£69.95 + £1.26 UK delivery
In stock. Sold by EliteDigital UK

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
rbmbooks Add to Basket
£71.94
thebookcomm... Add to Basket
£72.25
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Mozart: Don Giovanni [Box set]

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart , Wilhelm Furtwängler , Vienna State Opera Chorus , Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra , Tito Gobbi , et al. Audio CD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £69.95
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product details

  • Performer: Tito Gobbi, Ljuba Welitsch, Dame Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Irmgard Seefried
  • Orchestra: Vienna State Opera Chorus, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Conductor: Wilhelm Furtwängler
  • Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Audio CD (6 Oct 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Salzburg Festival Edition
  • ASIN: B000006DEE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 169,787 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Sinfonia - VPO/Wilhelm Furtwangler
2. Act I, Scene I: Intro: Notte E Giorno Faticar - Erich Kunz/Ljuba Welitsch/Tito Gobbi/Josef Greindl
3. Act I, Scene I: Recitativo: Leporello, Ove Sei? - Erich Kunz/Tito Gobbi
4. Act I, Scene I: Recitativo & Duetto: Ah Del Padre - Ljuba Welitsch/Anton Dermota
5. Act I, Scene II: Recitativo: Orsu, Spicciati Presto - Erich Kunz/Tito Gobbi
6. Act I, Scene II: Aria: Ah, Chi Mi Dice Mai/Recitativo: Chi E La? - Erich Kunz/Tito Gobbi/Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
See all 20 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Act I, Scene III: Recitativo: Io Deggio Ad Ogni Patto - Tito Gobbi
2. Act I, Scene III: Aria: Finch'han Dal Vino - Tito Gobbi
3. Act I, Scene IV: Recitativo: Masetto, Senti Un Po' - Irmgard Seefried/Alfred Poell
4. Act I, Scene IV: Aria: Batti, Batti, O Bel Masetto - Irmgard Seefried
5. Act I, Scene IV: Recitativo: Guarda Un Po' - Tito Gobbi/Irmgard Seefried/Alfred Poell
6. Act I, Scene IV: Finale: Presto, Presto, Pria Ch'ei Venga/Tra Quest'arbori Celata/Bisogno Aver... - Ljuba Welitsch/Tito Gobbi/Anton Dermota/Elisabeth Schwarzkopf/Irmgard Seefried...
See all 23 tracks on this disc
Disc: 3
1. Act II, Scene II: Recitativo: In Quali Eccessi-/Aria: Mi Tradi Quell'Alma Ingrata - Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
2. Act II, Scene III: Scena: Ah, Ah, Ah, Questa E Buona - Erich Kunz/Tito Gobbi
3. Act II, Scene III: Duetto: O Statua Gentilissima - Erich Kunz/Tito Gobbi
4. Act II, Scene IV: Recitativo: Calmatevi, Idol Mio! - Ljuba Welitsch/Anton Dermota
5. Act II, Scene IV: Recitativo & Aria: Crudele?-Troppo Mi Spiace/Non Mir Dir, Bell'idol Mio - Ljuba Welitsch
6. Act II, Scene V: Finale: Gia La Mensa E Preparata - Erich Kunz/Tito Gobbi/Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
See all 8 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Live recording of the incomparable Furtwaengler 27 Mar 2005
Buy this recording for the performance and live with its shortcomings in the mere mechanical reproduction of sound.
This is the earlier of the two live recordings of Furtwaengler conducting "Don Giovanni" at the Salzburg Festival. It offers the ultimate Romantic take on the opera. (The famous movie version is yet a third performance with essentially the same cast as the second, save for the substitution of Lisa Della Casa for Elizabeth Schwarzkopf as Donna Elvira. What vocal riches existed in those belt-tightened, post-WWII days!)
This performance must surely be the most dramatic ever captured on disk. Tito Gobbi was a remarkably treacherous, almost too intelligent Don. Anton Dermota did not have the most beautiful voice or the longest breath control, but his command of both the dramatic and musical requirements of Ottavio, Tamino and Ferrando made him the finest Mozart tenor on any stage. And Lizzie Blackhead, love her or loathe her, was the best Donna Elvira of the Twentieth Century. Every singer exceeds his or her normal limitations under the hand of the mighty conductor.
The later recording, with Cesare Siepi as the Don, was captured in better sound. Get them both. And get the wonderful Glyndbourne set under the graceful touch of Fritz Busch, too. It is the only performance that can stand with Furtwaengler's.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Don Corleone of Dons 10 Oct 2014
There is one reason to acquire this live performance from the 1950 Salzburg Festival: Tito Gobbi as Don Giovanni. There is none of the suave amiability of a Samuel Ramey here: he's vicious. American Psycho meets Casanova. Gobbi is in clover and sings the role elatedly. Nothing short of God is going to stop him. It's no wonder the cosmos intervenes to curtail this mincing-machine - and that's why his portrayal is so potent. The voice itself is aureate.

Post-war Vienna was a hotbed of great Mozartians and the likes of Dermota, Kunz and the immortal Seefried contribute greatly to the success of this venture. The libretto contains a wonderful photo of Furtwangler at his most avuncular with Ljuba Welitsch. It's no wonder he's smiling - what a Donna Anna: power, precision and tonal beauty. Her vocal acting is superlative - hail the harpy!

Re the contribution of one Elisabeth Schwarzkopf: I felt like ringing the local council to inform them that a feral cat on heat had taken up residence in my house and needed to be evicted. Her diction is laudable . . . .

Furtwangler was such a natural Mozartian, I do not understand why anyone has to invoke his Wagnerian credentials to account for this triumph. Much like his singers, the conductor is superbly attuned to Mozart. How the Supper Scene blazes with intensity - but it's no salute to Gotterdammerung. Galvanised by his leadership, the Vienna Philharmonic plays with incandescence and finesse. Its mishaps are easy to behold and just as easy to ignore. The hapless accompanist livens up recitatives like few others: come Monday morning, it was back to the rubber chicken factory for our friend. To my ears, the recording is damned good for 1950.

Kierkegaard urged us to "listen, listen, listen to Don Giovanni!" - he must have had a performance of this mettle in mind. Lock up your daughters and sharpen your swords if such a Don is afoot!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER
The greatest strength of this recording, despite the superlative conducting of Furtwängler and the warmth of the VPO, is the degree to which characters are differentiated vocally and dramatically.

The vocal personalities here are utterly apt and distinct: Gobbi, with his clean high baritone and flickering vibrato, is incisive and seductive with a distinctly sadistic side and I find this wholly appropriate to the Don, who is really not so alluring a personality behind his superficially impressive animal drive. Erich Kunz's slightly lumpen, rotund bass-baritone makes an excellent contrast with the suave Don; for once master and servant are instantly identifiable the moment they open their mouths. The real revelation for me here was Welitsch's noble, bright and fearless Donna Anna: her pitch is spot on and she brings some of Nilsson's steely, open assurance to her singing, suggesting a purity and naivety which are just right for the part. The voice sounds huge. By contrast, Schwarzkopf's Elvira is far warmer and earthier - febrile and hysterical as it should be - and as well sung as anything I've heard her do. Poell is bland but fine as Masetto; Seefried is pretty as Zerlina. Greindl is rough but imposing as the Commendatore. Dermota is sometimes short of breath but somehow so pleasing with his plangent tone and impeccable phrasing.

Ignore the odd blip and the plonking harpsichord; tolerate the limited but clean mono sound; revel in Furtwängler's sure command - and enjoy a collection of the finest voices to be found in Salzburg that summer - or in any season, era or location - performing a masterwork.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
By Stanley Crowe TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Furtwangler's "Don Giovanni" is a bit slow in places for my taste, but that was true of Klemperer's studio-recorded "Cosi" as well, and as with that recording here the conductor has singers who are well able to handle his tempi and still be expressive. Unfortunately, and perhaps not unsurprisingly for a 1950 live recording, the sound is poor. The orchestra is often distorted, and in general the men's voices suffer less than the women's. With all that said, though, there are some things worth hearing here. Gobbi's baritone is firm, and he sings with great conviction. It's not a glamorous voice, but it's good to hear, for it's probably in the range for which Mozart originally conceived the role, and while we've grown used to the beauty of Siepi and Ghiaurov, the basso exponents on record, this is a different experience. The microphone doesn't flatter Gobbi's voice particularly, but he comes across fine. Erich Kunz's Leporello is just sensationally sung, and the microphones catch him better than they do any other singer -- did he know where they were placed!? The set is worth hearing for him alone -- beautiful tone, excellent dramatic instincts, as good as any on record. I've never liked Dermota's studio Ottavio on the Kleiber recording, where it sounds pinched and nasal. Here he sounds wonderful, and if he's a bit taxed by the runs in "Il mio tesoro," that's perhaps partly Furtwangler's fault. The tone is golden, and the final track, on which the sound is very messy, is worth playing just to hear Dermota make his final plea to Donna Anna. Poell is a bit square and unyielding as Masetto, but Greindl is a wonderful statue in the final scene, singing with tremendous authority and giving the words their due too. Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Don Corleone of Dons 26 Jan 2012
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
There is one reason to acquire this live performance from the 1950 Salzburg Festival: Tito Gobbi as Don Giovanni. There is none of the suave amiability of a Samuel Ramey here: he's vicious. American Psycho meets Casanova. Gobbi is in clover and sings the role elatedly. Nothing short of God is going to stop him. It's no wonder the cosmos intervenes to curtail this mincing-machine - and that's why his portrayal is so potent. The voice itself is aureate.

Post-war Vienna was a hotbed of great Mozartians and the likes of Dermota, Kunz and the immortal Seefried contribute greatly to the success of this venture. The libretto contains a wonderful photo of Furtwangler at his most avuncular with Ljuba Welitsch. It's no wonder he's smiling - what a Donna Anna: power, precision and tonal beauty. Her vocal acting is superlative - hail the harpy!

Re the contribution of one Elisabeth Schwarzkopf: I felt like ringing the local council to inform them that a feral cat on heat had taken up residence in my house and needed to be evicted. Her diction is laudable . . . .

Furtwangler was such a natural Mozartian, I do not understand why anyone has to invoke his Wagnerian credentials to account for this triumph. Much like his singers, the conductor is superbly attuned to Mozart. How the Supper Scene blazes with intensity - but it's no salute to Gotterdammerung. Galvanised by his leadership, the Vienna Philharmonic plays with incandescence and finesse. Its mishaps are easy to behold and just as easy to ignore. The hapless accompanist livens up recitatives like few others: come Monday morning, it was back to the rubber chicken factory for our friend. To my ears, the recording is damned good for 1950.

Kierkegaard urged us to "listen, listen, listen to Don Giovanni!" - he must have had a performance of this mettle in mind. Lock up your daughters and sharpen your swords if such a Don is afoot!
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The hardest-hitting DonG 5 Sep 2008
By Theodore Shulman - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is still the most powerful performance of Don G available, with Furtwangler's Wagnerian brass, mass, and drama, Tito Gobbi's mostly scornful-and-snarling but still absorbingly multi-timbred and melodic Don (which is a role for a midrange baritone, not any kind of bass), Ljuba Welitsch's furious, piercing, and on-pitch Donna Anna, and Josef Greindl's inexorable, jagged Commendatore.

Some sense of Mozart's lightness gets restored by Irmgard Seefried, in one of the earlier of her ten million performances of her role, and by legendary funnyman Erich Kunz.

Eliz Schwarzkopf is fine if you're not allergic to cats. Alfred Poell is suitably anonymous as Masetto. The greatest weakness is a bumbling incompetent keyboard-player who screws up the accompaniment in so many recitatives that he very sadly makes it impossible to recommend this performance to anyone who doesn't already know the piece. Other performance errors range from amusing--Tito Gobbi jumps out and bellows "Ei he ha he, sei morto!" at Leporello and Donna Elvira at the wrong time and gets ignored--to pathetic--Anton Dermota takes unauthorized breaths in the long phrases of "Il mio Tesoro". The recording quality is problematic too. But the ensembles are pretty much error-free and the overall power of the performance is so great that none of these complaints matter.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sounding pretty good for a recording over sixty years old 1 Mar 2012
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
The greatest strength of this recording, despite the superlative conducting of Furtwängler and the warmth of the VPO, is the degree to which characters are differentiated vocally and dramatically.

The vocal personalities here are utterly apt and distinct: Gobbi, with his clean high baritone and flickering vibrato, is incisive and seductive with a distinctly sadistic side and I find this wholly appropriate to the Don, who is really not so alluring a personality behind his superficially impressive animal drive. Erich Kunz's slightly lumpen, rotund bass-baritone makes an excellent contrast with the suave Don; for once master and servant are instantly identifiable the moment they open their mouths. The real revelation for me here was Welitsch's noble, bright and fearless Donna Anna: her pitch is spot on and she brings some of Nilsson's steely, open assurance to her singing, suggesting a purity and naivety which are just right for the part. The voice sounds huge. By contrast, Schwarzkopf's Elvira is far warmer and earthier - febrile and hysterical as it should be - and as well sung as anything I've heard her do. Poell is bland but fine as Masetto; Seefried is pretty as Zerlina. Greindl is rough but imposing as the Commendatore. Dermota is sometimes short of breath but somehow so pleasing with his plangent tone and impeccable phrasing.

Ignore the odd blip and the plonking harpsichord; tolerate the limited but clean mono sound; revel in Furtwängler's sure command - and enjoy a collection of the finest voices to be found in Salzburg that summer - or in any season, era or location - performing a masterwork.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback