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Mutant Message down under Paperback – 1 Aug 1995

70 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1 Aug 1995
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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 187 pages
  • Publisher: HarperPaperbacks; 1st HarperPerennial Ed edition (1 Aug. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060926317
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060926311
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 14 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,134,656 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"A powerful book. A beautiful tale of a woman's mystical journey" -- Marianne Williamson --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Author

This book is a wiork of fiction inspired by my experiences in Australia. It could have taken place in Africa or South America or anywhere where the true meaning of civilisation is still alive. It is for the reader to recieve his or her own message from my story.

Born empty handed,
Die empty handed.
I witnessed life at its fullest,
Empty handed. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A. M. Terry on 27 Nov. 2008
Format: Paperback
When a friend lent me this book, recommending it, he mentioned the controversy around it. I looked up the author on Wikipedia and read the scathing commentary, which almost put me off reading the book. I'm glad my curiosity prevailed, because it's worth reading. The book conveys some important messages about the way Western "civilisation" needs to recover our connection with the natural world, and it does so with great poetic simplicity.

The Wikipedia entry makes it sound as though this is a bit of corporate marketing literature, when it is quite the reverse - and the author is a natural writer: there are some really beautiful passages and perfect descriptions (for example, describing the rare sight of heavy rainclouds: "Occasionally we could even walk under the big overhead shadow, catching the same view an ant might see from the sole of a boot").

If books such as Robert Lawlor's "Voices of the First Day" are taken as a reference point, then it's not inconceivable that a tribe exists that lives in this way. In a way, though, does it matter? Although the outrage about cultural misappropriation is understandable, the heart of this book is clearly sincere, and if it's fictional then it is only employing a well-worn literary device that goes back at least as far as the Bible.

This book may well be a consolidation of the wisdom of various indigenous cultures, from Aboriginal to Native American, but distilling that wisdom into such a direct and beautifully written story is probably just what the doctor ordered when it comes to guiding a way out of the mess we've made - which we urgently need to do, for the sake of our planet and our species.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Sept. 1999
Format: Paperback
Remembering deep essense of what it is to be human - I do not see the experiences of 'the Real People' as exclusive to them. We can all wake up and live in the moment with a concept of 'forever' in all our actions. This book changed my life in getting to feel what it really is to be free, responsible and alive!!! It's an honour to learn about these very special people and be inspired by them. I read it non-stop in an afternoon. I recommend it to everyone!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By zenja on 7 July 2002
Format: Paperback
theres actually alot of contraversy about the origin of the information in this book and whether its fiction or fact.its a simple but fascinating account of one westernised womans journey into the outback of austrailia,whwere she is a guest of the Real People from them she learns a totally different way of life and meaning of life itself.I found it really interesting to have my mind challenged by the way they lived (and still continue to?). Its certainly a refreshing and insightful alternative to our materialstic ,dualistic and goal obssessed culture..i really enjoyed the sequel too.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By sali28@yahoo.com on 12 April 2002
Format: Paperback
A lady goes from America to Australia to meet with some Indigenous people and the book is the story of an amazing and life-changing journey she unexpectedly goes on with them. I was captivated by this book and felt as if I was on the journey with them. Although a 'mutant' she is accepted by the people and they teach her all sorts of things about life. The book was passed to me by a friend and then I passed it on, each reader had written a message inside front page - you might want to share this book & keep it going round!
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Oct. 1999
Format: Paperback
This book puts everything into perspective. It provides a philosophy on life that it is hard to disagree with. An American woman meets her "twin spirit" in the Australian Outback and discovers the real meaning in her life, and managed to persuade me that the Aboriginal "religion" or philosophy of life can, could and should be promulgated round the planet. It ties in humanity with the rest of the natural world. It makes the brutality of Western culture all too evident, but in a non-judgemental way. A brilliant book, that is enjoyable even if read as fiction, but really contains a message of vital importance to humanity, and especially Western society.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By PD Miller on 7 July 2009
Format: Paperback
I set out to review a book that I very much enjoyed, and had taken as "gospel" : but having just read Amazon reviewer T. Fawcett's comments, and Googled Marlo Morgan as suggested, I am feeling a bit confused.

I had taken 'Mutant' seriously because it seemed to me to have a ring of truth about it. Mason did write another - openly fictional - book about the Australian Aboriginals (was it called 'Message from Forever'?), and I didn't get past the second page, so badly was it written. 'Mutant' just flowed along, and I had assumed that this was because it was the truth, as opposed to pure invention. So yes - having just learnt that Morgan has apparently 'fessed-up, I am feeling disappointed and disillusioned ; yet I would recommend the book nonetheless.

I have long believed that in common with certain other groups who to this day remain relatively untouched and untainted by our somewhat grotesque Western ways, the Aboriginals have indeed retained knowledge and abilities that once were freely available to all : knowledge that most of humankind has gradually lost in the ugly rush towards 'civilisation' (which is, after all, a word that merely describes a society centred around cities - not always that high a recommendation, eh?).

So - pure fiction, or fiction based upon fact? Who knows? But why not read it anyway, for the little bit of magic that is missing from our lives, and which can lift our spirits beyond understanding. If you enjoyed watching (for example) 'Ghost', and 'Field of Dreams', then you know what I mean.
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