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Naoki Urasawa's Monster: Volume 1 Paperback – 21 Feb 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Viz Media; Reprint edition (21 Feb 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591166411
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591166412
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 12.7 x 18.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 483,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Kim Dyer on 18 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Although not different to the anime in content, the manga is the superior to the two.

I feel that the previous reviewer did not do this manga justice. 'Monster' is not just an incredible thriller, but is a compelling moral tale. Tenma is an expert neuro-surgeon with a promising future ahead of him. However, after his director instructs him to abandon his treatment of a Turkish worker (thus leaving this man to die) in order to perform a relatively minor opperation on a well known opera singer, he begins to see that his hospital is corrupt to the core and the people in positions of power do not believe that all men are created equal. Therefore, when Tenma is later ordered to stop operating on a boy with a serious head-wound in order to treat a richer client, he refuses to do so. This choice will set a series of events in motion which finally end several years later with Tenma as a wanted man, accused of several murders, and fleeing the police while trying to prove his innocence by revealing the true identity of a mysterous young man called Johann.

As I said before, Naoki Urasawa is a visionary. 'Monster' is so much more than just a thriller. It focuses on many moral implications such as whether or not one life is as valuable as another, the nature of choice and what it really is that makes a monster. On top of this is the historial aspects of the plot, as it is set mainly in Germany just after the fall of the Berlin Wall and does an incredible job of realistically presenting this time period.

I have been following this series since the first volume was released and have just finished reading volume 13. As this series is 18 volumes long, and so far has never lost its knack for keeping me enticed and excited since the first volume, I can honestly say that it is one of the best series's that I have ever read and could not recommend it more to anyone.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stan FREDO on 1 Aug 2010
Format: Paperback
Dr Tenma, a talented young japanese surgeon, goes to a German hospital to further up his career. Back at home, it was blocked by his older brother, destined to take over his father's hospital. Tenma (also the name of Astro Boy's creator in Osamu Tezuka's revered series) soon discovers that western hospitals also have their own politics. Led by his conscience, Tenma makes the wrong move and his career is in shambles until... Of Urasawa, I have only read the Pluto series (Pluto: Urasawa X Tezuka volume 1), his brilliant mid-2000s masterpiece homage to Tezuka. This Monster series begins as masterly. The plot, the dialogs, the drawings, everything has to be praised.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Panagiotis Christakos on 1 Aug 2011
Format: Paperback
This brief comment is not for volume 1 alone, but the entire series: the manga seems to be amazing and I loved the first couple of volumes, just to find out that many volumes are out of print, making it impossible for my budget to collect them and read the series.
If you can pay more than 50 quid for a small manga paperback then well done, but for those like myself who cannot I give it 1 star to catch your attention
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By Vanessa F on 2 Mar 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This manga may hands down be one of the best that I have ever read. And I do not make that statement lightly. I may not have the biggest manga shelf in the world, but what I have read of Monster makes me want to sing its praises from the rooftops. It's very rare in my history of reading manga for me to have given 4 or 5 star ratings with every single volume I've read. Usually with manga you get one bum volume every now and again, with a story arc that goes nowhere or just silly one-shot gag settings that may have seemed hilarious to the creator at the time, but are lost in translation.

Not in Monster. Oh no. Urasawa has a gripping, clever crime thriller to tell, and you're going to want to be with it every step of the way.

Monster tells the story of Dr. Kenzo Tenma, a brilliant Japanese neurosurgeon working in West Germany in the 1980s. He has a beautiful fiancée, he's the head of the neurosurgery department at his hospital, he has the blessing of the hospital director, and the respect and admiration of all his colleagues. However, Dr. Tenma is shaken one day by the hospital forcing him to operate on a rich patron rather than a poor Turkish man, who had more severe injuries.

So when the hospital try to force him to operate on the town mayor, suffering from a stroke, rather than a little boy who's been shot in the head, he follows his heart and saves the life of little Johan Liebert.

This act puts Tenma in incredibly hot water, though. His fiancée Eva breaks off their engagement, he loses his position as chief of neurosurgery, and the hospital director now refuses to back him at all, following this 'irresponsible' act. Dr.
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