Mukiwa: A White Boy in Africa and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £9.99
  • You Save: £2.00 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Mukiwa: A White Boy in Af... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mukiwa: A White Boy in Africa Paperback – 5 Jan 2007


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£2.81 £0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Mukiwa: A White Boy in Africa + When A Crocodile Eats the Sun + The Fear: The Last Days of Robert Mugabe
Price For All Three: £22.47

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; New Ed edition (5 Jan. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330450107
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330450102
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 63,945 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Godwin is the award winning author of The Fear, When a Crocodile Eats the Sun, and Mukiwa, all published by Picador. He writes for various publications including the New York Times magazine, National Geographic and Vanity Fair. He lives in Manhattan.

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Growing up in Rhodesia in the 1960s, Peter Godwin inhabited a magical and frightening world of leopard-hunting, lepers, witch doctors, snakes and forest fires. As an adolescent, a conscripted boy-soldier caught in the middle of a vicious civil war, and then as an adult who returned to Zimbabwe as a journalist to cover the bloody transition to majority black rule, he discovered a land stalked by death and danger.

‘The life of the white boys and girls in colonial Africa has vanished now, but this fine and powerful memoir is a marvellous contribution to its literature’

William Boyd, Sunday Times

‘His memoir of those terrible years is a vivdly scary adventure story, as well as a poignant portrait of a bitter moral dilemma…superb’

Graham Lord, Daily Telegraph

‘I have no hesitation in saying that Mr Godwin’s book is a classic’

Anthony Daniels, Sunday Telegraph

‘Remarkable’

Doris Lessing, Observer

About the Author

Peter Godwin is an award-winning author and journalist. Born and raised in Zimbabwe, after military service he studied law at Cambridge University and international relations and African history at Oxford. He was a foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times and a founding presenter and writer of Assignment/Correspondent, BBC television’s premier foreign affairs programme. Mukiwa was an international bestseller and winner of the George Orwell Prize for political writing and the Esquire-Apple-Waterstone’s Non-Fiction Award. When a Crocodile Eats the Sun, about his return to Zimbabwe as it began to collapse into chaos, is also published by Picador. He lives in New York.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Philip Spires on 23 Sept. 2007
Format: Paperback
Peter Godwin certainly has a story to tell. It's a story of an idyllic, if unusual childhood, a disrupted but eventually immensely successful education, military service and then two careers, one in law, planned but aborted, and then one in journalism, discovered almost by default. Listed like this these elements might sound just a bit mundane, perhaps not the subject of memoir. When one adds, however, the location, Rhodesia becoming Zimbabwe, the result is a deeply moving, in places deeply sad, as well as quite disturbing account of a life lived thus far. Mukiwa, by the way, is Shona for white man.

The setting for Peter Godwin's early years was a middle class, professional and, crucially, liberal family living in eastern Rhodesia, close to the Mozambique border. I had relatives in that same area, near Umtali and Melsetter, and they used to do exactly what the Godwins did regularly which was to visit the Indian Ocean beaches near Beira. We used to get postcards from there every year, usually in the middle of our north of England winter. Envy wasn't the word...

Peter Godwin's mother was a doctor and this meant that his childhood was unusual in two respects. Not many youngsters in white households had liberal-minded parents and even fewer helped their mothers conduct post mortems. Unlike most mukiwa, Peter Godwin had black friends. He learned the local language and got to know the bush. He also grew up close to death and then lived alongside it during the years of the war of independence. He describes how the war simply took over everything and labels himself as a technician in its machinations. It's a telling phrase, admitting that he did not himself want to fight anyone.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gary Bembridge on 15 July 2010
Format: Paperback
Having grown up in Zimbabwe at the same time as Peter writes about, I found this book entertaining, funny, depressing, sad, traumatic and disturbing all at the same time. He is a fabulous writer and all his books I have read so far are very compelling and beautifully written. I highly recommend this book and also his Crocodile Eats The Sun if you want to understand better the confusion and emotion that the White population of Zimbabwe went through. Of course there is a deep tragedy he describes from the Black Zimbabwe population, but his story and books are about how the white man struggled to both feel and be part of the country while also finding he was no longer welcome. I eagerly await his new book due out later this year
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By T. Williams on 16 Mar. 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a triumph. Godwin's account of the beginnings of Rhodesia's move towards independence and its fruition in 1980 is a beautifully crafted, honest and at times terrifying read. I have never in my life finished a book and immediately turned back to page 1 and started all over again (although I did force myself to stop at page 18 when I realised what I was doing). Peter Godwin invites us to share the love he has for his family, friends and a country struggling to free itself from its colonial past. From childhood to adulthood Mukiwa charts the drastic changes of a country and its effect on the Godwin's. The companion piece, When A Crocodile Eats the Sun is even more profound. A work that lets us know more of the tragic situation in Zim. I wept.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Taz on 22 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
I am new to biography and knew very little about this part of Africa

I remember new pupils coming to my primary school but I didn't see the significance apart from it was weird there were middle class white kids turning up from Africa. OUr teacher told us to be nice to them.

I was enthralled by this book. I found it insightful and sensitive. Be warned though - he doesn't pull his punches and if you are looking to be offended by something you could dig it out of here.

This is a man who loves his country and wants us to understand it in all its beauty and horror.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Frances on 31 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
For me it was a trip down memory lane going to places from my childhood. But having spoken to many other people who are not from Africa and have read it , it is an interesting and imparitally told story, well written, and uplifting. I laughed and cried through the book - great great story telling
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Sept. 2000
Format: Hardcover
A fantastic book for everybody. It gave me an interresting insight into the colourful politics of the rhodesian war. Peter Godwin's experiences will change your views and open your mind. This charming story of his change from boy to man also dipicts a beutiful country that has since been shadowed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By garyh1967 on 3 Dec. 2013
Format: Hardcover
Back in the '90s after Nick Hornby wrote 'Fever Pitch' a lot of would be football writers jumped on the bandwagon with much readable results. The same has been true of the white experience of growing up in Africa. None, so far (with the exception of Peter Godwin's other writing) has come close to 'Mukiwa'.

He has the ability to put the reader right into the middle of his story whether it be growing up in the Eastern Highlands of Rhodesia, fighting the war in Matabeleland or returning to Zimbabwe.

I have owned this book for 16 years now and probably read it cover to cover three or four times. On many, many more occasions I have idly picked it up off my bookshelf, opened it and randomly read a few pages. An absolute delight!

I could not recommend this book more highly
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback