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Mrs McGinty's Dead: Complete & Unabridged Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged


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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Unabridged edition edition (16 Jun. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 000716145X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007161454
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.5 x 13.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 236,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Torquay in 1890, Agatha Christie began writing during the First World War and wrote over 100 novels, plays and short story collections. She was still writing to great acclaim until her death, and her books have now sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in over 100 foreign languages. Yet Agatha Christie was always a very private person, and though Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple became household names, the Queen of Crime was a complete enigma to all but her closest friends.

Product Description

Review

‘So simple, so economical, so completely baffling. Every clue scrupulously given, with superb sleight of hand.’ Sunday Times

‘The plot is perfect and the characters are wonderful.’ San Francisco Chronicle

‘The best Poirot since such pre-war classics as Cards on the Table.’ New York Times

From the Back Cover

'Mrs McGinty's Dead'

Mrs McGinty died from a brutal blow to the back of her head. Suspicion fell immediately on her shifty lodger, James Bentley, whose clothes revealed traces of the victim's blood and hair. Yet something was amiss: Bentley just didn't look like a murderer.

Poirot believed he could save the man from the gallows – what he didn't realise was that his own life was now in great danger…

"So simple, so economical, so completely baffling. Every clue scrupulously given, with superb slight of hand."
SUNDAY TIMES

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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HERCULE Poirot came out of the Vielle Grand'mere restaurant into Soho. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By L O'connor on 5 Feb. 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Hercule Poirot is feeling bored, so he is delighted when he is visited by his old friend Superintendent Spence of the Kilchester Police. Spence has recently been in charge of murder case, an old charwoman, Mrs McGinty, has been brutally bludgeoned to death. Her lodger, James Bentley, has been convicted of her murder and is due to hang. But Spence is convinced Bentley didn't do it, and he wants Poirot to find out who did.
So Poirot goes to stay in the village of Broadhinny, where the grizzly deed was done, and he soon begins to uncover reasons why other people might have wanted Mrs McGinty dead. While striving to discover the real murderer, he also has to cope with the appalling conditions at the truly terrible 'guest house' he is staying at. The Summerhayes, whose house it is, have no idea how to run a guest house, nor even how to prepare an edible meal.
The scenes where Poirot's sufferings at the Summerhayes's horrible guest house are described are among the funniest in the book, which is replete with humour. There are many interesting characters, especially the scatty but charming Maureen Summerhayes, whom Poirot likes in spite of her atrocious cooking. The character of the convicted murderer Jame Bentley is particularly good, he is utterly unprepossesing, which makes Poirot all the more determined to prove him innocent.
The best exchange in this very entertaining book comes near the end:' "Bon Dieu, how stupid I have been" said Hercule Poirot. "The whole thing is simple, is it not?" It was after that remark that there was very nearly another murder - the murder of Hercule Poirot by Superintendent Spence'. Enjoy it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Genevieve on 29 Sept. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Hugh Fraser is a master at the art of narrating the audio book. I have never heard anybody as good as he is, and he is very good in this particular one, perhaps because 'Mrs. McGinty's Dead' contains quite a bit of comedy, and he excels at this. The voice he gives to Mrs. Ariadne Oliver, Agatha Christie's alter ego, is quite convincing, but he has a huge variety of different voices upon which to draw for various characters, including Poirot himself. If you are after an audio book do give Mr. Fraser a try - you won't regret it. He is excellent company and I guarantee that you will be back for more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jim J-R on 6 Jun. 2013
Format: Paperback
It's been quite a while since I last read an Agatha Christie novel and I'm pleased by what I got on my return to the world of Hercule Poirot and Ariadne Oliver. When the police arrest a man they believe to be innocent, yet to whom all the evidence points, they call on an elderly Poirot to find the truth.

It's a classically complex tale of a rich tapestry of suspects and clues which could point various directions, and which had me fairly baffled almost throughout. At one point I did suspect the truth but only fleetingly amongst a number of other possibilities that I was bombarded with.

This is one of the examples of a novel that Christie has filled with humour, often making herself the butt of the joke, and the amusement it gave nicely balances parts that could come across as brutal (although perhaps not compared to crime novels of the modern day). The comedy absolutely makes the book, and I really loved this aspect, which is often forgotten, of her writing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By W. O'NEILL on 6 Jun. 2001
Format: Paperback
An innocent man accused of murder and it is up to Poirot to save him in this well-written story. The wool is pulled well over the reader's eyes and the end is a revelation. I got completely the wrong suspect. A good read, even if it does feature the infuriating Ariadne Oliver.
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Format: Paperback
Like its magnificent predecessor "Taken at the Flood", this book paints a vivid picture of how hard life was in Britain after the end of WW II. But now we are at the beginning of the '50s; thanks to American financial aid the economy is on the turn, rationing is coming to an end, and things are starting to look up a bit. But that's where the similarities with "Taken at the Flood" end. This novel is much less well-written; with little attempt at character development, some behaviour by Poirot that is utterly unbelievable (I can't say what it is without ruining the puzzle), and far too much flagging of the solution.

Having said all that, this is a perfectly acceptable read, with a not too taxing puzzle, and one or two very interesting characters. There are also some amusing references to Christie herself, under the guise of Ariadne Oliver and her fictional Finnish detective - who is almost exactly the opposite of Poirot in every respect other than that he is despised by his author! Ms Oliver first appeared in "Cards on the Table" (1936) and was introduced much more frequently after her success in "Mrs McGinty's Dead". She makes a much more believable foil for Poirot than the increasingly wooden and, let's face it, depressingly thick, Hastings.
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By John M VINE VOICE on 15 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When Mrs McGinty, the charwoman/housekeeper in a small village, is found dead the obvious suspect is her lodger James Bentley who is convicted and sentenced to hang. However Superintendent Spence is not convinced of his guilt and calls in Poirot to re-investigate; wise move!
Hercule Poirot duly visits the local residents and uncovers cupboards full of secrets in his search for the truth. It seems Mrs McGinty's snooping uncovered a dark and deadly secret, which proved fatal for her.
There's plenty of clues and mis-direction along the way as Poirot uncovers the truth in his usual inimitable style. The character of Ariadne Oliver also appears once more, an intriguing self-portrait of Agatha Christie herself. Unlike some, I found her humorous rather than grating. Poirot is such a great character, and here he is laid bare with his sharp and incisive mind and his vanity on display in equal measure.
A good story told in the no-nonsense Agatha Christie style.
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