and share similar themes, exhibit fine production values and hang together well.

Dylan has made avoidance of pigeon-holing a career-speciality and honed it to a fine art. In the context of his prodigious and influential output in the 1960s there is no better example than `Nashville Skyline.' Yet again his critics were confounded: the album was a great commercial success and, not for the first time, brought a new type of audience to his music.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback