Buy Used
£2.80
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mugabe and the White African Paperback – 17 Jun 2011

4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£3.19 £0.01

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Lion Books (17 Jun. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745955460
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745955469
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 419,398 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Potent mix of suspense, pathos, and indignation. --Variety on the documentary

About the Author

Ben Freeth MBE is a British-born Zimbabwean farmer who successfully sued Mugabe in an international court in 2008. Since winning the suit he has been harassed and his farm burnt to the ground. His family's story was made into the most-viewed documentary of the past year, which has won several international awards.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I congratulate Ben Freeth on writing such a readable account of the experiences of his family in fighting for the rights of white farmers, black farmers and black farm workers to continue living on their land in Zimbabwe.
It is true that he concentrates on the minority of white farmers who bravely remain despite the threats on their lives and the theft of their property but he is also fighting for the rights of the vast number of black people who are being denied quality of life by President Mugabe's regime.
I was afraid that I would find the book boring and full of mind numbing detail of court proceedings etc but I was wrong and I have found reading Mugabe and the White African thoroughly fascinating and informative. The account of Ben's face to face encounter with Peter Chimada in the documentary film leaves questions unanswered but Ben has included the conversation in full which I found most helpful.
The book is written from the perspective of someone whose belief in God is totally foundational to his life and his thought processes so someone of different beliefs may find this irritating but they may also find it enlightening.
It is a book well worth reading.
2 Comments 10 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I was given this book and initially feared that it may be rather heavy, boring and/or traumatic. Instead I found it, as the BBC reviewer says "utterly compelling". I already had a reasonably strong awareness of the extent of human rights abuses in Zimbabwe. What this book achieves is to paint the inside story of some of those abuses and to give an understanding of what takes for individuals to stand up and fight back. Some previous reviewers have commented negatively on the extent to which Ben Freeth writes about his faith. But whether or not the reader is a Christian, it is clearly Ben and his family's faith that has given them the courage to fight a landmark court case. The book does not preach to the reader, it just shows how their faith enabled them to help raise international awareness of the abuse of law in Zimbabwe.

I have heard good people say that if whites had redistributed land in Zimbabwe before 1990 then the government's compulsory Land Acquisition Act would never had been brought in. Without trying to be an indepth historical analysis, this book helps to show how much more complex the situation really was. Although a personal story about white farmers and their workers, this book shows that farmers have really only been the cover for Mugabe's efforts to control all his people - hence the author's references to the 'Operation Gukuruhundi' massacre of 20,000 people in 1983-4 and the 2005 'Operation Murambatsvina', a campaign to forcibly clear "illegal" trading and housing across the country which affected some 2.4 million people, according to the UN. This book is not an analysis of the whole situation in Zimbabwe, it is a personal story. But it is a heroic one which is extremely well told.

I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting a better understanding of the situation in Zimbabwe.
1 Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is one of the most remarkable and well written books I have read in years and I could barely put it down. Ben tells the extraordinary story of one family's courageous battle against injustice and a ruthless Dictator. For those who have seen the documentary of the same name he gives far more context and detail in the book and the descriptions of the terror that so many have lived through is emotionally shattering. I cannot think of a better example of a family living out their faith in our difficult world. This book is a must-read for any Christian but also for anyone who cares about justice.
Comment 15 of 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a very interesting book for those who have an interest in southern Africa. Ben Freeth is a remarkable person who appears to have very strong principles and Christian beliefs. I some times felt he may have achieved more if he had been a bit more compromising. It describes how Mugabe is prepared to destroy this beautiful and fertile country for his hatred of white people. I believe that most black Zimbabweans have suffered more than the whites Mugabe is targeting.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is a big slap in the face reminding one how long the political violence in Zimbabwe has been going on and is now just taken for granted; and how everyone, black and white, worker and owner, is the loser when a political ideology of redistribution results in repression and violence and literally kills the personal freedom and individual responsibility that is required to create not just "wealth" but things as basic as food!
1 Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Mugabe and the White African

Mugabe and the White African by Ben Freeth is a wonderful book, which describes his and his family's fight against the tyranny of Robert Mugabe - a fight simply to keep the farm that they and Freeth's father-in-law own in Zimbabwe. Courage of heroic proportions is set against evil and is shown to be powerless against such an adversary as Mugabe and his thugs. While not explicitly a Christian book, Freeth is supported, even at the point where death seems inevitable, by his faith in God; and the book is worth buying if only for the forewords by Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa and Archbishop John Sentamu of York. While the ending of the book is immensely sad, the reader is left with a sense that it just might mark a new beginning for the people of Zimbabwe, both black and white.
1 Comment 13 of 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback