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NO FOCUS: Punk on Film Paperback – 2 Dec 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HEADPRESS (2 Dec 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1900486598
  • ISBN-13: 978-1900486590
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 17.8 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 706,459 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A. Ratcliff on 18 Dec 2006
Format: Paperback
Just when you thought you had read every possible angle on punk, comes this fascinating and absorbing new book which covers the previously untouched territory of Punk cinema.

No Focus (presumably a pun on No Future), is exhaustive in the range and depth of films it covers, from obscure underground shorts to mainstream blockbusters.

Over twenty two chapters, Chris Barber, Jack Sargeant and an ensemble of other writers with different perspectives trace the influence of punk on film. From the DIY aesthetics and low budget shock tactics of early punk shorts to complete sections on the Sex Pistols, The Clash and Crass, documenting their film making antics and a lengthy section on Derek Jarman that explores the relationship between punk attitudes and film auterism. Further it traces the sub-genre's influences back to Bunuel's early surrealist films and the European avant-garde and its evolution towards the post industrial and post modern.

Other sections cover youth-sploitation films like Suburbia, punk in horror/sci-fi (Repo Man, Liquid Sky, Return of the Living Dead etc.), exclusive interviews with the likes of directors Julien Temple, Penelope Spheeris, Amos Poe, Don Letts and Billy Childish and provide a thorough list of obscure movies and rare live music clips to look out for.

The book includes a large number of illustrations and is both fun, informative and provoking to read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Focusing on Punk Movies 21 Dec 2006
By A. Ratcliff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Just when you thought you had read every possible angle on punk, comes this fascinating and absorbing new book which covers the previously untouched territory of Punk cinema.

No Focus (presumably a pun on No Future), is exhaustive in the range and depth of films it covers, from obscure underground shorts to mainstream blockbusters.

Over twenty two chapters, Chris Barber, Jack Sargeant and an ensemble of other writers with different perspectives trace the influence of punk on film. From the DIY aesthetics and low budget shock tactics of early punk shorts to complete sections on the Sex Pistols, The Clash and Crass, documenting their film making antics and a lengthy section on Derek Jarman that explores the relationship between punk attitudes and film auterism. Further it traces the sub-genre's influences back to Bunuel's early surrealist films and the European avant-garde and its evolution towards the post industrial and post modern.

Other sections cover youth-sploitation films like Suburbia, punk in horror/sci-fi (Repo Man, Liquid Sky, Return of the Living Dead etc.), exclusive interviews with the likes of directors Julien Temple, Penelope Spheeris, Amos Poe, Don Letts and Billy Childish and provide a thorough list of obscure movies and rare live music clips to look out for.

The book includes a large number of illustrations and is fun, informative and provoking to read.
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