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Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos.20 & 27

Mitsuko Uchida Audio CD
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £12.19 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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MITSUKO UCHIDA – BIOGRAPHY
“Uchida is, simply, Uchida – an elegant, deeply musical interpreter who strikes an inspired balance of head and heart in everything she plays.”
Chicago Tribune
Mitsuko Uchida was born in Atami, near Tokyo and moved to Vienna when she was twelve years old. She studied with Richard Hauser at the Vienna Academy of Music, and later with ... Read more in Amazon's Mitsuko Uchida Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos.20 & 27 + Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 9 & 21 + Mozart Piano Concertos 23 & 24
Price For All Three: £36.37

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Product details

  • Audio CD (10 Jan 2011)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • ASIN: B004BRXSHK
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 118,586 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.20 in D minor, K.466 - 1. Allegro15:18Album Only
Listen  2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.20 in D minor, K.466 - 2. Romance 9:35£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.20 in D minor, K.466 - 3. Rondo (Allegro assai) 8:31£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.27 in B flat, K.595 - 1. Allegro15:08Album Only
Listen  5. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.27 in B flat, K.595 - 2. Larghetto 7:32£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.27 in B flat, K.595 - 3. Allegro 9:38£0.79  Buy MP3 


Product Description

CD Description

Without question, Dame Mitsuko Uchida is recognized as among the greatest Mozart interpreters of our time. On her latest disc she continues her series of Mozart concerto recordings with the Cleveland Orchestra, performing two of the composer’s most popular concerti: No.20 (K.466) & No.27 (K.595).

Distinctly different from her first recordings of these works, these new recordings see her directing the orchestra from the keyboard, in line with performances of Mozart’s day.

“Mitsuko Uchida, directing Mozart concertos from the Steinway, and doing so with such ease and infectious pleasure in making music... who wants (or needs) a separate conductor?” The Chicago Tribune commented.

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
To be honest, I do not understand previous reviews that accuse Uchida of playing Mozart too much like Bethoven or of being perfunctory, as I simply do not hear it.

Of course, there is an erroneous view of Mozart (not necessarily held by the reviewers with whom I disagree, but widespread) that insists he be played in an invariably sunny, insouciant manner, as if he were permanently high on life. This seems to me to be a product of a rather patronising 19C attitude to Mozart contradicted by a proper appreciation for the great, dark, D minor compositions and profoundly melancholy, contemplative works such as the "Dissonance" string quartet. Uchida's previous recording with the Cleveland of K488 and K491 sharply divided opinion and even I, who am an admirer of her latest mode of interpretation, deducted one star to reflect my doubt, but this latest offering has me wholly convinced. There is nothing heavy or dull about Uchida's playing: her runs and trills are as fleet and light as one could wish; she has a profoundly delicate and sensitive touch which enlivens the Allegro of K595 which is otherwise extraordinarily sombre, but not gloomy. Indeed, both concertos are Mozart as you haven't heard it played before but all the better for that: Uchida has a valid and coherent vision which communicates itself to the listener as something profound and touching.

Others have excoriated her "attempt" to conduct the Cleveland Orchestra as a misguided failure; again, I don't hear it. This is a great orchestra in harmony with a wonderful artist. There is a lovely natural balance to the sound.

I am no chauvinist but I consider Dame Mitsuko to be an adopted, naturalised national treasure. This is not the only way to play Mozart but remains personal, arresting and provocative.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mozart at its best.... 5 Oct 2011
By Adamos
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
This disc contains two of the greatest piano concerti ever written; indeed Beethoven so admired the d minor concerto that he provided cadenzas that have become almost compulsory. Yet somehow I have always found it an elusive piece. Mozart in d minor is always of interest. It is the key of the requiem, the string quartet K.421 and, perhaps most crucially, of the commendatore's music in Don Giovanni. Indeed it is often said that to play the concerti, one must get to know first the operas. When one puts this together, one can see that what is required to play the Concerto in D minor (K.466) is an appreciation of Mozart's darker musical moments. It is the music of death, of reflections of mortality and, as the musicologist Alfred Einstein put it, `passion, pathos, drama'.

One finds these in abundance in Uchida's Cleveland recording of the concerto. Here is real gravitas, yet with that necessary elegance and refinement that is so essential in performing Mozart's music. This is not for those who seek lightweight, easy listening, but the serious music lover cannot help but be moved by the intensity of expression, the control of phrasing that finds emotional depth, tragedy and yet easefulness. I find myself wanting to quote Keats's easeful death. The slow movement is graceful yet profound and Uchida's pianism is superb, each phrase carefully placed, yet never predictable, with a beautiful legato that allows Mozart's melodic line to flow and grow with grace and sensitivity.

