Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 2.80

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Mythos [Mass Market Paperback]

Kelly McCullough
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: 4.77 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 26 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Frequently Bought Together

Mythos + SpellCrash + Cybermancy
Price For All Three: 14.80

Buy the selected items together
  • SpellCrash 4.75
  • Cybermancy 5.28

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 289 pages
  • Publisher: Ace Books (26 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 044101724X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441017249
  • Product Dimensions: 2.3 x 10.3 x 16.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 961,428 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 stars! Ravirn series #4 12 Jun 2009
By Detra Fitch TOP 1000 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Mass Market Paperback
As our story opens, Ravirn is about to attempt hacking into Necessity, the computer-goddess. Why? One: Ravirn feels responsible for what has happened to Shara (once a webgoblin). Two: He wants to find out what happened to Ahllan (a webtroll and former leader of the "familiar" underground). Three: Just to see if he could. Ravirn cannot help himself. It is in his nature to attempt any hacking challenge he comes across. You see, Ravirn is now a "power" of Chaos. Raven is the name of Ravirn's soul and power. The name makes him more impulsive, sarcastic, and prone to risk-taking (like hacking Necessity). He is one face of the Trickster and is able to (painfully) shapeshift into a giant raven at will.

The result of the hacking attempt sends Ravirn, Melchior (his familiar/webgoblin), and Tisiphone (one of the three Furies and Ravirn's sometimes lover) into a totally different mythos - or reality. The trio is found by Ahllan, who has learned enough about the reality to survive. However, Chaos is not abundant here and the group's powers are vastly diminished. Even worse, it is the Norse gods present instead of the Greek. (Neither of whom believed the others were anything but myths.) Worse still, the gods have taken sides and a war is imminent.

Odin may see all and know all, but Ravirn is a wild card. Odin cannot see Ravirn's future or what would happen should he decide to simply kill Ravirn or let him live. Either choice could have Ragnarok (the end of days) happen sooner than expected. Yet on the other side of the draw battle line, Loki sees Ravirn as potential he could use. Perhaps Ragnarok could be totally avoided. If not, perhaps a split can be made so other mythos could have happier endings than they.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hacking Necessity - What could go wrong? 3 Jun 2009
Format:Mass Market Paperback
What should be done when divine magic alone is not enough to keep track of all creation? Why, enlist the aid of computers, of course, turning hacking and programming into required skills for Gods and Demigods alike. This is the central conceit of Kelly McCullough's series featuring Ravirn, hacker, sorcerer, descendant of Fate and nascent power of Chaos, of which MythOS is the fourth volume. This is certainly an original idea, and McCullough has managed to create some engaging and intriguing characters over the past three books (Webmage, Cybermancy and Codespell (Ace Fantasy Book)), ranging from Melchior, Ravirn's goblin cum laptop sidekick, to Eris, the Goddess of Discord with her server farm of Golden Apples. The plots have been intriguing, too, with Ravirn defending the free will of humanity against the machinations of Fate, unwittingly breaking Persephone out of the underworld with a computer virus, and having to hack Necessity, the ultimate arbiter of reality, in order to fix the virus' damage.

When MythOS opens, Ravirn is up to his old hacking tricks again, trying to break into Necessity again in search of his friend, the webtroll Ahllan, who vanished sometime before. Almost immediately, however, he finds himself catapulted into an entirely different `pantheoverse', where the Norse deities rule, along with Melchior and the fury Tisiphone, guardian of Necessity and Ravirn's current lover.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  12 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but.... 2 Jun 2009
By T. Powell - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Switching to another pantheon? In this installment, Ravirn is transported from the Greek pantheon to the Norse pantheon. I'm not sure if McCullough has run out of ideas when it comes to the Greek, but mixing the Norse mythology added new characters and new ideas.

