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Narrative Theology and Moral Theology: The Infinite Horizon (Ashgate New Critical Thinking in Religion, Theology & Biblical Studies) (Ashgate New ... in Religion, Theology and Biblical Studies) [Hardcover]

Alexander Lucie-Smith

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28 Mar 2007 Ashgate New Critical Thinking in Religion, Theology and Biblical Studies
Moral thinking today finds itself stranded between the particular and the universal. Alasdair Maclntyre's work on narrative, discussed here along with that of Stanley Hauerwas and H. T. Engelhardt, aims to undo the perceived damage done by the Enlightenment by returning to narrative and abandoning the illusion of a disembodied reason that claims to be able give a coherent explanation for everything. It is precisely this - a theory that holds good for all cases - that John Rawls proposed, drawing on the heritage of Emmanuel Kant. Who is right? Must universality be abandoned? Must we only think about morality in terms that are relative, bound by space and time? Alexander Lucie-Smith attempts to answer these questions by examining the nature of narrative itself as well as the particular narratives of Rawls and St Augustine. Bound and rooted as they are in history and personal experience, narratives nevertheless strain at the limits imposed on them. It is Lucie-Smith's contention that each narrative that points to a lived morality exists against the background of an infinite horizon; and thus it is that the particular and the rooted can also make us aware of the universal and unchanging.

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About the Author

Alexander Lucie-Smith is the Head of Moral and Pastoral Theology at Tangaza College, Nairobi, Kenya, a constituent college of the Catholic University of East Africa, where he teaches fundamental moral theology. He is an ordained Catholic priest and a member of the Institute of Charity. He holds an MA from Oxford in English Literature, and a Licence in moral theology from the Gregorian University, Rome. Apart from this he is a published novelist, a regular book reviewer for The Tablet and a columnist for the Catholic Herald, under the pseudonym David McLaurin.

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