£10.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

My Father's Keeper: The Children of Nazi Leaders - An Intimate History of Damage and Denial: How Nazis' Children Grew Up with Parents' Guilt Paperback – 4 Jul 2002


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£10.99
£5.25 £0.01

Frequently Bought Together

My Father's Keeper: The Children of Nazi Leaders - An Intimate History of Damage and Denial: How Nazis' Children Grew Up with Parents' Guilt + Let Me Go + The Himmler Brothers: A German Family History
Price For All Three: £30.47

Buy the selected items together


Earn a Free Kindle Book
Earn a Free Kindle Book
Buy a book between now and 31 March and receive a promotional code good for one free Kindle book. Terms and conditions apply. Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus; New Ed edition (4 July 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349114579
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349114576
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 1.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 346,839 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Fascinating. (Professor Eric Hobsbawm)

Highly interesting ... what emerges not only casts light on the mentality and psychology of "Nazi children" in later life, but also on the wider issue of lingering trauma of the Third Reich. (Professor Ian Kershaw)

MY FATHER'S KEEPER is a worthwhile read. (SUNDAY BUSINESS POST)

It is an absorbing read, told with sympathy and discretion. (MAIL ON SUNDAY)

Amazing stories (FINANCIAL TIMES)

Book Description

* Introduction by Daniel Goldhagen, author HITLER'S WILLING EXECUTIONERS.

* With TV series such as Hitler's Henchman, The World at War, Hitler's Women - interest in WWII has never been higher.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
I'VE KNOWN KARL-OTTO Saur a pretty long time, and pretty well too, as I thought. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gogol VINE VOICE on 14 July 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thought it was just me when I first read this book and found it so confusing until I had a look through the reviews of several other people to see I was not alone in this.

Perhaps the original German is better written but sadly, this does not do it justice which is a great pity as this had the potential to be a fascinating read.

The book centers around follow up interviews the author made with various children of leading men in the Nazi German government. While some have come to terms with both themselves and their fathers past others have remained bitter to this day while some even continue to support, at least in principle the theories of their father.

Of particular interest were Wolf Rudiger Hess who refused to serve in the army out of protest at his fathers imprisonment while Martin Bormann entered the church and to some extent, found a peace with himself Gurden Himmler and Niklas Frank still suffered from inner battles with themselves on how to reconcile the father with the man that the world has come to know.

Fascinating book but you will have to read it twice not least because the narrative is so damn confusing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. E. A. Marks on 3 Sep 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well we all want to know secretly, don't we? Little Edda Goering who was so trumpeted in the regime, little Gudrun Himmler, photographed with her Daddy somewhere inside a concentration camp! They are fascinating, and this book is extremely interesting and informative. I like the fact that it contains the first interviews they gave, to the author's father, only twenty years after it was all over, and how those the author himself managed to speak to all this time later have inevitably suffered from being who they are - possibly except for Edda Goering, who seems to have gone happily through life with her surname.

There is an air of great sadness in this book and it is a prime example of 'the sins of the father ...', but Stephan Lebert comes across as a very sympathetic interviewer, and anybody who is interested in how the world has moved on from The Third Reich, and how those caught up in it through blood-ties have had to cope with their lives will find it an excellent read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very good read indeed. Interesting to hear about the differing experiences and thoughts of these children of Nazi leaders. I also liked the angle the writer came from by examining the original writings of his father and the changes over time to the newer interviews.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Sep 2001
Format: Hardcover
If you are like me, you know relatively little about the lives of the children of the Nazi leaders. Although their fathers' names live in infamy, the children and their names often survived in obscurity and semi-privacy. This powerful set of interviews from 1959 and 1999-2000 provides a psychological lens to see the children, being a child in general, German society, and the actions of the Allies. In 1959 German journalist, Norbert Lebert, interviewed in a number of children of the Nazi leaders. After his death, Mr. Lebert's son, Stephan, chose to attempt to bring those interviews up to date in 1999-2000. Where he could not (as with Gudrun Himmler and Edda Goring), the younger Mr. Lebert provides a thumbnail history of what is known about the intervening years.
To me, the most interesting parts of the book were 1959 interviews. Mr. Norbert Lebert did a sensitive job of considering the children of the leaders as people rather than as celebrities or subjects of a study. The information he developed was quite extensive, broad, and very interesting.
In each case, the father cast a long shadow onto his children. While very young, these children were usually aware that their fathers were powerful and admired. Some, like Edda Goring, even had celebrity status in their own right. The Allied attempts to prosecute the fathers disrupted the lives of the mothers and their children. Some fathers died by their own hand (like Himmler and Goring), some were hung, while others languished in prison where there could be little contact (like von Schirach and Hess). So to a large extent, these children were fatherless after 1945. After World War II, their fathers' pasts continued to influence their lives, by causing some to be curious, some to scorn them, and others to approve.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback