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Musica Nova - The Petrarca Madrigals
 
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Musica Nova - The Petrarca Madrigals

1 Oct. 2009 | Format: MP3

£14.98 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £48.62 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:49
30
2
5:34
30
3
4:23
4
n/a
30
5
4:58
30
6
5:04
30
7
4:27
30
8
3:47
30
9
5:04
30
10
4:59
30
11
4:47
30
12
4:38
Disc 2
30
1
4:44
30
2
5:18
30
3
5:09
30
4
5:32
30
5
5:09
30
6
4:35
30
7
5:01
30
8
5:08
30
9
5:04
30
10
5:11
30
11
4:31
30
12
5:03
30
13
3:47
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 Oct. 2009
  • Release Date: 1 Oct. 2009
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Label: Oehms Classics
  • Copyright: (C) 2009 Oehms Classics
  • Total Length: 2:01:37
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0044W1Y5A
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 376,076 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Hakemulder on 4 April 2011
Format: Audio CD
This is remarkable music: nothing happens! At least, nothing seems to happen until you start listening closely and discover that, though there is no drama, contrast, rhythmic excitement or 'madrigalism', there is a quiet fascination to these intricate works, due to the density of their polyphony and the subtle nuances of their means of expression. Willaert is one of the second generation of madrigalists, and clearly it was not necessary or possible to characterise his work as prima pratica because seconda pratica was still a long way off. Nevertheless, these settings of Petrarca's sonnets were a first in their time, as indicated by their Musica Nova title. Meant for a small circle of connoisseurs, they survived in one manuscript in the hands of a Florentine (lady) singer and eventually reached a larger public due to the efforts of Alfonso d'Este to get them published. This is their first and so far only recording, awakening a sleeping beauty as the excellent CD booklet expresses it. Singer Pur do full justice to this music, with carefully balanced, intimate and sonorous performances. Some may feel they could have done without the light vibrato now and then, but this is a minor quibble. More important may be the high price of these two CDs - definitely more than I remember paying! However, there is the option of an MP3 download or ordering from other sellers. Warmly recommended if you don't plan on playing this as 'background music'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Cooper on 2 Jan. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
These 2 CDs (Amazon B002N5KER4) of Willaert’s “Musica Nova”, settings of sonnets by Petrarch (+ a solitary one by Panfilo Sasso) have received plaudits from U.S. and U.K. listeners. There is no doubt about their enjoyment, though they do not succeed in communicating exactly what it is that they enjoy. Petrarch’s sonnets, written roughly between 1327 and 1374, elaborate on his passion for an unidentified woman, supposed by scholars to have been the wife of a French count attached (I assume) to the Avignon papacy. The sonnets have achieved multiple destinies. They express with eloquence and discretion Petrarch’s lifelong unrequitement; they endow this with philosophical insights; they contribute decisively to the evolution of the Italian language; they provided the material for settings by leading composers of the Italian renaissance; they created the techniques of allusion found in later poetic compilations, such as the Castilian and other Spanish “cancioneros”, devoted predominantly also to the theme of unreciprocated adoration.
There is only one known setting of a Petrarch sonnet from the poet’s lifetime (Amazon B003LUH5OU). The period of greatest musical interest in Petrarch’s canzionere is the 16th century, such, that questions of plagiarism in composition became prominent. To some degree Willaert’s own history, admirably recounted in the accompanying notes, repeats that of Petrarch: as Maestro di Capella at St. Mark’s, Venice, from 1527, he was celibate and there is no record of any offspring. This did not bar him from expressing his adoration of Polissena Pecorina, a Florentine courtesan who was a talented singer.
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