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My Dearest Minette: Letters Between Charles II and His Sister Henrietta, Duchesse d'Orleans Hardcover – May 1996


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 238 pages
  • Publisher: Peter Owen Publishers (May 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0720609917
  • ISBN-13: 978-0720609912
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 14.6 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,011,665 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Synopsis

A collection of correspondence between Charles II and his sister, most published for the first time in 40 years, with commentary placing the letters in context. The letters reveal details of court life among the royalty in England and France between 1659 and 1670, and show the evolution of the siblings' most significant diplomatic achievement, the

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sean C on 21 May 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is a good book for anyone interested in finding out more about some of the more interesting figures of Restoration-era England. Despite the fact that Norrington is prone to gush at times about the fascination and charm of letters that are, in some cases, little more than quickly dashed-off notes, as a body the collection is quite interesting.
Norrington's strength (and weakness) lies in her ability to string together the letters, filling in the context with incidents in the life of Charles II and his sister, Minette, the two main correspondents. Unfortunately, Norrington uses about a fifth of the footnotes I'd like to have seen. For every anecdote whose provenance she footnotes, there are four she doesn't. There is a bibliography, but some of the unfootnoted incidents are so so vaguely attributed in the text that I'd be hard-pressed to know where to begin searching them out in her sources. She includes no index, either, which is quite frustrating as well.
Still, it's a good read, and those interested in the Restoration would already be in Norrington's debt had she only assembled the letters and nothing more. The book is worth buying just on the strength of the letters, if you can find it for a reasonable price.
It should be emphasized that these letters are most interesting from a historical perspective, however, and not as masterpieces of the art of letter writing. For that, try Charles' and Minette's contemporary, Rochester, in Rochester's letters, edited by Jeremy Treglown.
[This review also posted on Amazon in the US.]
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sean C on 21 May 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is a good book for anyone interested in finding out more about some of the more interesting figures of Restoration-era England. Despite the fact that Norrington is prone to gush at times about the fascination and charm of letters that are, in some cases, little more than quickly dashed-off notes, as a body the collection is quite interesting.
Norrington's strength (and weakness) lies in her ability to string together the letters, filling in the context with incidents in the life of Charles II and his sister, Minette, the two main correspondents. Unfortunately, Norrington uses about a fifth of the footnotes I'd like to have seen. For every anecdote whose provenance she footnotes, there are four she doesn't. There is a bibliography, but some of the unfootnoted incidents are so so vaguely attributed in the text that I'd be hard-pressed to know where to begin searching them out in her sources. She includes no index, either, which is quite frustrating as well.
Still, it's a good read, and those interested in the Restoration would already be in Norrington's debt had she only assembled the letters and nothing more. The book is worth buying just on the strength of the letters, if you can find it for a reasonable price.
It should be emphasized that these letters are most interesting from a historical perspective, however, and not as masterpieces of the art of letter writing. For that, try Charles' and Minette's contemporary, Rochester, in Rochester's letters, edited by Jeremy Treglown.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ms. R. L. Allen on 19 Jun. 2004
Format: Hardcover
What a beautiful and close relationship this brother and sister had. Minette was delightful and witty, just like Charles. I feel I want to know more about her. It is a shame that she was treated so abominably by Monsieur, she put up with so much that you would have thought he would stop chucking his childish mardy strops! A must read for Charles II fans.
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By Joy S. on 14 April 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What a fascinating account of the interchanges between brother and sister, in the middle of court intrigues and politics. Minette must have been an enchanting and very intelligent lady, and an enormous help to her brother.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A fascinating read, but a frustrating history 21 May 2005
By Sean C - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a good book for anyone interested in finding out more about some of the more interesting figures of Restoration-era England. Despite the fact that Norrington is prone to gush at times about the fascination and charm of letters that are, in some cases, little more than quickly dashed-off notes, as a body the collection is quite interesting.

Norrington's strength (and weakness) lies in her ability to string together the letters, filling in the context with incidents in the life of Charles II and his sister, Minette, the two main correspondents. Unfortunately, Norrington uses about a fifth of the footnotes I'd like to have seen. For every anecdote whose provenance she footnotes, there are four she doesn't. There is a bibliography, but some of the unfootnoted incidents are so so vaguely attributed in the text that I'd be hard-pressed to know where to begin searching them out in her sources. She includes no index, either, which is quite frustrating as well.

Still, it's a good read, and those interested in the Restoration would already be in Norrington's debt had she only assembled the letters and nothing more. The book is worth buying just on the strength of the letters, if you can find it for a reasonable price.

It should be emphasized that these letters are most interesting from a historical perspective, however, and not as masterpieces of the art of letter writing. For that, try Charles' and Minette's contemporary, Rochester, in Rochester's letters, edited by Jeremy Treglown.
Charles II's private life. 3 July 2014
By Steven R. Brattman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Insight into the mind and heart of England's Merry Monarch.
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