Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

More Options
Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos.14 & 26 "Coronation"
 
See larger image
 

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos.14 & 26 "Coronation"

30 Jan. 2014 | Format: MP3

£4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £9.19 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Sąrl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
8:36
30
2
6:50
30
3
5:59
30
4
14:16
30
5
5:37
30
6
10:35
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 1993
  • Release Date: 30 Jan. 2014
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 1993 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 51:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001N2812S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 314,598 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By S. Sanders on 23 Feb. 2015
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Excellent
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 1 Sept. 2013
Format: Audio CD
On the eve of this recording, I visited Red Cross and donated a quart of Aussie O+ claret (in itself, it's a mixture of Celtic, Scottish and Anglo Saxon). That done, it was sent via express-post to a certain castle in Transylvania - yes, the abode of Count Claudio Abbado the Impaler. Trust me on this: the last thing the world needs is another prim, bloodless, `cold as the hair on a polar bear's bum' performance of Mozart from our vampiric friend. Was disaster averted? Sad to say, success was half mine: in retrospect, a second quart was required.

As my fellow wingman Kirk notes, this K 449 is superlative. Indeed, I'm surprised that the Impaler countenanced such virility from the Vienna Philharmonic in a Mozart concerto: how its double basses ruminate on the nature of things in the Andantino. Pires plays with panache and insight. I would not necessarily rate this performance above Serkin I or Zacharias / Maksymiuk but it certainly belongs in their august company: it's Five Stars for sure. As K 449 is such a masterpiece (did Mozart ever surpass it?) that's reason in itself to purchase this disc.

Ever so lamentably, the Coronation Concerto befalls a sanguinary doom at the fangs of our friend. For whatever mad reason, the Impaler skeletonizes the Vienna Philharmonic down to the bone. In consequence, the timpani and brass play (by necessity) a minimal role in proceedings. FFS - if you have a timpani in the score, don't be afraid of it!!! As if wary of the Lord of the Undead, Pires adopts a slightly narrower tone to her playing in the Larghetto: this is a mystery. Unlike Kirk, I am not overly bothered by her embellishments of the same-said movement. In summary, this is another instalment of Mozart from the Impaler with nary a drop of blood in its veins.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Very good #14;ditto re outer movements only in #26 1 Mar. 2013
By Kirk List - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The VPO here sounds quite reduced . This works better in #14 which is nearly chamber music. In both concerti Pires plays with panache and articulates cleanly. Abbado seemed to be oscillating between some of his
very fine later work, e.g. (Haydn #96, Sinfonia Concertante, and Trumpet concerto; Don Giovanni) and viral
Authenticism (Haydn #s 102 and 103 plus what I found an unlistenable Die Zauberflote- even his disappointing
Figaro was bearable by contrast).

In the live #26 Pires plays the outer movements as well as her entire #14, but the second movement is rushed, sounding more akin to an Allegretto than a proper Larghetto*. Even considering an incomplete left hand in the score, I consider the interpolations overkill. Alfred Brendel with Marriner takes a similar approach with like
results, thus marring unexcelled outer movements. So I believe that he must be heard anyway. Five star Coronations
remain Haebler/Rowicki/Philips and Tamas Vasary/DG. Haebler ornaments minimally and Vasary a bit more-neither
rushes the second movement. On lp Vasary also added a fine #14. That coupling is available now on Cassette only, but Vasary's #26 is still paired on CD with the Bohm/Gilels/VPO #27. Re Abbado in #26-listenable but
a bit anemic considering the original occasion-c.f. Rowicki/LSO, Vasary/BPO and Szell Casadesus/Cleveland (twice).

*Timings in the Larghetto of #26: Pires:5:38 Brendel/Marriner: 6:07 Vasary: 5:53 Haebler: 6:31
Szell with Casadesus : 1954-6:15 1962: 6:23

Peers in #14: Haebler/Davis/LSO/Philips; Brendel/Marriner/Philips; Gulda/Rosbaud/Hanssler
Mozart, Pires, And Abbado: From Vienna To Salzburg 4 April 2014
By Erik North - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
W.A. Mozart, one of the great geniuses in Western music, mastered so many sub-genres of classical music in his terribly abbreviated lifespan; but one that he excelled at like nobody's business was in the realm of the piano concerto. The sub-genre can count twenty-seven entries from the young man from Salzburg, plus two concert rondos (in A Major and D Major). And there isn't a single concert pianist worth his or her salt that can go through their career without at least doing a few of them either in concert or on recordings.

Such is the case with the Portuguese-born Maria Joao Pires, who on this recording, with help from Claudio Abbado and the vaunted Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, tackles two starkly different Mozart concertos, coming from two different periods in his life. The 14th, in E Flat Major, is a lighter work in tone and dates from 1784, the year of his most beloved opera "The Marriage Of Figaro"; while the 26th, in D Major, is a much grander work from four years later (with prominent trumpets and timpani in the outer movements), and, supposedly because he played it at the coronation of Leopold II as the Holy Roman Emperor in October 1790, is known as the Coronation Concerto. Pires, who also recorded the 17th and 21st concertos with Abbado (those with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe), handles these particular concertos with aplomb, even if the string section of the VPO is a bit large for the more chamber orchestra-like subtleties of the 14th. The more robust intensities of the orchestra, along with a more energetic style of pianism from Pires, are on display in the Coronation Concerto.

The 14th was recorded at the Great Hall of the Vienna Musikverein in March 1990; while the Coronation Concerto was recorded live in concert in April 1990 at the Grosse Festspielhaus in Mozart's hometown of Salzburg. And while it may not be one of the ultimate Mozart piano concerto recordings, it is nevertheless a very good one to have in one's collection.
An unalloyed pleasure 20 Sept. 2014
By Allen Walzem - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Very fine in every way. A top conductor with a top orchestra, both in fine form in an energized live performance. Joao-Pires plays with her usual dancing, vibrant, exquisitely executed articulation.
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Vamp Attack - One Down, One Saved 1 Sept. 2013
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
On the eve of this recording, I visited Red Cross and donated a quart of Aussie O+ claret (in itself, it's a mixture of Celtic, Scottish and Anglo Saxon). That done, it was sent via express-post to a certain castle in Transylvania - yes, the abode of Count Claudio Abbado the Impaler. Trust me on this: the last thing the world needs is another prim, bloodless, `cold as the hair on a polar bear's bum' performance of Mozart from our vampiric friend. Was disaster averted? Sad to say, success was half mine: in retrospect, a second quart was required.

As my fellow wingman Kirk notes, this K 449 is superlative. Indeed, I'm surprised that the Impaler countenanced such virility from the Vienna Philharmonic in a Mozart concerto: how its double basses ruminate on the nature of things in the Andantino. Pires plays with panache and insight. I would not necessarily rate this performance above Serkin I or Zacharias / Maksymiuk but it certainly belongs in their august company: it's Five Stars for sure. As K 449 is such a masterpiece (did Mozart ever surpass it?) that's reason in itself to purchase this disc.

Ever so lamentably, the Coronation Concerto befalls a sanguinary doom at the fangs of our friend. For whatever mad reason, the Impaler skeletonizes the Vienna Philharmonic down to the bone. In consequence, the timpani and brass play (by necessity) a minimal role in proceedings. FFS - if you have a timpani in the score, don't be afraid of it!!! As if wary of the Lord of the Undead, Pires adopts a slightly narrower tone to her playing in the Larghetto: this is a mystery. Unlike Kirk, I am not overly bothered by her embellishments of the same-said movement. In summary, this is another instalment of Mozart from the Impaler with nary a drop of blood in its veins.

If you want to hear the Coronation Concerto being played majestically 'to the ends of the earth', Christian Zacharias, aptly supported by the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra under the baton of David Zinman, is highly recommendable (Mozart: Pno Ctos Nos 25 & 26). The performance dates from the mid-Eighties: it sounds sensational. Nor in way of preparation should you load up on holy water or affix a crucifix to the front-door.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category