Buy Used
£3.57
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean and free of writing and or highlighting. Cover edges show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Multicultural Politics: Racism, Ethnicity, and Muslims in Britain (Contradictions) Paperback – 21 Mar 2005


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 21 Mar 2005
£1.48
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.



Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Tariq Modood has been the leading British Muslim voice in debates around national identity, racism, ethnicity, multiculturalism and citizenship over the last decade, and his new volume, Multicultural Politics, showcases a felicitous blend of theoretical insight, policy-oriented practicality, and subversive common sense. One of the most respected thinkers on ethnic minority experiences in Britain. His book offers hope for British and pluralistic educators worldwide. Since the Salman Rushdie affair in 1989, Tariq Modood has established himself as one of the foremost commentators on minority ethnic affairs in Britain. Multicultural Politics is a very welcome and timely collection of selections from his work, 1990-2003. ... Multicultural Politics is an important book and unlike anything else currently available. -- Sean McLoughlin, University of Leeds Over the years Tariq Modood has emerged as one of the foremost theorists of British multiculturalism. His writings are marked by penetrating theoretical insights and good practical sense. These virtues are fully on display in this splendid book. -- Professor Lord Bhikhu Parekh Tariq Modood has been the leading British Muslim voice in debates around national identity, racism, ethnicity, multiculturalism and citizenship over the last decade, and his new volume, Multicultural Politics, showcases a felicitous blend of theoretical insight, policy-oriented practicality, and subversive common sense. One of the most respected thinkers on ethnic minority experiences in Britain. His book offers hope for British and pluralistic educators worldwide. Since the Salman Rushdie affair in 1989, Tariq Modood has established himself as one of the foremost commentators on minority ethnic affairs in Britain. Multicultural Politics is a very welcome and timely collection of selections from his work, 1990-2003. ... Multicultural Politics is an important book and unlike anything else currently available. Over the years Tariq Modood has emerged as one of the foremost theorists of British multiculturalism. His writings are marked by penetrating theoretical insights and good practical sense. These virtues are fully on display in this splendid book. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Tariq Modood is Professor of Sociology, Politics and Public Policy and the founding Director of the Centre for the Study of Ethnicity and Citizenship at the University of Bristol. He is a regular contributor to the media and policy debates and his latest books are Ethnicity, Nationalism and Minority Rights (co-edited with S. May and J. Squires) and Ethnicity, Social Mobility and Public Policy in the US and UK (co-edited with G. Loury and S. Teles) (both CUP, 2004). --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Broadening the Multicultural Discourse 27 May 2005
By Mohamed A. Nimer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Tariq Modood's Multicultural Politics: Racism, Ethnicity, and Muslims in Britain is a significant contribution in the study of contemporary Europe and its treatment of minorities. The book's focus on Muslims, who comprise the largest minority in both Britain and Europe, is an added plus. The book comes out in a time many Western analysts discuss the future of Western Muslims. Modood takes the discussion beyond Europe to include comparisons with the situation in the United States.

Modood broadens the discussion of multiculturalism to include a focus on secularism. He argues that "fundamentalist" secularist ideology that is anti-religion has had an adverse impact on the treatment of religious minorities. As a result, Muslims for example have faced stagnation in upward mobility. The current challenge to Britian's treatment of its Muslims is to assure that these new Britons are able to advance like their white Christian cohorts. The alternative, of course, is the emergence of a second-class citizenry group.

The irony of this bleak prospect is that is has been enhanced despite a growing participation of the new minorities, particularly Muslims, in British and other European public discourses. Modood argues that this Muslim assertiveness should lead to a rethinking of what pluralism means in today's European societies. The new thinking must include a fresh look at the secular state as it attempts to offer greater inclusion for religious minorities. Here Modood opens up a new line of inquiry that integrates sociology and political science. Multicultural Politics is a must reading for those who are serious about considering the status of minorities in the new Europe and the future of Islam in the West.
Food for Thought--but riddled with inconsistencies 1 Feb. 2006
By Caroline Nelson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Multicultural Politics is a VERY worthwhile read. Modood challenges traditional conceptions of identity and racism by exploring the experience of South Asian Muslims in Britain. He seeks to achieve an understanding of society that is "anchored in the comprehension of agents themselves." The most persistent voice is his own, which infuses his arguments with the passion of a child whose "privileged middle-class life" in Pakistan was disrupted by his family's immigration to Britain in 1961.

After analyzing ethnic statistics in Britain, Modood argues that the divide is not a black-white divide but "a divide between white, Chinese, African Asian, and Indian men on the one hand, and Bangladeshi, Pakistani, and Caribbean men on the other." Referencing the 20% of whites under 35 who admitted to being prejudiced against Asians in the 1986 Survey Report, Modood argues that this prejudice is primarily against Muslims and that "cultural racism" exists in tandem with and often as a second step to "color racism." While a quarter of whites attend a place of worship at least once a month, two-thirds of Muslims attend at least once a week. These statistics form the basis of Modood's claim that the movement to eliminate color racism excluded Asians by lumping them into the "black" category with which they could not identify.

"In locating oneself within a hostile society," Modood writes, "one must begin with one's mode of being, not one's mode of oppression." Modood cites evidence of Britain's "hostile society" in the BNP, adverse immigration laws, and "Paki-bashing" in the police force when Muslims confront the highest level of attacks on person and property. He also alleges discrimination against Muslims in education and employment. Muslims are underrepresented in prestigious jobs, and a BBC Radio experiment discovered that identical CVs submitted to 50 firms yielded interviews for 23% of applicants with white names compared to 9% with Muslim names. Modood also points to indirect discrimination that favors locals, requires work on Friday's, or frowns upon Muslim dress. However, he rejects Rex's theory that ethnicity is artificially determined by group conflict and Smith's theory that it is formed by resistance to oppression. Ethnicity is not, as Miles contends, a "false doctrine" and it is not "voluntary," as Banton suggests. Modood asserts that real collectivities exist, and defines them through five dimensions, including "cultural distinctiveness" and "identity."

He extends this analysis by arguing for a "state policy of multiculturalism" that views the country as more than a liberal association of autonomous individuals. He asserts the "positive right" of minorities to "share in the public domain, including law, in order to live by communal values even where those values run counter to majority values and lifestyles." While criticizing the effective "establishment" of Anglicanism in the British constitution, he argues that radical secularism also privileges the dominant ethnic group by forcing minorities to follow its normative legal ideal. Instead he proposes a "plural state," which recognizes both communities and individuals as actors and gives the former "a formal representation or administrative role" to play in the state, thereby offering a holistic emotional identity.

Modood's proposal fails to take Islam's pluralism into account. The very act of "institutionalizing some public space for religions" runs contrary to his fluid concept of identity. Modood asserts that he does not believe in "discrete, bounded populations of cultural absolutes" and expects a group to "change, develop, adopt, borrow, and synthesize". His proposal would marginalize minorities within Islam by creating a formal dialogue in the public sphere. Who will represent the Shi'a? Who will represent the 50% of Muslims who do not approve of state-funding for parochial schools or the youth who continue to identify with Islam without speaking South Asian languages, attending a mosque, or having arranged marriages?

A second cause for concern lies in Modood's definition of incitement to religious hatred. He compares the statement "Jesus Christ was a homosexual" with "Prophet Muhammad was a lewd, dishonest, dissembling power seeker" and concludes that the former is permissible but that the latter isn't because it criticizes a belief that is "part of the primary self-identification of a group." By forcing speech to contribute to "constructive dialogue," Modood places speech under subjective control. This act is a slippery slope to stifling academic inquiry. The ability of subversives within a religion to challenge the ascendant interpretation is essential to its fluid identity. Like his call for a "plural state," restricting offensive speech hardens the boundaries of identity that Modood ostensibly prefers remain "soft."
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback