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My Boy Lollipop: The Best Of Millie Small
 
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My Boy Lollipop: The Best Of Millie Small

18 Jan. 2010 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £3.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2010
  • Release Date: 18 Jan. 2010
  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 2010 Spectrum Music
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 46:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0033COTQI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 64,131 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Dan Davids on 21 Jan. 2010
Format: Audio CD
It's difficult for many younger listeners to appreciate just what a major star Millie was back in the sixties. Although she only managed a trio of UK chart hits, she was responsible for introducing much of the world to Ska with the mammoth hit, 'My Boy Lollipop', which along with her subsequent successes, 'Sweet William' and 'Bloodshot Eyes', is included on this long overdue 'best of'.

Other fine Ska sides included are You Better Forget' and 'Oh Henry', along with excellent versions of 'Tom Hark', 'Wings Of A Dove', 'Be My Guest' and 'Sugar Dandy', plus a wonderful take on 'Hey Boy - Hey Girl', on which she's accompanied by a youthful Jimmy Cliff. Elsewhere are beautiful versions of Johnny Ace's 'Pledging My Love' and the Ivory Joe Hunter classic, 'Since I Met You Baby', both of which also feature Jackie Edwards, with Jazz guitarist Ernest Ranglin providing some truly sublime touches to the latter.

Ernest Ranglin also features prominently on another R&B cover, 'What Am I Living For', while Edwards' third contribution to the set is the Northern Soul stomper, 'Ooh Ooh'. Comprising the remainder of the CD are Millie's first Fontana 45, 'Don't You Know', a couple of nice floor-fillers ('My Street' and 'Killer Joe'), a fine girl group number in 'Chilly Kisses', an excellent interpretation of 'I'm Blue' from the Spencer Davis Group's debut LP and finally, the original backing track for 'My Boy Lollipop', replete with the first (unused) harmonica solo.

This budget-priced CD is unbelievable value and long suffering fans can only hope it proves to be the first of more collections focusing upon Jamaica's First Lady of Ska!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Siriam TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 Jun. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I remember the title track when it first hit and also the way many people had fond memories across the 60s at they grew older of its happy impact. This owed a lot to the fun element Millie used to deliver the lyrics and the stomping music and harmonica playing (all explained in the notes as to how this came about) which was much better than a lot of other 1964 hits, when single releases were a very competitive market. Sadly little else was heard or known to most record buyers and the further big hits never materialised though later success followed for others from a Jamaican ska background, notably Desmond Dekker. That big gap is all put to rights by this fulsome compilation of all her 60s output. I can add little to what the other reviewers have stated - all the music carries a happy punch whether singing solo or duetting with other UK based black male singers (Jackie Edwards and Jimmy Cliff), orchestrations reflecting the strong West Indies music ska connections and production teams under the ever hustling young Chris Blackwell whose Jamaican connections made the UK end work. An amazing slice of a unique talent who probably suffered at the hands of the endless gigs and touring and poor promotion if the sleeve notes are to be believed.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 2 Feb. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Millie Small remains a star in spite of the fact that she has rarely appeared in public since the early 70s and her last new single (the excellent 'Honey Hush' - not on this collection) was in 1971.

A certain momentum has built up behind Millie on You Tube where she has received millions of hits, mainly for the title track of this album, but some of her other singles have also received considerable exposure. This compilation presents a good overview of her career, post Studio One, and many listeners who only know one song by her will be surprised by the excellence of her other material. As well as her other 2 UK chart hits, Sweet William and Bloodshot Eyes it includes her own compositions 'Don't You Know' (her first UK recorded single release) and the excellent Oh Henry, plus a track from her album of Fats Domino songs and her Northern Soul classic duet with Jackie Edwards Ooh Ooh. Other noteworthy tracks include the original ska version of 'Tom Hark', later successfully covered by the Pirahnas and a striking version of 'Chilly Kisses'. Naturally on a one volume set there are omissions; e.g her classic early Jamaican chart hit 'We'll Meet' with Roy Panton and her other Jamaican duets with Owen Gray etc. and her latter day reggae singles such as 'Enoch Power'; a 1970 song by Millie calling for tolerance in the face of the (then) current phenomenom of crowds of anti-immigrant protesters to chant the name of the controversial politician Enoch Powell. However, a 2 disc compilation of further material is planned by Trojan.

Mention should be made of the excellent production values of this set, with wonderful sleeve notes by Laurence Cane-Honeysett, which bring us up to date with the news that Millie is back in the recording studio after nearly 4 decades.
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Format: Audio CD
The surprise success of Jamaican ex patriate Millie Small with what was her 2nd single meant she was part of the British Invasion with a song which had been first made in 1956 by an unknown Pixie Girl called Barbie Gaye and a total flop.Quite how it ended up in the U K has never been explained but the song was written by members of a doowop group called the Cadillacs.Because of the vast amounts of American R & B filtering through to the Carribean the single by Barbie Gaye was at least known of
The actual style of the music was known at the time as Bluebeat in the U K and Ska came from Jamaica's attempts to copy the music of Fats Domino.Later Millie would cut an LP of Fats Domino songs some of which are on this CD.
By the end of the 60s the music of Jamaica would generally be known as Reggae but apart from Millie it was never that big in the States.Possibly Millie was seen as a Pixie which explains why both Annette and Tracey Dey made singles called Carribean Ska and Ska Diddle.America also had its token reggae star in Johnny Nash
A recent interview on line with Tracey Dey-who would now be in her late 50s-mentioned her single of Ska Diddle as an attempt by her writers to copy the sound of Ska.
One of her more unusual recordings was Tom Hark originally a South African instrumental-here it has words and was given a higher profile when New Wave band the Piranhas covered it in the 80s
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