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My Sherlock Holmes: Untold Stories of the Great Detective Paperback – 22 Jan 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 370 pages
  • Publisher: Non Basic Stock Line; Reprint edition (22 Jan 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312325959
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312325954
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.2 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,547,376 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

My Sherlock Holmes For over a century, readers have thrilled to the exploits of Sherlock Holmes as told from the point of view of Dr. Watson. But do Watson's tales really tell the true story of the Great Detective? In this collection of thirteen original tales, each narrated by a side character from the original canon, another side of the legend is revealed. From what Inspector Lestrade really thought about Holmes t... Full description

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By CHOI PA IL on 15 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
, said Sherlock Holmes in "A Study in Scarlet" and I totally agree with him about this book. The idea sounded promising but rendering is quite dissapointing. These stories are purported to be written by secondary characters in the original, but some deviate too much from the original & don't make sense. Only the six stories of the anthology deserve printing and the three among them are worth reading.

"the Incident of the Impecunious Chevalier" by Richard Lupoff is a sort of literary joke. Sherlock Holmes and his precursor C. August Dupin set off in search of the Maltase Falcon & succeed the mission but there is a twist in the end. I think this is the best piece of the anthology.

The characterizations of "the Doll Maker of Marigold Walk" by Barbara Hambly are faithful to the original, but the plot lacks ingenuity.

"the Adventure of the Forgotten Umbrella" by Mel Gilden and "Mrs. Hudson reminisces" by Linda Robertson are simply dull & insipid. (by the way, It appears to me that the author of the latter story can't tell South Downs from Surrey).

"Call me Wiggins" by Norman Schreiber is not bad but rather lengthy & I don't think an ordinary reader of sherlock holmes pastiches (like me) is very anxious to know about the detailed private life of Lewis Carroll.

"Mycroft's Great Game" by Gary Lovisi begins comically but ends rather sentimentally to my dissapoinment.

The Plot of "the Witch of Greenwich" by Gerard Dole is highly improbable, almost impossible & I could' t even finish "Cabaret Aus Assassins" by Cara Black!

"Years Ago in A Different Place" by Michael Kurland tells the truth behind the rift between Sherlock Holmes and Prof. Moriarty.
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Format: Paperback
This collection is based on a fairly interesting premise: what stories could have been told by "the others" mentioned in the canon (sometimes who played very important roles as well), but who had never got the centre-stage, so to say. The contents are:

(*) Introduction by Michael Kurland, the editor of this anthology.

1) 'The Incident of the Impecunious Chevalier' by Richard Lupoff: a wholly improbable early adventure of Holmes & Dupin, that discredits Holmes considerably, and has little redeeming value.

2) 'The Dollmaker of Marigold Walk' by Barbara Hambly: an atmospheric piece where the characters are true, the narrative is taut, and yet Holmes is at his insipid worst (something common in all the pastiches written by this author).

3) 'The Adventure of the Forgotten Umbrella' by Mel Gilden: a compact & readable piece, but nothing special.

4) 'Call Me Wiggins' by Norman Schreiber: a convoluted piece bringing Lewis Carroll and Sherlock Holmes together, but the puzzle is neither entertaining nor clever, and spreads rather libelous stuff about the Liddell household.

5) 'Mycroft's Great Game' by Gary Lovisi: a lengthy & drab piece about Moriarty being set up by Mycroft for the "benefit" of the British Empire, and how it had backfired.

6) 'The Witch of Greenwich' by Gerard Dole: a sensationalistic and improbable piece that is not worthy of commenting upon.

7) 'YEARS AGO AND IN A DIFFERENT PLACE' by Michael Kurland: the first, and brilliant story that suggests why & how Holmes harbours such antagonism for Moriarty. For more such pieces, I would like to recommend readers towards:
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This reads more like a homage to the character of Moriarty rather than Holmes and friends of Mr. Holmes will be aghast at the liberties taken with their friend's character.It is a pity that this genre is not safeguarded in some way in order to protect unsuspecting purchasers. The previous review of this book will supply details.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Entertaining feast! 26 Mar 2007
By RIJU GANGULY - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"My Sherlock Holmes: Untold Stories of the Great Detective" has been a Michael Kurland-special, so to say. Like his Professor Moriarty series, this book contains adventures truly and properly enshrined within the world of Sherlock Holmes, and yet are different in the sense that the protagonists are people whom we get to see only fleetingly in the `canon'. A brief description of the stories may be given as under:

1. "The Incident of the Impecunious Chevalier" by Richard Lupoff, involves Auguste Dupin, a rather disreputable Sherlock Holmes, and the Maltese Falcon (although unnamed).

2. "The Dollmaker of Marigold Walk" by Barbara Hambly is about the adventures of the 1st Mrs. Watson in Whitechapel (?!) in the year after that of the Ripper. This story also states that Mrs. Martha Hudson was the lover of Sherlock Holmes!

3. "The Adventure of the Forgotten Umbrella" by Mel Gilden presents the mentioned but never recounted (in the canon) adventure concerning James Phillimore.

4. "Call me Wiggins" by Norman Schreiber is the only case of detection attempted at (and succeded in) by the Baker Street Irregular Wiggins, involving Lewis Carroll and the Liddell family.

5. "Mycroft's Great Game" by Gary Lovisi presents both "The Final Problem" and "The Adventure of the Empty House" from Mycroft Holmes' perspective, with the additional twist that makes these stories so special.

6. "The Witch of Greenwich" by Gerard Dole recounts a rather sensational adventure shared by Billy, the page boy, with Sherlock Holmes, Inspector Gregson and a detective from across the channel, about the black death and `sorcery'.

7. "Years Ago and in a Different Place" by Michael Kurland tells us about the tragedy that led to the sharp divergence of path, between Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty, explaining Holmes' misogyny as well.

8. "Mrs. Hudson Reminiscences" by Linda Robertson presents the `could-have-happened' realistic account of the adventures of Mrs. Hudson and how Holmes played the role of the knight in shining armour in it.

9. "Cabaret Aux Assassins" by Cara Black is a melodramatized and over-romantic story depicting the events and conspiracies leading to the one-night "an affair to remember" between Irene Adler and Sherlock Holmes, with the consequences.

10. "A Study in Orange" by Peter Tremayne is a rich account of the failure of Sherlock Holmes at the hands of Colonel Sebastian Moron and how it effected the course of the Irish history.

11. "The Riddle of the Young Protestor" by Michael Mallory is a `singular' story where the 2nd Mrs. Watson is the protagonist and Holmes is almost the spectator, in an adventure concerning the fabled treasure of the Duke of Monmouth.

12. "The Adventure of the Celestial Snows" by George Alec Effinger is a Wold-Newton delight in the sense that it brings together Sherlock Holmes and Fu-Manchu, through Reginald Musgrave.

13. "And the Others" by C. D. Ewing is the only light-hearted attempt in this anthology as it presents Sherlock Holmes from the perspectives of Inspector Lestrade, King of Bohemia, Stamford (with an astonishing twist to the historic encounter that took place at "Bart's" between Holmes and Watson), Conan Doyle and James Mortimer.

All in all, this anthology is a veritable feast for Sherlock Holmes aficionados, esp. for those who won't be affronted by being presented with the master's image drawn from unusual angles. Highly recommended!
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
High Hopes, Not Completely Dashed 6 Nov 2007
By Kindle Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I had high hopes for this title. If they were not fulfilled, neither were they completely dashed. Several of the stories were quite good.

In particular, I would recommend the excellent "The Riddle of the Young Protestor" by Michael Mallory. I can't wait to read more these charming 'second Mrs. Watson' stories. It was pitch-perfect.

I did NOT like "Cabaret Aux Assassins." It felt as though Sherlock Holmes was just tacked on to a suddenly-French-spy Irene Adler story. Although the 'flashback' telling was smart, the idea of a child for the two of them was not original, and the handling of their affair felt 'phoned in' to me, and not handled with any real respect for the original Sherlock Holmes stories. Avoid!

"Mrs. Hudson Reminiscences" was a cozy, enjoyable tale told with a great 'voice' for Mrs. Hudson.

"The Adventure of the Forgotten Umbrella" was clever and fun, a great read. It tells the story of an 'unsolved' mystery mentioned in the Holmes stories.

"And the Others" was funny, featuring quotes from people who knew Holmes (and didn't think much of him), newspaper style. The psychologist-type fellow at the end was outrageously funny, with the "I shall say no more" prim insinuation he made about Mr. Holmes shooting Queen Victoria's initials in his wall.

