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Mr. Bevan's Dream: Why Britain Needs Its Welfare State (Chatto counterblasts) [Paperback]

Sue Townsend
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

23 Nov 1989 Chatto counterblasts
Lamenting the decline in all crucial welfare services during ten years of Thatcher rule, the author warns that this dream may fast becoming a Conservative nightmare. The book is supplemented by statistics that indicate the damage done by the last decade of the Thatcher government. Townsend's anecdotes are a highly personal testimony to the Welfare State and the principles which underlie the concept of "welfare". The author has had a number of plays staged including "Bazaar and Rummage", "The Great Celestial Cow". She also wrote "The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 and Three Quarters" and its follow-up "The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole" as well as "Rebuilding Coventry".


Product details

  • Paperback: 74 pages
  • Publisher: Chatto & Windus; First Edition edition (23 Nov 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0701134682
  • ISBN-13: 978-0701134686
  • Product Dimensions: 20.2 x 13.2 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 550,593 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Leicester in 1946, Sue left school at 15 years of age. She married at 18, and by 23 was a single parent with three children. She worked in a variety of jobs including factory worker, shop assistant, and as a youth worker on adventure playgrounds. She wrote in secret for twenty years, eventually joining a writers' group at the Phoenix Theatre, Leicester in her thirties.

At the age of 35, she won the Thames Television Playwright Award for her first play, Womberang, and started her writing career. Other plays followed including The Great Celestial Cow (1984), Ten Tiny Fingers, Nine Tiny Toes (1990), and most recently You, me and Wii (2010), but she became most famous for her series of books about Adrian Mole, which she originally began writing in 1975.

The first of these, The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 ¾ was published in 1982 and was followed by The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1984). These two books made her the best-selling novelist of the 1980s. They have been followed by several more in the same series including Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years (1993); Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction (2004); and most recently Adrian Mole: The Prostrate Years (2009). The books have been adapted for radio, television and theatre; the first being broadcast on radio in 1982. Townsend also wrote the screenplays for television adaptations of the first and second books and Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years (published 1998, BBC television adaptation 2001).

Several of her books have been adapted for the stage, including The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 ¾: The Play (1985) and The Queen and I: a Play with Songs (1994), which was performed by the Out of Joint Touring Company at the Vaudeville Theatre and toured Australia. The latter is based on another of her books, in which the Royal Family become deposed and take up residence on a council estate in Leicester. Other books include Rebuilding Coventry (1988), Ghost Children (1997) and Queen Camilla (2006).

She was an honorary MA of Leicester University, and in 2008 she was made a Distinguished Honorary Fellow, the highest award the University can give. She was an Honorary Doctor of Letters at Loughborough University, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Her other awards include the James Joyce Award of the Literary and Historical Society of University College Dublin, and the Frink Award at the Women of the Year Awards. In 2009 she was given the Honorary Freedom of Leicester.

Her most recent novel, The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year, was published in 2012 by Michael Joseph and was a giant success, selling over half a million copies to date in the UK alone.


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5.0 out of 5 stars Socialism at its best 17 Jun 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A wonderful pamphlet in a great series by well known figures in the public eye, but with their own slant on a subject not in their normal genre. The late Sue Townsend writes movingly about her growing up in a working class environment in one of britains industrial cities, and passionately about the social changes that were just coming to fruition to benefit the whole of the populace in a fair & equitable fashion by enlightened politicians of the time.
Such a shame that modern politicos have only their own (& fellow old school chums') interests in mind as they methodically break down all that was great about the UK
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