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Mozart: Symphonies Nos.39 & 40

Mozart: Symphonies Nos.39 & 40

13 Apr 2010

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Product details

  • Label: harmonia mundi
  • Copyright: (c) 2010 harmonia mundi s.a.
  • Total Length: 1:05:11
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00B585NDU
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 333,708 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Beautifully played and interpreted. String sound is wonderful. If you've moved out of the mid 20th century you'll love this. Karajan is fine for shopping malls and background music, but if you want to hear how Mozart should be played give this disc a go!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Lynch on 3 Sep 2014
Format: Audio CD
I dislike writing wholly negative reviews, however on reading some of the misinformation and mendacious nonsense advanced in some of the other reviews of this CD I feel unable to maintain a dignified silence.

One of my fellow reviewers condemns both Klemperer and Karajan as being exemplars, indeed the apogee of the 19th century romantic performing tradition. To accuse Klemperer particularly of being a "Romantic" demonstrates a fundamental ignorance of the history of 20th Century music performance. To label Furtwangler and Walter as exemplars of the 'Romantic Tradition' (which by the way is not an intrinsically pejorative term) would be reasonable, but to label Klemperer as such is arrant nonsense. If we could attach any label to Klemperer it would have to be "Objectivist" as he was one of the musical doyens of the "Die Neue Sachlichkeit" or "New Objectivity". In fact in a performance of a Mozart symphony by Walter when he made an unmarked ritard. Klemperer stood up, shouted "Warum?" and stormed noisily out of the hall. He was a champion of the works of Hindemith, Stravinsky, Schoenberg and Weill placing him very much in the Neoclassical tradition. He was among the first conductors of his generation to perform Beethoven's 9th in Beethoven's orchestration rather than Wagner's.

One could even argue that for his time he was at the vanguard of the HIP movement when it came to the interpretation of the music of J.S. Bach. He was one of the first 20th C. conductors to perform Bach, using the Urtexte with reduced forces, solo instruments, no vibrato and terraced dynamics.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 30 Aug 2014
Format: Audio CD
There's nothing new under the sun - perhaps. The novelty in this particular performance and its companion Mozart: Symphonies Nos. 38 "Prague" & 41 "Jupiter" is to relish anew how anaemic strings can sound when they are subjected to Hogwoodisation. Praised be the timpani & woodwind - but do they save the day?

Servilely, Jacobs pays obeisance to the HIP Wailing Wall: squeezed phrasing; vibrato-less strings; softening of cadential endings and the repudiation of any "anachronistic expression". For better or worse - mainly the latter - it's all here.

There's no more hyped HIP combo than Jacobs and the Freiburgers, but does he say anything fundamentally different than Gardiner Mozart: Symphonies 40 & 41 Corporal Hogwood Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: The Symphonies Vol. VI, Paris & Vienna 1778-1788 - The Academy of Ancient Music / Christopher Hogwood Sgt. Pinnock (in particular) Complete Mozart Symphonies or Harnoncourt Symphonies 39-41, to say nothing of their Pale Rider imitators such as Abbado? As Naxos demonstrated, there's so much great repertoire that has yet to be recorded once, let alone for the five hundredth time. Accordingly, a newcomer in this crowded field needs to be comet-like to disturb allegiances and justify its existence per se.
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