"The Incident of the Impecunious Chevalier" was a fun story of Poe's detective Dupin and Sherlock Holmes. It was creepy and biazzre, and Holmes was *not* the hero, but somehow it worked.

"The Dollmaker of Marigold Walk" made me laugh. Sherlock Holmes... and Mrs. Hudson?! I recently read another theory online that linked Watson and Mrs. Hudson. I suppose people want to rope every Holmes character into relationships these days, but I find it silly. Otherwise, the story was okay, but not what I would have expected from a superb author like Barbara Hambly.

"Call me Wiggins" was pretty good, and "Mycroft's Great Game" was okay, although its ending did not quite hold up to its amazing beginning, in my opinion.

The other stories held nothing memorable for me. I would not recommend buying this book, but by all means borrow it from the library, if only to read "The Riddle of the Young Protestor."
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Don't bother 11 May 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
For want of a new Sherlock Holmes pastiche collection to read, I decided to give this one a try after reading about it in Booklist. The premise sounded interesting; alas, it plays out poorly. Holmes is so far out of character in most of these that it's not even funny. Yes, these stories are supposed to be other characters' views of him, but they could have at least retained some spirit of Doyle's original. Instead many writers take Holmes' character and run with it. For instance, the story involving Irene Adler's relationship with Holmes is not only unoriginal but ridiculous. I hope that there will be a new collection of pastiches, one that vastly outweighs this one in the quality department.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
"That book made me positively ill!"... 14 Jan 2008
By CHOI PA IL - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
said Sherlock Holmes in "A Study in Scarlet" and I totally agree with him about this book. The idea sounded promising but rendering is quite dissapointing.
I cannot better agree with other reviewer's comment -'Holmes is so far out of character in most of these that it's not even funny'.
Only the six stories of the anthology deserve printing and the three stories among them are worth reading.

"the Incident of the Impecunious Chevalier" by Richard Lupoff is a sort of literary joke. Sherlock Holmes and his precursor C. August Dupin set off in search of the Maltase Falcon & succeed the mission but......I think this is the best piece of the anthology.
The characterization of "the Doll Maker of Marigold Walk" by Barbara Hambly is faithful to the original, but the plot lacks ingenuity.
"the Adventure of the Forgotten Umbrella" by Mel Gilden and "Mrs. Hudson reminisces" by Linda Robertson are simply dull and vapid. (by the way, It appears to me that the author of the latter story can't know South Downs from Surrey).
"Call me Wiggins" by Norman Schreiber is not bad but rather lengthy & I don't think an ordinary reader of sherlock holmes pastiches (like me) is very anxious to know about the detailed private life of Lewis Carroll.
"Mycroft's Great Game" by Gary Lovisi begins comically but ends rather sentimentally to my dissapoinment.
The Plot of "the Witch of Greenwich" by Gerard Dole is highly improbable, almost impossible & I could' t even finish "Cabaret Aus Assassins" by Cara Black!
"Years Ago in A Different Place" by Michael Kurland tells the truth behind the rift between Sherlock Holmes and Prof. Moriarty. I think the explanation Kurland provides is rather simplistic but as a whole, the story is an interesting apocrypha.
"A Study in Orange" by Peter Tremeyne presents a conspiracy surrounding Irish Home Rule. The Plot is pluasible & the trick is simple but impressive. The narrator(colonel Moran)'s mocking tones made me giggle! Another pastiche of Tremeyne's which recounts Moran's misadventure, "Affray at the Kildare Street Club(included in "the Mammoth Book of the New Sherlock Holmes Adventures edited by Mike Ashley)" is highly recommended.
"the Riddle of the Young Protestor" by Michael Mallory is a treasure hunting story like "the Musgrave Ritual". The riddle is good & makes sense, but the characterization doesn't ring true & the overall circumstances are not convincing.
"the Adventure of the Celestial Snow" by Alec Effinger tries to bring together Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Fu Manchu but the combination doesn't work out and the narrative is rambling. If you want to know about the confrontation between the Great Detective & the Insidious Chinese Villain, then I recommend "Ten Years Beyond Baker Street" the excellent pastiche by Cay Van Ash, instead.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Awful 3 Jan 2005
By G - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Some stories are just awful and some too speculative.

Some deviates too much from the original Cannon characterization.

Overall too shallow and not a very thought provoking views on some Cannon characters. Instead I recommend people to read the original Sherlock Holmes.
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