Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
My Favorite Things (Special Edition)
 
See larger image
 

My Favorite Things (Special Edition)

24 Jan 2009 | Format: MP3

4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.02 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
13:44
2
5:45
3
11:37
4
9:41
5
2:47
6
3:02


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 Feb 1998
  • Release Date: 27 Feb 1998
  • Label: Rhino Atlantic
  • Copyright: 2005 Atlantic Recording Corp. Manufactured & Marketed by Warner Strategic Marketing.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 46:36
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001F9TOCU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 44,232 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Mike Cormack on 22 Sep 2008
Format: Audio CD
Jazz musicians, from Louis Armstrong to Miles Davis covering Michael Jackson's "Human Nature", often used standards as launch pads for explorations, and Trane does exactly that in this wonderful album. The key track is of course the title track: you will probably know it from The Sound Of Music (though I did not when I first heard it). But Trane makes it all his own: in a 3/4 waltz time, Trane takes the harmony with a soprano sax (a gift from Miles Davis) while McCoy Tyner plays some astonishing long solos on a close-miked piano and comps the rhythm while Trane solos to see the song out. What's fascinating is the way that Trane plays with the melody, bending and misshaping it, and how Tyner's solo stretches out, almost peering towards infinity, yet never becomes boring. Trane continued to use My Favourite Things as a concert standard thorughout his life - but forever making it anew, as he explored into dissonance, chromaticism and the free jazz of "Ascension" that he is perhaps better known for. (His version from the Village Vanguard near the end of his life is breathtakingly powerful but extremely dissonant - not easy listening!).

"Ev'rytime We Say Goodbye" is a lush tune, a cover of the Cole Porter song. It's a great reminder that while Trane was known as being a hugely powerful sax player, he always loved playing ballads. It's not quite up to "After The Rain" from "Impressions", perhaps his greatest ballad, but it's not far off for its sheer emotive quality, similar to "Blues In Green" from Davis' "Kind Of Blue" (which Trane played on, of course).

"But Not For Me" and "Summertime" are more energetic, with the latter having a bouncy exhuberance, and the former a manic compulsiveness.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By pampusgirl@yahoo.com on 30 Jun 2001
Format: Audio CD
If Miles Davis' "Kind of Blue" is generally regarded als the best jazz album ever made, "My favorite things" by John Coltrane has to come second. Containing four quite contrasting songs, this album sounds as a coherent piece of music and always keeps the flow going. The first two songs "My favorite things" and the Cole Porter cover "Every time we say goodbye" are my personal favorites, because you hear John Coltrane on soprano sax and McCoy Tyner on piano who plays some brilliant solo's. The other two tracks are in a bit brighter tempo, but equally good. The best about this album however is, that because it's so stunningly perfect, you can play it anytime, anywhere, and you'll never get bored of it. On the contrary, the more you'll listen to it, the more you'll appreciate it. No serious jazz collection can be without this album. Buy it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Mandello on 4 Jun 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you are reading this review wondering where to start with Coltrane, this is a pretty good place. If the title isn't enough of a clue, the track listing should help you figure out that this is Coltrane playing standards. And playing them as melodic standards, not the free jazz you may have been fearing. It's an enormously accessible album - I defy anyone to resist the Cole Porter classic Every Time We say Goodbye - and a great showcase for Coltrane's skills. Unusually, the two "bonus tracks" even merit inclusion. It should leave you wanting to hear more Coltrane - I'd recommend "Crescent" after this - and maybe, like me you'll want to hear more of McCoy Tyner who plays piano wonderfully on both albums.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keith M TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Mar 2013
Format: Audio CD
In a way, one could almost say that an album where John Coltrane covers, arguably, four of the most popular songs of the 20th century (albeit of varying heritages), in this case Rogers & Hammerstein's title song, Gershwin's Summertime and If Not For Me and Cole Porter's Everytime We Say Goodbye, the listener is being granted something of an easy win. However, whilst this album provides a good (more accessible) way in to Coltrane's music, being built around a series of infectious (and generally well known) melodies, there is also a lot going on in his band of MyCoy Tyner (piano), Steve Davis (bass) and Elvin Jones (drums). My Favourite Things is also a notable album since it was the first time Coltrane was recorded on soprano saxophone, a sound which marked the player's gradual move towards more non-Western influences that was to be further developed on the Africa/Brass and Olé Coltrane albums.

This album is probably at its most conventional during the sublime, and relatively concise, interpretation of Everytime We Say Goodbye (which, given that it is one of my all-time favourite songs was never going to miss the target). Coltrane's soprano playing here is in its most deliberate and melody-following mode, which simply (and strangely) serves to make it all the more emotionally devastating, and provides a perfect platform for McCoy Tyner's equally impressive solo. Of course, Coltrane's version of the title song, apart from being an amazing interpretation of what is essentially The Sound Of Music's childlike ditty, was the piece of music that brought Coltrane to more popular attention and was to feature as an integral part of his live performances.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?