Generally speaking, I liked who the Raven became and some of the things that he was able to do. I liked the idea that the Raven did things that Odin couldn't/wouldn't do. On the other hand, I can't understand why Tisiphone went along. True, she did some fighting, but since she was outside of Necessity's domain, she wasn't a fury. Without wanting to spoil things too much, I didn't like what Tisiphone became. I also feel that the new characters involved just didn't develop like they should. Maybe, McCollough is setting us up for his next book. I hope so. I loved the first 3 books.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Norse Myth's Alternative Future History 23 Oct 2009
By Christina Paige - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
If you ever grow weary of vampires, werewolves, and empowered females behaving badly in pseudo-historical settings, you might be pleasantly surprised, delighted even, by MythOS, a hacker's take on Greek and Norse mythology. This is one for the gamers, computer nerds, mythology geeks, and anti-heroes. And that's all of us, isn't it, one way or another?
The protagonist, Ravirn, usually inhabits and hacks in a universe where the Greek myths are the One True Reality - in fact, he is a descendant of Lachesis, one of the three Fates. For reasons that remain inscrutable, the goddess Necessity, who the Greeks, by the way, referred to as `harsh necessity' (her name'shares a root with the words 'anguish' and 'angst'), has sent Ravirn to an alternate Norse reality. Seeing how several Greek deities want Ravirn dead, Necessity might be doing him a favor. On the other hand, she may be throwing him to the wolves, quite literally. Or, possibly, she sent him to disrupt the predeterminism of Norse mythology with its inevitable progression to Ragnarok, the last battle in which the gods themselves, and all their champions, (living, dead, and undead), everybody dies a final time. In any case, Ravirn finds himself petitioned by both opposing sides, by Odin and by Loki, Order and Chaos personified, to do something to avert their doom.
Ravirn had slept through most of his mythology classes, so he is at a loss until he realizes that these deities have their counterparts in the familiar ones of home. At the same time, he is perceptive enough to realize that the differences may be even more significant than the similarities between, say, Zeus and Thor, or Ares and Tyr. Ravirn is especially intrigued by local differences in primal chaos, the stuff from which all existence derives, and the programming languages of computer networks that the Aesir employ. Chaos is the direct source of his power, as well as his regenerative abilities, and Ravirn finds himself much more vulnerable in this new reality. Then the operating system poses a serious challenge to his hacking skills. The most important variable is that in his world, AIs give computer systems a soul, complete with personality, while the MimirNet is the sole - and soulless - functioning system in the nine worlds of Norse reality.
The supporting cast of characters is fantastic. The Fury Tisiphone accompanies Ravirn, and his sidekick is a net-goblin named Melchior. Like Ravirn, both Tisiphone and Melchior find their powers are muted in the Norse alternate reality, where they meet the aforementioned gods, plus Loki's sons: the Fenris wolf and the Midgard Serpent, and Odin's ravens, Thought and Memory - Ravirn's counterparts. McCullough has a fresh take on all the gods and `monsters.' Additionally, he brings Tyr's severed hand to life a la Thing from The Addams Family.
Can Ravirn the Trickster introduce an element of Lucretian swerve to the Norse myths, or will he get devoured by the Midgard Serpent, killed by Tyr, caught by Odin's Wild Hunt, or die in a systems crash while he's hacking the net?
I enjoyed this book so much, I promptly bought its predecessors: WebMage, Cybermancy, and CodeSpell, which explain how Ravirn got to be so very unpopular with his home gods.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars MythOS, stable, cheap, wish it was open source. 6 July 2009
By Matthew D. Joyce - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is the first time I've reviewed a book ever. I've revised an earlier review I had worked on.

MythOS is the fourth installment in the masterful Web Mage book series written by Kelly McCullough. Over at the NYC Resistor workshop, we are no strangers to this series, and anyone who has ever spent considerable time in our bathroom is well acquainted with the books. Blending ancient Greek mythology with modern technocracy has produced a profound work of literature that finds a balance in classical interpretation of drama and tragedy with the common parlance of our times. As true today as it was two millennium ago, the Greek's hallmark style of story telling and character development has inspired Ms McCullough to craft a masterwork in the genre of science fiction. As we follow the lead character "Ravirn" we are taken through a roller coaster of love affairs with Hellenic age foes, and divine heroines whose allure wafts from the pages like a fine perfume. As you are introduced to this magical world of web goblins and code spells, you find yourself gripping the pages like the last stable purchase holding you to your mundane reality and saving you from the adventure within. But you wish for nothing more than to let go.

MythOS is a real gem in the series as the author has decided to temporarily depart from the Greek mythology and tell a tale that occurs in a new magical operating system or "MythOS" that is governed by the rules of Norse mythology. Trading classical drama for the infusion of the epic tales of Norse bards and some of the most primal tales we have preserved through the ages of human existence offers a unique opportunity to blend three cultural dichotomies across the expanse of time and space. And Kelly does not disappoint. The fatalistic war addled gods of Valhalla provide a jaw dropping backdrop of adventure, intrigue, and insight into a cultural divide that is too often left unexplored. However the taint of Greek tragedy is never far from Ravirn as he faces off against impossible odds to defy the fate of Ragnarok that dooms this new MythOS. His only allies are the forces of chaos lead by the devilish Loki himself, renowned god of mischief. And facing them is a mountain full of histories greatest warriors lead by Odin himself. Added into the mix of Norse myth and modern technology is a familiar face from the Greek past. Tisiphone the Fury of Vengeance as well as Raven's strong armed girl friend is left coming to grips with the loss of her mother ( and the mother of invention ) necessity. Also returning to the story line is an old web troll ( main frame ) that is responsible for a revolution of sorts of AIs against the sisters of fate. And of course the now quantum processing Melchior, who is Raven's sidekick and webtroll.

While the interplay between Norse and Greek gods is in and of itself a merry intellectual pursuit, and fodder for a truly entertaining story what really makes this book worth mentioning is the attachment to technical nuance. For instance the conversion from kerberos to heimdal in this new mythos parallels our own technical past as europe developed it's own kerberos variant aptly named heimdal. Today we see these technical divides in our own lives, and provides a believable thread upon which to weave a modern myth.

Ultimately though you'll find yourself laughing to the tune of fantastic otherworldly uses of technical jargon. The nerd in you will cringe with delight, and your better self will find a perverted sort of enjoyment in the play on words. Just remember to leave your skepticism and attachment to the more subtle plot and character development techniques of the past century at the cover, and just try to honestly enjoy what the author has produced for you.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 stars! Ravirn series #4 12 Jun 2009
By Detra Fitch - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
As our story opens, Ravirn is about to attempt hacking into Necessity, the computer-goddess. Why? One: Ravirn feels responsible for what has happened to Shara (once a webgoblin). Two: He wants to find out what happened to Ahllan (a webtroll and former leader of the "familiar" underground). Three: Just to see if he could. Ravirn cannot help himself. It is in his nature to attempt any hacking challenge he comes across. You see, Ravirn is now a "power" of Chaos. Raven is the name of Ravirn's soul and power. The name makes him more impulsive, sarcastic, and prone to risk-taking (like hacking Necessity). He is one face of the Trickster and is able to (painfully) shapeshift into a giant raven at will.

The result of the hacking attempt sends Ravirn, Melchior (his familiar/webgoblin), and Tisiphone (one of the three Furies and Ravirn's sometimes lover) into a totally different mythos - or reality. The trio is found by Ahllan, who has learned enough about the reality to survive. However, Chaos is not abundant here and the group's powers are vastly diminished. Even worse, it is the Norse gods present instead of the Greek. (Neither of whom believed the others were anything but myths.) Worse still, the gods have taken sides and a war is imminent.

Odin may see all and know all, but Ravirn is a wild card. Odin cannot see Ravirn's future or what would happen should he decide to simply kill Ravirn or let him live. Either choice could have Ragnarok (the end of days) happen sooner than expected. Yet on the other side of the draw battle line, Loki sees Ravirn as potential he could use. Perhaps Ragnarok could be totally avoided. If not, perhaps a split can be made so other mythos could have happier endings than they.

Caught between two sides in a god war, Team Greek needs to find allies quickly if they do not want to be crushed. And no one knows what is happening in the Greek panthon, but the few clues they find whisper of horrible things.

***** FOUR AND A HALF STARS! A few sub-plot strings are left loose as hints to what readers may find in the Greek reality when the next installment of this series continues. I am especially interested to find out how the spinnerettes are involved, as well as about a certain icy lady. I can say no more about them without minor spoilers.

After three novels set in the Greek reality, I found it strange to be suddenly reading about Norse gods and goddesses. I missed many of the previous characters and look forward to hearing what has been happening while the trio was absent. Yet I found the Norse characters to be interesting as well and would not mind returning to the Norse reality in some future story. As always, this author writes a smooth flowing tale that entices the imagination and leaves me hungry for more. *****

Reviewed by Detra Fitch of Huntress Reviews.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hacking Necessity - What could go wrong? 4 Jun 2009
By T. McAuley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
What should be done when divine magic alone is not enough to keep track of all creation? Why, enlist the aid of computers, of course, turning hacking and programming into required skills for Gods and Demigods alike. This is the central conceit of Kelly McCullough's series featuring Ravirn, hacker, sorcerer, descendant of Fate and nascent power of Chaos, of which MythOS is the fourth volume. This is certainly an original idea, and McCullough has managed to create some engaging and intriguing characters over the past three books (WebMage (Ravirn, Book 1), Cybermancy (Ravirn, Book 2) and Codespell (Ravirn, Book 3)), ranging from Melchior, Ravirn's goblin cum laptop sidekick, to Eris, the Goddess of Discord with her server farm of Golden Apples. The plots have been intriguing, too, with Ravirn defending the free will of humanity against the machinations of Fate, unwittingly breaking Persephone out of the underworld with a computer virus, and having to hack Necessity, the ultimate arbiter of reality, in order to fix the virus' damage.

When MythOS opens, Ravirn is up to his old hacking tricks again, trying to break into Necessity again in search of his friend, the webtroll Ahllan, who vanished sometime before. Almost immediately, however, he finds himself catapulted into an entirely different `pantheoverse', where the Norse deities rule, along with Melchior and the fury Tisiphone, guardian of Necessity and Ravirn's current lover. Now, he has to learn a new form of magic and a new form of programming in order to find out where he is, and how to get home, all while trying to avoid being entangled in the conflict between Odin, and Loki, his fated destroyer, and worrying about what is going on back home, where all is clearly not well.

Ravirn fans may miss the presence of some of the characters from previous books, in particular the mischievous Eris, but by taking Ravirn into a new reality McCullough has given himself full rein to introduce a range of interesting new ones, while maintaining his trademark humorous style. There's Odin, controlling his realm through his domination of the magical software market - with MimirSoft; Fenir, the wolf of world's end, operating a computer company from an Icelandic volcano; and Jormundgand, the world-circling Midgard Serpent, conducting civilised discussions and reminiscing about listening to Homer. All these make for entertaining reading, and mean that fans are unlikely to be disappointed. I'm certainly looking forward to the new developments in the next book, and will be putting in a pre-order as soon as it's available.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback