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Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition / Ravel: Valses nobles
 
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Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition / Ravel: Valses nobles

19 Feb. 2014 | Format: MP3

£8.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £11.87 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 3 Mar. 1997
  • Release Date: 19 Feb. 2014
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 1997 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:01:41
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001N27B92
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 551,054 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Scriabinmahler TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 6 Mar. 2008
Format: Audio CD
This is a very exciting and totally captivating perfromance of Pictures at an Exhibition played with provocative tempi and amazing grandeur. One of the finest Pogorelich DG recordings. Highly recommendable alongside Pletnev and Richter's classic accounts.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Charles Voogd on 7 Aug. 2008
Format: Audio CD
This recording is the slowest - in tempo - I know of Mussorgsky's Pictures. It stands opposite to the racy ways Byron Janis or Vladimir Ashkenazy perform(ed) this work.
Playing a classical work slow doesn't have to mean that it's dull or wrong. Most conductors tend to get slower with the years; the way Karajan performed Beethoven's symphonies in the sixties (recorded by EMI) is way faster than he did in the eighties (on DGG). But I think both versions have their merits. Fast(er) can mean more sensational - and gives the orchestral players the opportunity to show themselves of - and slow(er) can mean more insight. The BEST way to Judge a performer, or an orchestra is the way they play (together) in slower movements (andante and less) because the very thing you ought to hear that moment is insight and technique. Splashy performances are sensational for a summer or proms public and gives roaring applause but most of the time the insight in the works is lost and there're technical problems (which many don't hear because of the technical display and atmosphere of the moment and lack of knowing the work in a detailed manner).

But with Pogorelich I think you get a slow performance and a loss of insight. I think it's way too slow and than the coherence and the meaning of a work gets lost and that's what happening here. Listen to the way he takes the first promenade. This is not a visitor of an exhibition who thinks `well this's interesting, I'm very curious what pictures they've here, hope it's worth the money!' and of he goes to the first picture. No instead you get a person who thinks `can't be much they offer here, have seen everything before, must be a very good painter will he ever be able to surprise me'. Got the idea?
The way Pogorelich plays the old Castle is another example.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Ambient yet accessible. 13 Oct. 2000
By Andrew M. Schirmer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I'll go ahead and agree with Amazon that the Mussorgsky is a bit slow. "Ill Vecchio Castilo" and the catacomb movement in particular just drag on and on. However...
The Ravel is an absolute delight. Never has "Valses" been so "Sentimental." Every phrase is given the utmost care, and the true beauty of the music is brought out. While Porgelich's interpretation of these simple pieces sometimes borders on ambient, he somehow manages to drag the melody out of it...just when you think you're lost...
Anyone who would like to hear a fresh interpretation should pick this up.
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
This is a wonderful rendition of a favourite work 22 Nov. 1999
By D. Hendrickson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I should start by saying that I first heard of Pogorelich only four years ago when 3 pianists were staying with us as guests for the annual Verbier music festival. One evening, I asked "who is the best pianist in the world today?", expecting an interesting discussion with a variety of viewpoints. To my surprise, all three (age range 16 to 30) agreed on Pogorelich - especially since I had never heard his name. One of my guests had a CD of his, which I promptly played, and it was instant conversion! I now have every one of his recordings.
My two favourites are the "Pictures", and Chopin's 2nd piano concerto. I can see why some tradionalists complain that his style is ideosyncratic - it is! - but what he brings to the music is innovation and sheer beauty. It may sound heretical to say it, but I believe he is able to play the music the way it should have been composed, but wasn't. Improve on Chopin, or Mozart, or Mussorgsky? Impossible? But it's true, if 'conventional' renditions by other artists are indeed more faithful to the composer's own intentions. The proof is in the listening. Suspend your preconceptions, open your mind and your ears, and bask in the glory of his wonderful sound!
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
oh, come ON!!!! 15 Dec. 2002
By Matthew D. White - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is one heck of an album! Sure, IVO plays with the tempos alot, but his pianism is of a highly adventurous caliber, and his interpretations are never careless.
Also, the sound on this disc is more than adequate; actually one of the best recorded pianos I've heard on disc. I have no idea why the sound receives any negative marks here.
I don't think Ivo Pogorelich is interested in paying homage to anyone; not composer nor pianists past. But his approach does have the adventurous spirit of someone like Glenn Gould; if you can tolerate the guy, this makes for one exciting musical experience. Yes, it sounds like he is playing to please himself, rather than to placate an aesthetic or snooty audience. But I admire his chutzpah.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Intimate Pictures, overly refined Valses 1 April 2015
By Hank Drake - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Pogorelich plays the original version of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition (although he does move a few bass notes an octave lower for emphasis). The pianist’s performance is refined and intimate, none of the heaven storming of the kind provided in Sviatoslav Richter’s famed recording. Great music is open to varied interpretations, within limits, the individual pictures are beautifully characterized, and Pogorelich is convincing on his own terms. On the other hand, Pogorelich’s free way with metrics works against him in Ravel’s Valses nobles et sentimentales, since there should be at least a semblance of a waltz pulse throughout the piece – even when the tempo varies. But rubato is all over the place here, so even though the pianist’s playing is tonally gorgeous and there are some incredible pianissimos, the work overall fails to cohere.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Amazing Interpretation 22 Oct. 2011
By ladyl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Whether you are accustomed to hearing the orchestral or original piano version of "Pictures," this version will amaze you. Pogorelech brings something fresh to everything he flawlessly interprets - correct to the score but yet his own invention. Don't miss this experience. Close your eyes and as you listen and you can actually see those museum pictures. A masterful performance of unrivaled depth.
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