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Music In A Doll's House
 
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Music In A Doll's House

24 Sep 2012 | Format: MP3

6.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 11.04 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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2:48
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 24 Sep 2012
  • Label: Pucka Music
  • Copyright: 2003 Highnote Ltd
  • Total Length: 36:57
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00A1PDVA0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 41,952 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful By squashh on 27 Sep 2007
Format: Audio CD
Right from the galloping start of "The Chase" this album takes you on a lysergic maelstrom trip where the weather seeps in and blows through you ("Mellowing Grey", "Winter", "The Breeze"). Songs observe the strangeness of ordinary events (Never Like This, Hey Mr Policeman, See Through Windows) and lead you on a journey through love and time (Voyage, Peace of Mind, 3 X Time), the tracks swirling into one another with snatches of sounds already heard and sounds yet to come phasing in and out of the mix, imperceptibly taking you to a dark, still place and then returning you to earth thinking 'What the f*** was that?'. It also perfectly evokes the experience of winter days and nights in a mind altered state, accompanied by Roger Chapman as your weird uncle. Perhaps the most inventive album of all time and a must for all psychedelic meteorologists and for people who have been to their girlfriend's house for tea while out of their heads. It is so good that you'll only bear to play it twice a year and your friends will say 'it's a bit scary' then laugh nervously. Excellent.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Denis A. Browne on 4 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
Its strange which past groups & artists get remembered & respected, & who gets overlooked. Family were an absolutely awesome & successful band in their time, but you'll look in vain for any mention of them in taste-arbiters like Mojo or Q. Ok, its great that most of their cd's are still available & Roger Chapman just keeps on going, but they deserve more. This album is an absolute classic of English psychedelia - and other reviewers are right to point out its very English flavour. Roger Chapman's voice isn't for everyone, granted, but here he adapts well to the more melodic, spacier trax as well as his more strident sound on the likes of Hey Mr Policeman & Me My Friend. The group play up a storm & producer Dave Mason throws in the kitchen sink of Pepper-era special fx, without overdoing the phasing etc. Once you get past the sumptuous joys of the music, the lyrics are rather good, too. Its one of those albums that just seem to be a perfect whole, from the cover art to the way the trax join together, themes drifting in & out of view. I'd have no hesitation putting this alongside Piper at the Gates as a true psychedelic masterpiece.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Oct 2003
Format: Audio CD
It's 1968 and the British underground rock scene in the UK is making waves. Family, one of the many bands gaining widespread recognition and now 'above ground' getting recording deals, issue their debut 'Music in a Doll's House on the Reprise label.
It's a curious album; a mix of late 60's production, (with flanged and phased guitars of John Whitney) matched against the powerful and utterly unique vocals of Roger Chapman, the saxes of Jim King, Ric Grech's bass and Rob Townsend's drumming. Grech went on to join Clapton, Baker and Winwood in Blind Faith, whilst Chaman,bleating like a slaughtered lamb, underpinned the 'band sound' before moving on to form Streetwalkers with Whitney.His vocals are engaging throughout and yet, never reach the heights of the 'Weaver's Answer' on the next album, 'Family Entertainment'.
Whilst feeling somwhat dated at times, thia album defines much of the feel of the decade's twilight years. It's a great piece of British band/ musical history and for me, brings back memories of halcyon days of parties, trippy laid back summer evenings, John Peel's Top Gear, and the sheer originality that so many bands at this time offered.
I still have the old vinyl copy of this album. The CD is a 'must have', whether for fans of the period or fans of the band. Or for people like me, who just want to listen to a decent copy in their car!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By B. J. du Cille on 20 Sep 2011
Format: Audio CD
i bought this when it was first released and almost wore it out. I used to go and see Family play live and they were never less than fantastic. How they never made it really huge escapes me - I guess the critics never knew quite what they were - rock, pop, blues,jazz, psychedelic. Family were all those things. The succeeding albums never lived up to Doll's House for me. I was delighted when I was able to get it on CD and still play it 42 years on - it still makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up and gives me goosebumps. Dave Mason did a fair job producing this but it is the songs and performances that make it stand out, even now. Roger Chapman should be a national treasure - there was an incredible performer -if you stood too close to the stage you were in serious danger!!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Morten Vindberg on 16 May 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Family first album "Music In A Doll's House" is one of the albums, which must not be ignored. With Traffic guitarist Dave Mason as producer, the group recorded a very exciting album which is both innovative, melodic and bearing Mason's obvious Traffic imprint.

Group's original line-up included, besides the three regular Family members Roger Chapman, John Whitney and Rob King, also bassist and violinist Rick Grech and saxophonist Jim King. The line-up allowed a diverse instrumentation and the group took great advantage of this oportunity. Moreover, the songwriter-team Chapman / Whitney shines, with many fine compositions.

"Pscychedlia" is probably what you first think when you hear the opening track "The Chase"; the number has a fine melody and an instrumentation that can lead the mind towards both the Move and King Crimson.

The acoustic melodic approach is also found on the album, not least the beautiful "Mellowing Grey" and the airy "The Breeze" - both fine examples of this. "Never Like This" was written by Dave Mason and it clearly shows - sounds almost like a "Hole in My Shoe - 2". The grandiose of the opening number returns with "Me My Friend" - interesting change on lead vocals with Chapman taking care of the chorus while Jim King takes care of the verse. More pscychedelia on "Winter" - sounds almost like Creation.

The group's roots in R & B are revealed on "Hey Mr. Policeman" and "Old Songs, New Songs" - both tracks could have been Yardbirds numbers. The intro of "Peace of Mind" was later reused by David Bowie; the song is one of the major highlights of the album and a number that would become one of the group's live favorites.
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