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My Name is Mable - The Complete Collection


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Product details

  • Audio CD (15 Mar 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Spectrum Audio
  • ASIN: B0000TZ7TA
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 248,878 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Who Wouldn't Love A Man Like That (First Version) 2:45£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. You Made A Fool Out Of Me (Single Version) 2:22£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. (I Guess There's) No Love (Single Version Without Strings) 2:53£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Looking For A Man (Single Version) 2:34£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. (I Guess There's) No Love (Single Version With Strings) 2:32£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Actions Speak Louder Than Words (Single Version) 2:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Take Me (Single Version) 3:08£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. I'm Yours, You're Mine [feat. Sammy Ward] 2:24£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. I'm Finally Through With You 2:09£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Look At Me 2:11£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. More Lovin' 2:48£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. My Name Is Mable 3:02£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. My Thanks 2:33£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. True Love (Can Be Found) 2:13£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen15. We Belong Together 2:24£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen16. You Never Miss A Good Thing 3:21£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Who Wouldn't Love A Man Like That (1963 Single Version) 2:45£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Say You'll Never Let Me Go (Single Version) 2:23£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen19. Meet Me Half Way 2:40£0.79  Buy MP3 

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lozarithm VINE VOICE on 2 July 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Mable John's recording career began at Motown. But although she was there for six years, when she moved to Stax in 1966, the label with which she is most associated, she had released only four singles on Tamla. Three of these were released before 1962 and the most recent in 1963, itself a remake of her first single, Who Wouldn't Love A Man Like That. When she left she had been silent to the record-buying public for three years, while cash registers were ringing with the record sales of Mary Wells and the Miracles, Marvin and Martha.

Behind the scenes, though, from the start, she had been busily recording with her mentor Berry Gordy, Andre Williams, Mickey Stevenson, Holland and Dozier, Clarence Paul and even a teenage Stevie Wonder, and as well as Berry Gordy's piano playing augmenting the Funk Brothers, she had the Supremes or the Temptations helping out on backing vocals for some tracks.

This album is subtitled 'The Complete Collection' and rounds up all released and unreleased completed masters to so far show up in the vaults (with Motown you never know what may be uncovered), 19 tracks in all including both variants of the single No Love.

Of the unreleased tracks only a couple are dated, and these are from late 1962. However in the booklet notes, Mable John says, "Most of the material was recorded at United Sound. When we moved to the now-famous house at 2648 West Grand Boulevard, a few songs were cut there." As we can deduce that five of the tracks must have been made at the Hitsville Studios, in the basement at 2648, it seems likely that many of the others date from 1960-1961, rather than the dry period of no releases after 1963, and represent another casualty of Motown's embarrassment of riches.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David R. Bishop VINE VOICE on 2 Nov 2008
Format: Audio CD
If the world had been different in the early '60s, then Mable John would be the household name that Diana Ross is. The truth is that back then, the mainstream record buying public were not ready for undiluted R&B.

This is the Motown sound before it was sweetened and lightened, before the infectious all register back beat was added. This is real Detroit R&B.

Poor Mable never even made the national R&B chart at Motown. It was the dream of Motown owner Berry Gordy, to promote and manage one female superstar. In the beginning he thought that it would be Mable, then when Mary Wells had hit after hit, beginning in 1962, he thought it was her. After she left the label, it became The Supremes, especially Diana Ross. Lets face it, he did not do too badly with her.

Mable is the sister of '50s R&B star Little Willie John, which speaks volumes about her pedegree and her style.

It became increasingly obvious as the years went by, that Mable and Motown just did not fit together. She left the label amicably and moved to Stax, where sadly, she did not do much better.

Mable was Motown's very first first lady. Don't expect the sort of music you associate with the label, but it is wonderful music, and it is fascinating to wonder about how different things could have been.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard on 2 May 2008
Format: Audio CD
Which is what 999 out of every 1000 would say and its hardly surprising when you consider that her only single issued here was on the Stax label long after all this material-Your good thing is about to end.
This week Mabel John is on Jool's Holland's LATER-so he's now heard of her and though his show is mainly full of today's people-who I only ever hear of if they do any Beatles covers-there have been the odd singers from the past like Tom Jones or Tina Turner or James Taylor.This could be the first time for a complete unknown
Its rather a surprise to see a name which is virtually unknown to the masses.
So as Mabel John begins recording for Motown her more famous brother Little Willie John is in a jail where he's serving time for murder and its where he dies. In 1962 he'd charted a couple of times on the King label and is famous for having cut the first version of Fever and Leave my kitten alone.
1962 was really the Golden Age of Motown and any music made there reflected the Uptown Soul sounds of the day-very easy to digest.
Not surpisingly knowing how the company worked Mabel John was soon put on the backburner after the success of Mary Wells.
But did they have to print all over her face? Looks terrible!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
A rare voice 12 Mar 2005
By T. A. Shepherd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Sister of Little Willie, Mable John never got her due recognition for her Motown and Stax recordings, although she is more known for the latter. This disc, however focuses on the Motown years before signing with Stax in the mid-60's. There's some great stuff here and you don't have to look hard for it. I Guess There's No Love is probably more familiar to those who purchased Switched on Blues in the late 80's when George Solomon was allowed to run wild in the Motown vaults. This disc contained stereo mixes that differed from the original versions quite a bit. On this, The Complete Collection, the compiler refers to the mono 45 versions both with strings and without. Mable's voice is both edgy and confident. She strikes a chord no other singer gets near and there are plenty of Rhythm and Blues gems to soak up. Action Speaks Louder Than Words is another one of her early singles for the label (You can also refer to the Complete Motown Singles Volume 1 1959-1961, Motown Select). Action is much like the recordings Bobby Bland and Junior Parker were putting out during the early 60's and was an early blueprint for Mary Wells' recording of Let Your Concience Be Your Guide. Looking For A Man, a track where Mable is backed up by The Supremes, rides along a strict shuffle beat, a technique Brian Wilson would later use quite a bit. You Made A Fool Out Of Me shows what great interpreter of the blues she could be, while the equally bluesy Take Me is a strong vehicle for a plea for attention. Here she is backed up by The Temptations, while Who Wouldn't Love A Man Like That is a second number that gets two slots on the disc: One recorded in 1960 and another in 1963. Mable John is a rare voice that is easily recognized. Like Sammy Ward, Mable is one of the first soloists to record for Motown. This is one great collection and now I'll have to order the Stax disc!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Early Motown 11 Jan 2007
By G. Carter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a great collection of early Motown when the sound was more raw, not yet polished, Mable John's soulful voice are nice on these rarely heard songs, some even feature the Supremes and Temptations on background vocals, and a duet with another early Motown artist Sammy Ward, if you are a Motown fan or Motown collector check out one of the first artists for the label and listen to the early of years of Motown with Mable!
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Motown years in full 2 July 2007
By Lozarithm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mable John's recording career began at Motown. But although she was there for six years, when she moved to Stax in 1966, the label with which she is most associated, she had released only four singles on Tamla. Three of these were released before 1962 and the most recent in 1963, itself a remake of her first single, Who Wouldn't Love A Man Like That. When she left she had been silent to the record-buying public for three years, while cash registers were ringing with the record sales of Mary Wells and the Miracles, Marvin and Martha.