If the d minor concerto is Don Giovanni, then the B flat Concerto K595, is closer to Cosi Fan Tutte. A lighter weight opera, at least on the surface, it contains a comedy's potential for tragedy.
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4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Mozart is not Beethoven 2 April 2011
Format:Audio CD
Uchida's recordings of the Mozart sonatas are wonderfully in character with the time and the composer. Her interpretations of the piano concertos, or the other hand, are as if she is trying to move the time of their composition into the 19th century so they will sound more like Beethoven. But Mozart's piano concertos are so wonderfully unique and sublime that they lose their intrinsic character when played with the intensity and frills that Beethoven's concertos call for. These recordings, then, are bad Mozart and bad Beethoven. Stick with Goode, Schiff, and Perahia (and Brendel with the Scottish CO) for Mozart as Mozart. While their approaches are markedly different, they each express Mozart's amazing talents in this medium as I suspect he would have approved.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing downoad 23 Feb 2013
Format:MP3 Download|Verified Purchase
I was disappointed when I listened to this downloaded recording on iTunes. That could have something to do with the MacBook Pro laptop itself but with earphones it was not much better. It was my first download and I think next time I will buy the CD and download that on iTunes, which will give a much better result.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More profound, thoughful, melancholy Mozart from Uchida 7 Jun 2011
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
To be honest, I do not understand previous reviews that accuse Uchida of playing Mozart too much like Bethoven or of being perfunctory, as I simply do not hear it.

Of course, there is an erroneous view of Mozart (not necessarily held by the reviewers with whom I disagree, but widespread) that insists he be played in an invariably sunny, insouciant manner, as if he were permanently high on life. This seems to me to be a product of a rather patronising 19C attitude to Mozart contradicted by a proper appreciation for the great, dark, D minor compositions and profoundly melancholy, contemplative works such as the "Dissonance" string quartet. Uchida's previous recording with the Cleveland of K488 and K491 sharply divided opinion and even I, who am an admirer of her latest mode of interpretation, deducted one star to reflect my doubt, but this latest offering has me wholly convinced. There is nothing heavy or dull about Uchida's playing: her runs and trills are as fleet and light as one could wish; she has a profoundly delicate and sensitive touch which enlivens the Allegro of K595 which is otherwise extraordinarily sombre, but not gloomy. Indeed, both concertos are Mozart as you haven't heard it played before but all the better for that: Uchida has a valid and coherent vision which communicates itself to the listener as something profound and touching.

Others have excoriated her "attempt" to conduct the Cleveland Orchestra as a misguided failure; again, I don't hear it. This is a great orchestra in harmony with a wonderful artist. There is a lovely natural balance to the sound.

I am no chauvinist but I consider Dame Mitsuko to be an adopted, naturalised national treasure. This is not the only way to play Mozart but remains personal, arresting and provocative.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 100 Stars! 5 May 2011
By Kelvin Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Mitsuko Uchida is one of the few classical artists that continues to outdo herself every time she makes a new record. I have heard her previous recordings of these concertos with Jeffrey Tate and the English Chamber Orchestra. I own the Jandos set on Naxos, Malcolm Bilson playing the pianoforte under the direction of John Eliot Gardiner with the English Baroque Soloists, and Barenboim performing with Tate and the English Chamber Orchestra. I also have recently purchased a few of the John O'Conor - Mackerras collaborations on Telarc. As good as all of those versions are, the only thing I've heard recently that can even come close to this new recording (2nd in what I hope turns out to be a complete new Mozart Piano Concerto cycle) is Leon Fleisher's recording of 7, 12, and 23 with the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra.

Uchida takes a deeply lyrical approach to these pieces, and for the life of me, every time I listen to her play a Mozart, Beethoven, or Schubert sonata, or her Debussy etudes, it just takes my breath away...how anyone can make a piano sing, sparkle, and dance like an angel. Uchida has the strongest ability to convey melody, and ability to convey that in the purest, most lyrical sense of anyone I've heard. The balance between the piano and the orchestra, partly fantastic engineering and partly inspired conducting, yields the sweetest renditions of these concertos on record. Another thing I enjoy about these recordings is the left brain, right brain approach she takes with the performances. There's something here, as beautiful as these performances are, that sharply appeals to your intellect. The Cleveland Orchestra has never sounded better. Many recordings of works from the classical period tend to drown in reverb and echo, lose detail, so all you ever hear are the strings. Not here. The woodwinds and horns come through clear in the mix.

I need to live with these a while to say whether or not her performance at the piano is better. I would sound stupid saying her first version was perfect, and this is most perfect. But if you can improve on perfection with sound engineering, maturity, and inspiration - this would be what is sounded like. Buy this. Highly recommended. If I could give it 100 stars, I would and without hesitation. Like a fine wine, some things get better with age. And this is a knock out. I can hear them polishing off a another Grammy.

If you're still in doubt, listen to the previews. Just have your credit card out and ready.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mitsuko Uchida conveys the Viennese classical style 4 Jan 2012
By P. Adrian - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
For several years now, distinguished pianist Mitsuko Uchida has developed a close collaboration with the Cleveland Orchestra in performing Mozart concertos. The particular appeal of these performances resides in the fact that Uchida assumes the double role of conducting and playing the soloist part. This posture enables her to shape in a very personal vision the mozartean evergreens she interprets. The tempo, the airy phrasing, the refined rubato, even some unexpected accents she sprinkles here and there compound a valuable musical account, I dare say, a masterful one, for it receives that fresh and personal flavour that singles out the excellence.

Here, the two gems - K 466 and K 595 piano concertos - are performed in the purest Viennese style, with a special insight for the introspective side of the works and a flawless, playful finger-work. Highly recommended!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fine performances but not outstanding 18 July 2013
By C. Bellringer - Published on Amazon.com
The coupling of these two concertos repeats that of Curzon and Britten also on Decca. Those performance are now over forty years old and have a warmer violin tone and fuller piano than we are used to from modern performances. There are many performances of these concertos but both are very difficult pieces to interpret. K466 because it sets the standard of the time for minor key concertos ( together with K 491) and K595 is a sparely written work that has many shades and is full of emotionally turbulence. As to whether to play it in a valedictory manner is a question we are very unlikely ever to fathom.

The catalogue is full of moderately fine performances of both pieces but outstanding performances are rare. Curzon, despite the now old fashioned tone plays K466 in a wonderfully poetic way but with shades of beethovenian drama. The Romance is full of drama and Britten provides great support. Uchida is possibly the finest Mozart pianist of her day. The cadenzas breathe well and her eingangs are far more in keeping than Brendel, whose cadenzas, of his own writing, are not fine at all and seem out of character with K466. Despite Mackerras, a magnificent conductor of Mozart, Brendel's perfromances are not the finest in the catalogue.

Uchida should be compared to the standard set by Curzon, and the modern sound and her wonderful playing makes these very valuable contributions. Uchida is generally slower than Curzon and that is no bad thing except in the romance of K466 which I feel lacks any drive or real drama. I suspect drama was what Mozart was seeking. The key issue is the orchestra. The Cleveland plays well but frequently drops the tempo when joining after a piano solo. I have become more used to it over time. But as I remark Uchida chooses a slow tempo for all the movements and there is little scope for further slowing. It is not as noticeable once one listens to the pieces a few times,as Uchida's fine playing does command attention. But I have to say it is very surprising that the leader did not point out to Mitsuko that there are slowing downs which I am sure are unintentional. The romance lacks any thrill as a result. Just listen to Curzon to hear wonderful tension, rather sturm und drang.

So on balance I think Curzon is the preferred recording but these are fine performances, There is a final comment. I have not compared Mitsuko Uchida to Emil Gilels with the VPO and Karl Boehm, as regards K595. If you have not heard that recording, it simply has no equal of any Mozart concerto recording that I know of. Tempi are similar to Uchida, but there is no embellishment. All you hear is Mozart. It is an utterly astonishing performance from Gilels who it is claimed never played the piece prior to the recording. The Larghetto is played quite slowly but every note has a shade and an emphasis that is quite breathtaking in its simplicity. It is played with such wonderful poise that all of the emotion comes from Mozart, not the pianist. I have heard it called Olympian. That is not an overstatement.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tate performances superior 18 July 2013
By Diver - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I think Uchida is the foremost living Mozart piano interpreter. I heard her play Mozart live twice , and she blew my socks off both times. A third time I heard her play Beethoven. My socks stayed on. Musically, the piano playing on this CD is first rate. I'd maybe give the orchestra a B+. That said, the 21-year older Tate recordings are musically superior, both the orchestra and piano. To my ear, the piano in the Tate recordings has more magic. Conducting and playing may have been a bit too much for Uchida. At her best, her Mozart stands alone. A number of top pianists could match this performance, but note I said top. All of that said, from an audiophile perspective, the piano sound on this CD bests that of the Tate CD's. Maybe buy both?
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