Mozart: Mass in C minor, K.427
 
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Mozart: Mass in C minor, K.427

Raymond Leppard/New Philharmonia Orchestra/Soloists
28 Nov 2005 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
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8:09
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2:52
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4:53
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1:30
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2:52
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6:27
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4:17
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0:46
30
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4:12
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3:58
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8:28
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2:03
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2:16
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6:30

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 28 Nov 2005
  • Release Date: 6 Jun 2006
  • Label: EMI Classics
  • Copyright: c 2000 EMI Records ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 59:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001INUZ26
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 390,699 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 21 Mar 2013
Format: Audio CD
`Numinous' is a lovely word from Latin. It denotes the Otherness which has haunted mankind since our inception. All too often, the temptation is there to gazette it as dogma; thankfully it defies encryption into mere words and flimsy ones at that.

Furtwangler once suggested that the Pontifex Maximus of his time should promulgate the Bruckner Ninth as a sacred score. It's an apt choice. Personally, I would have nominated K 427. It's the only rival to the B Minor Mass (Beethoven's Missa Solemnis has its moments but the Credo is a chore).

Mozart's Mass in C Minor never loses its ability to astonish. I remember when I first came into its gravitational field in 1986 (it was this recording on LP). I must have played the Kyrie ten times over. I thought to myself: how could mere flesh and blood be midwife to such transcendence? I still do not know the answer. We have lost six of the seven Ancient Wonders of the World; they matter not when this Kyrie is extant and at our fingertips. Surely that moment in the Kyrie where the soprano momentarily defers to the choir (here, at 3'27") offers a beatific glimpse into the "still point of the turning world." Yes, K 427 reflects the Canon of the Mass but it tells the wider tale of salvation as promulgated by the Old Firm: Genesis (Credo), Christmas (Et Incarnatus est), the Passion (Qui Tollis) and the Apocalypse (Sanctus & Osanna) where the Alpha and Omega, Beginning and End, makes all things new.

This recording from February 1973 is one of the best ten performances of Mozart on record - and that is more of an ex cathedra statement than any declaration from the Old Firm.
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