Behind the scenes, though, from the start, she had been busily recording with her mentor Berry Gordy, Andre Williams, Mickey Stevenson, Holland and Dozier, Clarence Paul and even a teenage Stevie Wonder, and as well as Berry Gordy's piano playing augmenting the Funk Brothers, she had the Supremes or the Temptations helping out on backing vocals for some tracks.

This album is subtitled 'The Complete Collection' and rounds up all released and unreleased completed masters to so far show up in the vaults (with Motown you never know what may be uncovered), 19 tracks in all including both variants of the single No Love.

Of the unreleased tracks only a couple are dated, and these are from late 1962. However in the booklet notes, Mable John says, "Most of the material was recorded at United Sound. When we moved to the now-famous house at 2648 West Grand Boulevard, a few songs were cut there." As we can deduce that five of the tracks must have been made at the Hitsville Studios, in the basement at 2648, it seems likely that many of the others date from 1960-1961, rather than the dry period of no releases after 1963, and represent another casualty of Motown's embarrassment of riches.

Of most interest of these are an upbeat duet with Singin' Sammy Ward; the first version of Able Mable, an autobiographical song written by Mable and her mother Lillie, which was later to be a single on Stax; her version of You Never Miss A Good Thing, a Smokey/Berry song that Eugene Remus had out in 1960 and that became a Miracles B-side in 1962; and an unreleased early Dozier-Holland song, Meet Me Half Way, which had also been recorded in 1962 by Kim Weston. This closes the album and an important chapter in her career, now finally available for our evaluation.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Pre-Motown Sound 6 Dec 2006
By Truth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mable John has had several careers: She was a member of the United Five, a gospel group with her four siblings (including R&B singer Little Willie John); she was the first solo female act signed to Berry Gordy's Tamala Records (his pre-Motown company); she recorded with Isaac Hayes & David Porter on Stax Records; she was one of Ray Charles's Raelette's for over a decade, into the 1970s; she is a minister; she has a Ph.D. in counseling. This compilation covers 1960-1963, her years on Tamla.

MY NAME IS MABLE: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION - 19 HI-FIDELITY SOUL CLASSICS consists of 19 songs, including 2 versions of both "No Love" and "Who Wouldn't Love a Man Like That". Disc is packaged in a clear jewel case. Booklet includes some recording dates, no recording personnel information, an essay by David Ritz consisting of mostly a first-person account by Dr. Mable John, and several small black-and-white photographs. The sound quality is good.

The songs here (most previously unreleased) are not really "Soul classics". The music here is more of a Do-Wop variety; more Rhythm & Blues and Pop than Soul. There is little resemblance to what would later be known as the Motown Sound. Her recordings here are not dissimilar to what Ruth Brown did in the 1950s. While Mable's voice is pleasant, she is not a vocal powerhouse, nor is her voice particularly distinctive.

This collection includes "I'm Yours, You're Mine" (duet with Singin' Sammy Ward), the 1963 version of "Who Wouldn't Love a Man Like That" co-produced by a teenage Stevie Wonder, and the original version of "Able Mable" (this version called "My Name Is Mable").

For Mable John's 1966-1968 Soul recordings on Stax (and some Bluesy tunes), get the compilation "Stay Out of the Kitchen" [1993, Fantasy].

Music: 1 and half stars
Packaging: 3 stars
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
classic rare motown 7 Jun 2007
By Michael Payne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am not paricularly into the blues, but I was really impressed with

the few blues sessions that have surfaced on Hattie Littles from motown's

early era, such as "Love trouble and Heartach' and her smoking version

of Barrett Stong's"Money". The combination of blues and Motown is awsome,

mainly because of the great instumentation. I may not be the right person

to review blues, but I do Know motown. Mable John sounds like a great artist with a great voice. The problem I have with this cd is that it

sounds very dated. In other words it was recorded before the motown

sound was established. So maby if you just like the blues, you'll like it,

but if you like the motown sound, this is deffinitly not it.

The only motown related song on hear is Marvin Gaye's"It hurt me too".
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