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Mozart: Symphonies 29 & 33 Import


Price: £11.45
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6 new from £11.41 6 used from £3.59

Product details

  • Orchestra: English Baroque Soloists
  • Conductor: John Eliot Gardiner
  • Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Audio CD (25 Oct 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Philips
  • ASIN: B00000E2U4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 414,002 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By I. Giles TOP 50 REVIEWER on 17 July 2013
Format: Audio CD
This well recorded disc from 1984 was one of the series of Mozart symphonies that took Gardiner out of the Baroque period and into the Classical realms. His orchestra was far more expert than many and could be relied upon for the wind and brass to play to play accurately in tune and for the strings to have none of the acerbic qualities often associated with other period bands at that time.

There have been numerous period performances since these, plus hybrid performances where modern chamber orchestras include natural brass without valves plus timpani with hard sticks. This is a method of bridging the period gap favoured by a growing number of conductors and spearheaded by Harnoncourt and Mackerras amongst others. The idea here is to address the problems of balance by using smaller bored older brass that can deliver cutting edge when played loudly as the music requires but without the overwhelming volume of the modern instruments.

In the case of this disc by Gardiner, the full period orchestra is used but in a way that will not be a problem to more traditional listeners. Tempi are well within normal traditional limits, string tone is good as is the tuning of the woodwind and brass. Textures and internal balances are correct and, most importantly, one is able to follow the musical dialogues between instruments so much more easily. These are often obscured or inaudible in larger modern orchestras.

Gardiner is flexible in so far as he is moulding phrases and delivering an interpretation rather than merely beating time as some early practitioners seemed to be doing. Indeed, at the time of this disc being originally issued it was sometimes criticised for not being 'period' enough and for imposing later styles of conducting onto and earlier style of music.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 21 Jun 2013
Format: Audio CD
BO'H: Well Sir John, it was your 70th birthday earlier in the year. You know what the Bible says about three score and ten! Happy birthday Jeggy! The present is in the mail! And it's about time we buried the hatchet. And speaking of weapons, recently I took a bullet for the team - right in the gizzards! More on that later!

JEG: Bernard, somewhat breezily, I have read your reviews on Amazon. They are a disgrace - do you hear me - a disgrace to civilisation! And how commonplace they are! What on earth is going on in the colonies? Have the educational standards - never high to begin with - fallen so low? Who can understand all this . . . this . . . balderdash?

BO'H: I'm sorry Jeggy - fair dinkum! The devil made me write `em. And who am I to criticise someone of your stature? Anyway, let's move on. Now I've got some questions for you. Some of them are buggers.

JEG: Oh, whatever! Just hurry up! And stop calling me that dreadful name! It's Sir John, please!

BO'H: Now Jeggy - sorry, Sir John - some people - not me, I hasten to add - wonder why the producers of the Art of Conducting ever asked you to sit in judgement on the likes of Furtwangler, Karajan and Bernstein. Such people - not me - regard you at best as a Baroque specialist whose ventures outside this domain have been fitfully successful - and mate, I have to say this: semi-listenable. Accusations of `brisk efficiency' are not thin on the ground. Others mock you for your innate reticence. You would appear to be uneasy with the numinous. What are your thoughts?

JEG: Who cares what the critics think! As Berlioz said immortally: Pauvres diables!... D'où sortent ces malheureux êtres ?... À quel Montfaucon vont-ils mourir ?...
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
If you love Mozart, don't pass this wonderful recording by! 24 Feb 2010
By J. B. Sanford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am an avid listener to classical music, particularly Bach and Mozart. This is a very special recording. I probably have 10, or more, recordings of these symphonies. This recording is what I always come back to. I don't tire of it. It's beautifully done, and is my definite favorite.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Exceptional Mozart Symphonies 29 & 33 20 Jan 2012
By J. Bynum - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

- Symphony No. 29 in A
- Symphony No. 33 in B flat

John Eliot Gardiner
English Baroque Soloists (on period instruments)

(Philips - DDD - 1984)

Gardiner gives us two exceptionally delightful performances.
This is a Five Star CD
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Period performances with moderation and strength of purpose 17 July 2013
By I. Giles - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This well recorded disc from 1984 was one of the series of Mozart symphonies that took Gardiner out of the Baroque period and into the Classical realms. His orchestra was far more expert than many and could be relied upon for the wind and brass to play to play accurately in tune and for the strings to have none of the acerbic qualities often associated with other period bands at that time.

There have been numerous period performances since these, plus hybrid performances where modern chamber orchestras include natural brass without valves plus timpani with hard sticks. This is a method of bridging the period gap favoured by a growing number of conductors and spearheaded by Harnoncourt and Mackerras amongst others. The idea here is to address the problems of balance by using smaller bored older brass that can deliver cutting edge when played loudly as the music requires but without the overwhelming volume of the modern instruments.

In the case of this disc by Gardiner, the full period orchestra is used but in a way that will not be a problem to more traditional listeners. Tempi are well within normal traditional limits, string tone is good as is the tuning of the woodwind and brass. Textures and internal balances are correct and, most importantly, one is able to follow the musical dialogues between instruments so much more easily. These are often obscured or inaudible in larger modern orchestras.

Gardiner is flexible in so far as he is moulding phrases and delivering an interpretation rather than merely beating time as some early practitioners seemed to be doing. Indeed, at the time of this disc being originally issued it was sometimes criticised for not being 'period' enough and for imposing later styles of conducting onto and earlier style of music. Since then there have been modifications in performing Mozart's music on period instruments and now this disc seems to be fairly mainstream. it certainly does not attempt the very successful approach to period Mozart as found in Pinnock's complete boxed survey of all the symphonies.

