Murder Must Advertise (Lord Peter Wimsey series Book 10) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a £6.05
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Murder Must Advertise (BBC Audio Crime) Audio CD – Audiobook, 3 Jul 2006


See all 68 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook
"Please retry"
£39.99 £29.99
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Trade In Promotion


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Audible.co.uk, an Amazon Company, is home to more than 100,000 audiobook downloads. Start a 30-day free trial today and get your first audiobook for FREE.




Trade In this Item for up to £6.05
Trade in Murder Must Advertise (BBC Audio Crime) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £6.05, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: BBC Audiobooks Ltd; New edition edition (3 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184607147X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846071478
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1 x 12.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 406,026 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Her books are English Literature at its best. Her plots are finely tuned and her Lord Peter Wimsey is delightful (The Times (letter))

She brought to the detective novel originality, intelligence, energy and wit (P.D. James)

I admire her novels ... she has a great fertility of invention, ingenuity, and a wonderful eye for detail (Ruth Rendell)

A truly great storyteller (Minette Walters)

Dorothy L Sayers is one of the best detective story writers (E.C. Bentley, DAILY TELEGRAPH) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The best of the golden age crime writers, praised by all the top modern writers in the field including P. D. James and Ruth Rendell, Dorothy L. Sayers created the immortal Lord Peter Wimsey. In his tenth appearance, he takes a job as an advertising copywriter to expose a ruthless killer. With an introduction by Elizabeth George.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
And by the," said Mr. Hankin, arresting Miss Rossiter as she rose to go,"there is a new copy-writer coming today." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Robert Kelly VINE VOICE on 31 July 2002
Format: Paperback
Lord Peter Wimsey is one of the greatest of all fictional detectives and 'Murder Must Advertise' presents us with one of his most intriguing mysteries. Set in the confines of 1930's advertising agency, Pyms Publicity. Lord Peter is called in to investigate the death of copywriter Victor Dean.
Not only is the story first rate, with all the expected twists and turns, but the atmosphere of the agency drawn from Sayer's own experience is vividly real. Sayers' was arguably the most complex of the pre war 'Queens of Crime' and this book certainly works on a number of levels. For those who are unfamiliar with either Sayers or Wimsey, this book makes an excellent introduction, and demonstrates why their popularity has persisted.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jess E. on 18 April 2001
Format: Paperback
One of my favourite Dorothy L Sayers novels (only to be topped by Five Red Herrings and The Nine Tailors), Murder Must Advertise is a clever mystery that takes you inside several layers of London society in the 1930s. It differs from Sayers' other novels in so far as our dectective, Lord Peter Wimsey, becomes part of the advertising agency he is investigating, instead of standing aloof from the situations, as he often does in his other novels. In fact, sole of the aspects I enjoy most about the novel are those related to Wimsey "playing" at being a copy writer. A fun read and a great twist at the end.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 17 Jun. 2006
Format: Paperback
When Lord Peter Death Breden Wimsey, privately investigating the "accidental" death of an employee of an advertising firm, takes a copywriting job there, he raises curiosity among the female employees. Known on the job only as "Breden," he is regarded as "a cross between Ray Flynn and Bertie Wooster, " complete with silk socks and expensive shoes, and obviously not from the same background as the rest of the staff. Assigned to advertise Dairyfield's Margarine and "domestic" tea, he occupies the dead man's office, churning out slogans while poking into relationships and possible motivations for murder. He soon discovers that the dead man, with limited resources, actively participated in the drug culture of upperclass parties, though how he became involved is an open question.

Lord Peter, as aristocratic as his title would imply, is adventurous and imaginative, a man of action and intelligence who does not hesitate to get down and dirty if necessary (though he'd prefer not "too" dirty). With a "tongue that runs on ballbearings," he can talk his way into and out of almost any situation, and as an ad agency employee, he provides the reader with some terrific one-liners and quips as he tries to sell products. Author Dorothy Sayers, who worked in an advertising agency herself for seven years, brings the agency to life with all its petty infighting and cynicism, creating a vibrant environment in which Wimsey's familiar wordplay and cleverness can be highlighted during his investigation of the murder--and the gruesome murders which follow in its wake.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aletheuon TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This wonderful book is the eighth Peter Wimsey novel, published in 1933. Most of the action takes place in an advertising agency. Wimsey is asked for help by Pym's Publicity, a very respectable firm. (It is based, apparently, on a firm called S. H. Bensons, where Dorothy Sayers worked for some years. ) Victor Dean, an employee, fell down some stairs and died, leaving a half-finished letter to Pym's management suggesting wrongdoing at the firm.
Wimsey pretends to be an advertising copywriter and investigates the office staff. He turns out to be extremely good at the job and even develops a very successful advertising campaign. Is there anything this man cannot do?
He discovers that Dean was socially involved with posh cocaine users. They are linked, through a Major Milligan, with a cocaine-selling ring which is under investigation by Parker, Wimsey's brother-in-law, who is a senior policeman.
Needing to infiltrate the posh group, Wimsey dresses up as a masked harlequin, and by his amazing stunts, he gets the attention of Dian de Momerie, the group's leader. Once again, he proves himself incredibly gifted, a born athlete and acrobat, an ideal man. So he investigates both the group and the firm and, after many twists and turns of the plot, he solves the murder.
Dorothy Sayers wrote that she was merely filling in time while writing this book because she did not yet have enough information to write `The Nine Tailors.' She didn't think it was an entirely convincing story, because she did not know the drugs world at all. She knew the advertising world, though, and she makes that come very much alive. She was good at creating character, too, and she knew the upper crust world very well. I think this is a very successful and entertaining novel.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Damaskcat HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 Dec. 2009
Format: Paperback
If this is the first of Dorothy L Sayers Lord Peter Wimsey novels you have read then you could be forgiven for being a little confused at the beginning. If you have read some of the other novels featuring the noble sleuth you will immediately identify Death Bredon as Peter Wimsey. He takes up employment at Pym's advertising agency at the request of the owner of the firm following the death of a member of staff - Victor Dean. Wimsey takes to the work like a duck to water and starts writing advertising copy for the princely sum of four pounds a week. As well as doing the job he starts ferreting around to try and find out whether Victor Dean's death was accident or murder.

The portrait of an advertising agency, from the messenger boys to the directors is excellent. Office politics and rivalries serve to muddy the waters of Wimsey's investigation. He gets involved with the bored and drug taking socialite Diane de Momerie, because the late Victor was a member of her sophisticated set, to try and find out what is going on amongst the glitterati. Masquerading as a masked harlequin and his own dissolute cousin, Wimsey ultimately puts himself in danger to unravel the mystery of Victor Dean's death and the connection of the fast set with Pym's Publicity.

There are some fascinating characters in the book from Ginger the messenger boy who wants to be a detective to the slightly pompous but good hearted Mr Pym himself. I loved the banter between the staff and clash of personalities which occurs in any office. While the mystery might be too complex to unravel before the intriguing denouement it is still a well written story. If you read it a second time you can see the clues are all there but most readers may well miss them. Perhaps it is not in the same class as 'Gaudy Night' or 'The Nine Tailors' but it is still worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback