Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
Muswell Hillbillies
 
See larger image
 

Muswell Hillbillies

18 Oct 2010 | Format: MP3

5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 8.31 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:55
30
2
3:29
30
3
2:38
30
4
3:36
30
5
3:35
30
6
4:01
30
7
3:44
30
8
3:43
30
9
3:24
30
10
2:38
30
11
2:30
30
12
4:55
30
13
3:05
30
14
3:54


Product details

  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 2010 Kinks Properties Limited, under exclusive licence to Universal Music TV a division of Universal Music Operations Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 51:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0046BX9KM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,640 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By fizz buzz on 19 Jan 2005
Format: Audio CD
I decided to write this review as a means of helping other people discover this wonderful album the same way that I did.
I'd bought "Village Green" and was just browsing through the site and I noticed all these rave reviews for "Muswell", I thought at the price it was worth a chance and am I glad I took it.
A bitter-sweet look at life in England at the time this is a far more entertaining way to learn about our more recent history than any book.
The song writing is that good (read the booklet that comes with the album) you are transported back in time.
The opening "20th century man" offers an immediate insight of life and thoughts at the time of writing and the album carries on with poignant reminders of life "Holiday", "Skin & bone", "Complicated life", "Here come the people in grey", "Muswell Hillbilly" all dealt with the subtle humour of Ray Davies. The track "Have a cuppa tea" immediately made me think of my Grandma (bless her) with a smile and a tear at the same time. I don't think a Robbie Williams track will ever move me that way.
In short you've got all variety of music on here from blues to rock to folk and back again, I love it, my kids (6 & 4 years old)
love it (a joy to hear them singing "halleluja rosie lea) and you'll love it.
Hope you've found this review helpful, thanks to the other reviewers that's how I found this album.
It's a bargain price aswell.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Paul on 31 May 2003
Format: Audio CD
I cannot believe I stumbled on this one by accident. Had never heard of the album but liked the Kinks early stuff so thought I'd buy it. This is an album where every few tracks or so I just cant help shaking my head in acknowledgement of the amazing song-writing ability of Ray Davies. This is an album I'll never get bored of listening to. Interesting mix of musical styles - r and b, jazz and country - works incredibly well - not a duff track on there. I used to think Pete Townshend was the most talented Rock songwriter that Britain had produced but after listening to this album and the preservation albums I think that mantle now belongs to Ray.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By F. Perry on 13 Jun 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If most people accept the Beatles and the Stones as the two greatest British bands of the 1960's then who should be 3rd? Many fine contenders exist - The Who, The Small Faces, The Moody Blues to name but three but I feel that accolade firmly rests with the Kinks. As they entered the 1970's they were riding high on the back of the massive hit 'Lola' and had just switched label to RCA. Surely another decade of uninterrupted success lay ahead.

We now know that was not to be, the endless stream of killer singles was to dry up and Ray Davies would take the band in a different direction towards music hall. However before that all happened the band produced one of their finest albums. There is no big hit single here but the songs are perfectly crafted pop/rock confections with a country tinge and a small nod to future music hall adventures to come. The thing is the album works as a whole, their most cohesive work since 'Preservation Green' and perhaps as such is greater than the sum of it's individual songs.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By John K. Gateley on 2 Jun 2007
Format: Audio CD
Muswell Hillbillies proved to be a dramatic departure for one of the sixties most prolific and successful British pop groups. From Lola in 1970 we were suddenly dropped into 40 minutes of what seemed like a collection of gloomy and depressing songs. There were no hit singles on this album. RCA must have had a pink fit! However, if you treat this album as a serious collection of honest songs about the world we were all growing up in at the time; it stands up as a truly remarkable album. The lyrics are finely written. The tunes are catchy and well played. 20th Century Man (the opening track) is a powerful statement of not wanting to be part of this world. Ray still plays this track live today and it still sounds outstanding 36 years on. Oklahoma USA is one of the most beautiful songs you will ever here. Tracks like Alcohol, Skin and Bone and Complicated Life have an air of sarcasm and wit about them that is very appealing. There are a lot of Kinks fans out there - me included - who feel that this album was a real one-off departure for the Kinks which sounds as fresh and gritty today as it did in 1971. We thank Ray and the band for this classic album because the band never released anything as honest and open again. A true classic but don't look for any hit singles here - there aren't any - just a collection of great observations that are still very relevant in the 21st century.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Cordo on 31 Jan 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Muswell Hillbillies came out in 1971, right after the massive international hit Lola and the somewhat less of a hit Apeman, so probably anything would have paled in comparison. RCA signed The Kinks as a singles band, and this was the first concept album they issued for the label. "20th Century Man" was the single from the album and explored once again songwriter Ray Davies' disaffection from modern times ("I'm a twentieth century man, but I don't want to be here.") The songs are mainly about the People in Grey who know what's best for everyone who were moving people out of their quaint houses into council houses, giving them what they "need." ("Here Come the People in Grey.") I remember Ray in an interview at the time talking about his Aunt Rose who was arthritic being moved out of her lovely old house and into a council flat where the sinks were at a height that she could hardly raise her arms high enough to reach. The concert favorites "Alcohol," "Acute Schoziphrenia Paranoia Blues," and "Skin and Bones" were part of The Kinks' repretoire for several years. "Have a Cuppa Tea" ("Granny's always ravin' and rantin', and she's always puffin' and pantin', and she's always screamin' and shoutin,' and she's always brewing up tea.") is a lugubrious riot of music which sounds like everyone is having a great time. The alternate version included on the second CD is much less enjoyable and more subdued. "Oklahoma USA" is a rumination about a girl walking to her drab job dreaming about the movies, a theme which Ray would return to far more effectively in "Celluloid Heroes" the next year.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?