Looking back at this disc, it would be fair to say that what once was ground breaking would now be classed as mainstream. The disc has continued to give pleasure within my collection since 1986 since when other discs have been deleted. Gardiner has always been reliable as a musician and what you get here are musical performances.

I would suggest that this is worth investigating, especially at second-hand prices. New prices seem expensive when considering other new options. If this were to be re-issued as a set with its companions it would be a very tempting purchase option.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Fireside Chat with Jeggy 21 Jun 2013
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
BO'H: Well Sir John, it was your 70th birthday earlier in the year. You know what the Bible says about three score and ten! Happy birthday Jeggy! The present is in the mail! And it's about time we buried the hatchet. And speaking of weapons, recently I took a bullet for the team - right in the gizzards! More on that later!

JEG: Bernard, somewhat breezily, I have read your reviews on Amazon. They are a disgrace - do you hear me - a disgrace to civilisation! And how commonplace they are! What on earth is going on in the colonies? Have the educational standards - never high to begin with - fallen so low? Who can understand all this . . . this . . . balderdash?

BO'H: I'm sorry Jeggy - fair dinkum! The devil made me write `em. And who am I to criticise someone of your stature? Anyway, let's move on. Now I've got some questions for you. Some of them are buggers.

JEG: Oh, whatever! Just hurry up! And stop calling me that dreadful name! It's Sir John, please!

BO'H: Now Jeggy - sorry, Sir John - some people - not me, I hasten to add - wonder why the producers of the Art of Conducting ever asked you to sit in judgement on the likes of Furtwangler, Karajan and Bernstein. Such people - not me - regard you at best as a Baroque specialist whose ventures outside this domain have been fitfully successful - and mate, I have to say this: semi-listenable. Accusations of `brisk efficiency' are not thin on the ground. Others mock you for your innate reticence. You would appear to be uneasy with the numinous. What are your thoughts?

JEG: Who cares what the critics think! As Berlioz said immortally: Pauvres diables!... D'où sortent ces malheureux êtres ?... À quel Montfaucon vont-ils mourir ?... Que leur octroie la munificence municipale pour nettoyer (ou salir) ainsi le pavé de Paris ?... À quel âge les envoie-t-on à l'équarrissage ?... Que fait-on de leurs os ? (leur peau n'est bonne à rien.) [Poor devils! Where do these unfortunate creatures come from? On what butcher's block will they meet their end? What reward does municipal munificence allot them for thus cleaning the pavements of Paris? At what age are they sent to the glue factory? What becomes of their bones (their skin being good for nothing)?]

BO'H: I could not agree more. Even in Baroque however, some question the soundness of your methods. You would be aware of a certain controversial and flamboyant High Priest of Period Practice on Amazon . . . ,

JEG: Ahhh, the man with the recorder . . .

BO'H: Yes indeed - the man with the recorder! Read up on his comments in your own time. More widely, I'll wager London to a brick that Hasse will remain in obscurity and Hell will turn Methodist before his operas receive equal billing with Figaro and Don Giovanni!

JEG: You won't get any argument from me. I don't understand the man and his ex cathedra comments.

BO'H; Now Jeggy, look at this: it's a copy of your performances of K 201 & K 319, recorded in December 1984. I bought it recently. I found it in a second-hand shop. It's not in good shape. I reckon it has done the rounds like the proverbial trollop. I like the photograph on the cover. It brings Biggles to mind . . . `Caruthers, start up the Sopwith Camel! It's time to strafe the Hun!' Recording-wise, they could have been a lot worse: the digital glare is less of a worry than the resonance of the hall in which they were recorded. Now Jeggy, here is an observation - and I will say it as nicely as I can: their lack of musicality aside, what makes you think these performances have got anything to do with Mozart?

JEG: Oh, what an outrageous thing to say, you Australian ruffian!

BO'H: Mate, I am being fair dinkum! Look, I don't want to focus too much on the technical shortcomings of the English Baroque Soloists (OK, six seconds into K 201, that blooper from the strings is a shocker - let's not worry about the misadventures of the horns in the Minuet of the same symphony: that could happen to any orchestra). My real question is this: why does `authentic Mozart' have to sound so ugly, scrawny and lacking in grace? Here, I am referring to the vinegary tone of the strings, the clipped phrasing and the whiny woodwind. Does this approach really wash away the varnish of Romanticism to reveal the composer as he is? I don't think so. This disc is more an exercise in blood-letting than music-making - and to no vivid end.

JEG: Scholarship says it, I believe it, that settles it. Really, if you cannot steel yourself to hear the music as Mozart heard it - warts and all - listen to Mr Almost Evil in Berlin with his Gotterdammerung-sized orchestra in Mozart. That might be more to your taste, such as it is!

BO'H: Don't be like that Jeggy! I am merely waiting for my `burn the bra' moment - you know, where I throw away Klemperer in K 319 and Sir Thomas Beecham in K 201 as I sign up as a Period Practice Nosferatu. For instance, listen to your account of K 319. Mozart unleashes a wave of nostalgia and longing in the opening bars of the finale's development. Jeggy, strong emotions have never been your forte. You skip through it with . . . with . . . brisk efficiency, I hate to say. It short-changes both Mozart and the listener. Imagine the poor bugger who is new to classical music; what would be their impression of the composer if this disc came their way too soon?

JEG: This interview is over. Get off my farm! Caruthers, unleash the hounds!
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