My Life as a Hooker and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £1.60 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
My Life as a Hooker: When... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

My Life as a Hooker: When a Middle-Aged Bloke Discovered Rugby Paperback – 6 Feb 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.39
£2.01 £0.38
£6.39 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

My Life as a Hooker: When a Middle-Aged Bloke Discovered Rugby + The Final Whistle: The Great War in Fifteen Players + Bulgarian Bruises, Bloodgate and Other Stories,: The Changing World of Rugby
Price For All Three: £23.37

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Summersdale (6 Feb. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849532117
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849532112
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 164,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'If this is what a midlife crisis does for you, I want one.' --Luke Benedict, rugby writer for the Daily Mail

'Steven Gauge writes with charm wit and intelligence and real insight.' --Samira Ahmed, journalist and broadcaster

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Catherine on 22 May 2012
Format: Paperback
If laughter is the best medicine then this book should be available on the NHS. It is a joy: very funny, hugely likeable and tells a cracking good story. In a friendly, witty and engaging style, Steven Gauge takes us on a rollicking journey from his first days on the rugby pitch to his hard-won heyday as Captain of the Fourths. This is the Dad's Army of sports books. I found myself caring about this motley crew and willing them to hang in there and stop losing.

Describing himself as a hobbit, as he is short but determined, Gauge is totally honest about both triumphs and disasters. Gauge is a human cartoon: repeatedly flattened, he never gives up. He involves us by giving advice, too: `Once you are on the ground it is probably better to stay there for a little while...'

Unlike a cartoon, Gauge gets hurt. Yet like a hobbit, he is brave. Confused, but determined to help his team to win, or at least lose better, he decides to read books on sports psychology, after struggling to give a good half-time pep talk: `As I began to ramble, I realised I hadn't the faintest idea why we were losing...'

"If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly," wrote G.K.Chesterton. This book is a timely reminder in a world obsessed with perfection and celebrity of what life-enhancing good times you can have doing something for fun. At the same time, how a hobbit shapes up as a rugby captain makes a great story. Watching him try hard to get better is hilarious and sometimes unexpectedly moving. And if you've ever had to recruit people for a team, the chapter on 'Captain's Poker' will strike you as inspired.

This book makes you want to turn off the tv and run around in the mud. Then again, sitting in a chair and laughing this much is a pretty good workout.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Morris on 27 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Be very careful where you read this book.......it had me laughing out loud at times as I followed the fortunes of Warlingham's Fourth XV.....!
What does a man do when in sight of middle age and with a successful career, things start to get harder? The answer seems to try something different, some more sensible than others......It can be a radical career change, taking up a completely new hobby, becoming an Open University student, or going in for tattoing and wearing leather...
Thus it was with Steven Gauge who at the not so tender age of 35 took up......playing rugby
In the professional game you are hanging up your rugby boots at this age, such are its demands and I have to admit I wince at times when I watch a game and see them go right into each other or ferociously engage in the scrums.....It really is a game for the fit
Things are however quite different it seems in the lower leagues of the amateur game where you have some seriously unfit men playing rugby.......a game for 'all sorts and conditions of men' of all ages, and sizes and getting fitter into the bargain, and making good friends on the way. So you're well into your 50s, 3 stone overweight, and amble from scrum to scrum? Not a problem! somewhere a team will have a place for you
Even at this level though, rugby demands a certain amount of commitment, with two training sessions a week and a Saturday game
On the way Steven has such a lot of fun... and pain. He gets hurt,he has to leave the field on account of injury, someone takes a punch at him, but then again he finds he has made friends for life and revels in the camaraderie that this sport is famous for
It is very funny but with some serious undercurrents.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark Dyer on 25 Dec. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
A highly amusing book. Whether you know the subject because you've 'been there', or you empathise as middle-aged man looking for something, or are just wanting to be entertained there is something in this for you. There are so many quips and true-isms; one of my favourites early in the book spoke of others' lack of interaction:

"In the modern world it seems far more socially acceptable to burn off the calories in a world of your own, iPod strapped to your upper arm and headphones blocking your ears as you pound away on a treadmill in an expensive gym. In these soulless temples to body facism, woe betide anyone who tries to start a conversation or offer to buy a round of drinks."

The time when the tour caught up with S-club 7 was also good value ...........

I too was an inbetweener who learned a lot of life's lessons in a rugby club, whether how/when to buy a round of drinks to why it's unwise to pick on a scrum half who has his two props beside him (wait till later - obviously). Now I'm wondering whether to return as a silver scrummager......probably best not to, or is it?

I especially liked the motto of the 4ths, and the techniques of captain's poker were so, so true. Enjoyable passages included the exchange of text messages as the captain worked hard to assemble the Clapham boys, the Inbetweeners, and those simply hiding from Saturday afternoon shopping.

Other rugby books seem to focus on drinking and the sometimes juvenile pranks that some get up to; full credit to Gaugey for the quality of the writing and for showing that there is a strong, grown-up, undercurrent to the sport.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback