The Napoleon of Notting Hill and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£7.81
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £0.18 (2%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Napoleon of Notting Hill Paperback – 11 Oct 2008


See all 106 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 11 Oct 2008
£7.81
£0.01 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£7.50

Frequently Bought Together

The Napoleon of Notting Hill + The Man Who Was Thursday (Penguin English Library) + The Complete Father Brown Stories
Price For All Three: £15.79

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: House of Stratus; New edition edition (11 Oct 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0755100174
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755100170
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.1 x 20.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,057,356 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'An utterly original surreal fantasy … This great book imagines a London composed of medieval city states with Notting Hill ranged in a war against the other boroughs. Has the unexpected, surreal tone of Chestertons other masterpiece, The Man Who Was Thursday.' --The American Chesterton Society --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

GK Chesterton was born in London in 1874 and educated at St Paul's School, before studying art at the Slade School. In 1896, he began working for the London publisher, Redway, and also T. Fisher Unwin as a reader where he remained until 1902. During this time he undertook his first freelance journalistic assignments writing art and literary reviews. He also contributed regular columns to two newspapers: the Speaker (along with his friend Hilaire Belloc) and the Daily News. Throughout his life he contibuted further articles to journals, particularly The Bookman and The Illustrated London News. His first two books were published; two poetry collections, in 1900. These were followed by collections of essays and in 1903 by his most substantial work to that point; a study of Robert Browning. Chesterton's first novel, 'The Napoleon of Notting Hill' was published in 1904. In this book he developed his political attitudes in which he attacked socialism, big business and technology and showed how they become the enemies of freedom and justice. These were themes which were to run throughout his other works. 'The Man who was Thursday' was published in 1908 and is perhaps the novel most difficult to understand, although it is also his most popular. 'The Ball and the Cross' followed in 1910 and 'Manalive' in 1912. Chesterton's best-known fictional character appears in the Father Brown stories, the first of the collection, 'The Innocence of Father Brown', being published in 1911. Brown is a modest Catholic priest who uses careful psychology to put himself in the place of the criminal in order to solve the crime. His output was prolific, with a great variety of books from brilliant studies of Dickens, Shaw, and RL Stevenson to literary criticism. He also produced more poetry and many volumes of political, social and religious essays. Tremendous zest and energy, with a mastery of paradox, puns, a robust humour and forthright devotion along with great intelligence characterise his entire output. In the years prior to 1914 his fame was at its height, being something of a celebrity and seen as a latter day Dr Johnson as he frequented the pubs and offices of Fleet Street. His huge figure was encased in a cloak and wide brimmed hat, with pockets full of papers and proofs. Chesterton came from a nominlly Anglican family and had been baptized into the Church of England. However, he had no particular Christian belief and was in fact agnostic for a time. Nevertheless, in his late

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Oct 1999
Format: Paperback
This great book imagines a london composed of medieval city states - with notting hill ranged in a war against the other boroughs. Has the unexpected, surreal tone of Chesteron's other masterpiece, The Man who was Thursday.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 6 Sep 2008
Format: Paperback
Imagine a 1984 London where society has frozen at turn-of-the-century levels, a King is randomly selected from the populace, and nobody really takes politics seriously.

Of course, it only takes one wise, weird little man to turn all of that on its head. G.K. Chesterton's magnificently absurd comic novel explores a common theme in his books -- a person who entertains himself with an absurdly serious world -- in an increasingly heated situation where the little boroughs of London have become warring kingdoms. Not much in the way of sci-fi, but a delicious little social satire.

Friends of the eccentric Auberon Quin are understandably shocked when he is selected as the new King of England... especially since his main focus is definitely not power ("Oh! I will toil for you, my faithful people! You shall have a banquet of humour!"). After bumping into a young boy with a toy sword, Quin decides to revive the old city-states of medieval times, with city walls, banners, halberdiers, coat of arms, and ruling provosts -- all as a joke.

But ten years later, a young man named Adam Wayne -- who happens to be the little boy who inspired Quin -- refuses to let a road go through Notting Hill. Quin is first delighted and then perplexed by Wayne, a man who treats the King's joke with deadly seriousness. Now a full-out medieval battle is brewing between the boroughs of London, and Auberon Quin finds that his joke may have some very serious consequences...

G.K. Chesterton was no H.G. Wells when it came from trying to imagine the future --- the 1984 London he imagined was pretty much the same, technologically and socially, as the London of 1904.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Auberon Quin on 29 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Many people will be familiar with he Father Brown stories but Chesterton wrote so much more. This book follows the development of a practical joke devised by England's randomly elected king - a man who acknowledges only humour - when it collides with a serious idealist, who has taken the idea wholly to heart.
As always with GKC, moral messages overflow from every page but the action rolls along, includes a couple of battles ands with the two men realising that they are but two sides of the same coin.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ashtar Command on 25 Dec 2010
Format: Paperback
"The Napoleon of Notting Hill" is probably the most absurd novel I've ever read. The author, G K Chesterton, was a colorful, verbose and highly eclectic British intellectual. He supported the Boer and the Irish, opposed the suffragettes, and collaborated with Guild Socialists, only to become entangled with the notorious Catholic fundamentalist Hilaire Belloc. I honestly admit that I don't quite understand the man!

Still, there seem to be some unifying themes in Chesterton's voluminous writings. The most obvious is traditional Christianity, first in the form of Anglicanism, later as Catholicism. The reader shouldn't be surprised if some of the characters in his novels turn out to be angels, the Devil, or God himself. Second is a kind of populism. Chesterton emphasizes common sense, the opinions of the common man, the everyday life of the common people, etc. As one of the characters in "The Napoleon of Notting Hill" puts it: "The human being, the common man, whom mere geniuses like you and me can only worship like a god". In his economic writings, he idealizes the peasantry. In other contexts, Chesterton says that life in the city is intrinsically interesting, and calls on realist writers to relate to it. Finally, there is a search for authenticity, as opposed to the artificial greyness of modernity and the tyranny of the Zeitgeist. Somehow, Chesterton believed that this authenticity could be found among ordinary people, hence making a connection to his populism.

All three themes are present in "The Napoleon of Notting Hill", published in 1904 and one of Chesterton's earliest novels. Both the setting and the plot are completely absurd, although the absurdity is revealed to have a point at the very end of the story. The setting is a futuristic Britain.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By L. Holloway on 22 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A tragi-comedy. very philosophical and with wonderful characters and descriptions. Everyone should read G K chesterton. Discusses humman nature at a remarkably deep level but with laughs.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Blumenau TOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Aug 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The humour of G.K.Chesterton is sometimes completely zany, but most of the time delightfully inventive. I found the opening few pages of the zany type quite irritating. They were intended to introduce two themes: (1) you never know what kind of a monarch you get from a hereditary monarchy: you might just as well pick a monarch at random. (2) Auberon Quin is as mad as a hatter - at this stage there appears to be no method in his surrealistic sense of humour. And then he is picked on as the next king.

As king, however, there is method in his madness and purpose in Chesterton's wit. The King is determined to take nothing seriously, and politics the least of all. One day he hits on the idea how amusing it would be to give autonomy to the boroughs of London, to revive their antiquity (he makes up what might be the historical origin of names like Kensington, Bayswater, Notting Hill etc) and to equip them with medieval coats of arms and a medieval set of officials like High Provosts who may enter his presence only when escorted by a group of halberdiers in the liveries designed by the King. And that is what he does.

After ten years, however, conflict breaks out between some of these boroughs, when businessmen plan to drive a highway through three of them, from Hammersmith to Westbourne Grove. Adam Wayne, the passionate 19 year old High Provost of Notting Hill, objected to the demolition of a little street in the borough. It is not only a question of independence: it is a question of maintaining a stand against Modernity. To the King's confusion, what Quin had constructed as a matter of whimsical amusement, Wayne was taking as a matter of deadly seriousness, a sacred ideal worth fighting for.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback