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Motty: Forty Years in the Commentary Box Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook, CD

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Virgin Audio (3 Sept. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846571995
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846571992
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 2.5 x 14.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 588,002 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'John Motson has for many years been the undisputed true voice of English football.' --Sir Bobby Robson

'Motty is, in the words of the old cliché, a legend in his own lifetime. He has brought knowledge of and passion for football direct into the homes of millions - he is a national institution, recognised and loved. He is also a thoroughly decent bloke.' --Tony Blair

'There is no doubting Motty is a footie hero ... this will be an ideal stocking-filler for dads at Christmas.' --News of the World

'Like Cheryl Cole and Lincolnshire sausages, John Motson is a national treasure to be cherished. From his verbal scraps with Brian Clough to the traumatic Hillsborough tragedy, his autobiography reveals the man behind the microphone.' --Sport Magazine

'John Motson is an institution and his commentaries on Match of the Day are part of the fabric of football. The BBC legend has been behind the microphone for 40 years, covering just about every big match going.'
--Metro

'Bright and breezy ... it reflects on a lifetime watching football matches big and small and of bumping into all the heroes of the game' --Sunday Express

'Motty's knowledge and passion for football are unrivalled as he shares his story for the first time with humour and honesty'
--Oxford Times

'Filled with a multitude of detail about Motson's background and the sporting times he lived through ... Motson is one of the most intelligent and accomplished commentators in history, a voice that has conveyed the best (and worst, depending on your allegiance) moments in the recent past of the game. His book offers a fascinating look at what goes on behind the scenes of football broadcasting, as well as a trip down memory lane for many supporters. A must-read for any football fan.'
--Sunday Business Post --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The much-loved voice of BBC football commentary looks back over his 40 year career

Inside This Book

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Bantam Dave TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 Nov. 2009
Format: Hardcover
John Motson has a bit of an image problem. Many people see him as a `train-spotter' type of person, with a head full of football statistics rather than the numbers of the rolling stock leaving Clapham Junction or Kings Cross. He is thought of as being a boring, just like the sheepskin coats that he will always be associated with. This is most unfair because he is a fine football commentator; he must be because how else could be have survived forty years at the BBC were he not?

Despite having a ringside seat at most of footballs major events like World Cups, European Championships and FA Cup finals and personally knowing many of the sports famous names his autobiography will do little to dispel his boring image because it is, quite frankly, dull.

Whilst it is a well written, easy read it is a little tame. The best autobiographies work because the writer reveals snippets of inside information about the people they know and the events they have been involved in that the reader will be interested to read about. Unfortunately John Motson fails to do this in this book because despite accumulating what must be a vast amount of inside knowledge he never really tells the reader anything that we haven't read many times before. Maybe because of his upbringing - his father was a clergyman - he his seldom overly critical of people neither. Even Alex Ferguson, with whom he has had various run- ins with over the years, escapes lightly. This may say much for Motsons decency it does not make for particularly engrossing reading.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By World of Dad on 30 Nov. 2009
Format: Hardcover
It's a refreshing change to find not only a biography of someone who is firstly, an expert in their field; secondly, has a long career at the top of their profession and, most importantly, can actually write. That John Motson started work in print journalism has stood him in good stead here. Motty is a highly entertaining mixture of nostalgia, insight and comment on the modern game. Unlike other reviewers, I didn't find the statistics at the end boring, but a memory-jogger of games I had been at or remember from Match of the Days past. This will be dipped into long after ghost-written hagiographies of today's cosseted players have been consigned to the charity shop.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By EMW on 11 Dec. 2009
Format: Hardcover
Had this book sent direct as birthday present for 30+ year old son who is avid Liverpool supporter. He has grown up listening to Motty commentate on matches and couldnt believe my great choice. He was well chuffed to receive it, and says it is a brill read as well as a momento on a great commentator!!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. C. Doyle on 5 Jan. 2010
Format: Hardcover
What a waste of my time reading this poor excuse of a biography. During radio advertisements the book is portrayed as a book which describes "Motty's" thoughts on the best teams and players he had witnessed and commentated upon during the past 40 odd years, yet these points are merely mentioned as an afterthought once the story has been concluded in an appendix at the back of the book.
So if you want a read which reflects his feelings regarding his own commentating technique which includes how his own voice has been proven to be the ideal acoustics for commentating, or his constant drones about misreading a big decision during a game, or his personal battle with Barry Davies and the BBC bigwigs in order to commentate on all the major games during a league, FA, European or World Cup then this is the book for you.
If on the other hand you wish to read Motty's own thoughts around the best players or team he has seen on a season by season basis and why he thought they were best then I'm afraid you will be sadly mislead by the advertising and spin given to help sell the book.
To give you an idea of what I'm talking about, let me describe "Motty's Best England Eleven" which is simply listed at the very back of the book and features a team of players which haven't been mentioned during the whole book. For example at no point during the whole book is an explanation for why he thinks Micky Mills is his first choice for the right-back position in the team, or why he thinks the five best games of all time are the best.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Neutral VINE VOICE on 20 Feb. 2010
Format: Hardcover
John Motson, in common with all good broadcasters, prepares assiduously for the live commentary. The two page example of his work in the second set of illustrations (Barnsley versus Chelsea FA Cup replay) shows just how much work goes into making a live football game run smoothly on air. I wish I could say as much for this book which proves how right Motson was to opt for radio and television work rather than print journalism.

Motson had a good reputation as a television commentator although it wasn't one I shared as a television watcher. Brian Clough sussed him out in an early interview when he accused a disconcerted Motson of lecturing to Match of the Day audiences rather than letting the game speak for itself in the action. In fact, Motson is appreciative of Clough's direct approach and provides him and his sidekick, Peter Taylor, with a complete chapter of their own. He records with sadness Clough's decline into alcoholism but remains unconvinced that he would have succeeded as England manager.

Motson comments on the various managers employed by England over the years rating Sir Alf Ramsay and Sven Goran Eriksson first and third, split only by Bobby Robson. I find his choice of Eriksson in the top three surprising. When England played ten man Brazil at the World Cup Eriksson's lack of tactical awareness was embarrassing to watch. His choice of the inexperienced and untried Theo Walcott for the 2006 World Cup was disastrous. Although short of strikers Walcott never got a game. Eriksson, as with his response to the failure against Brazil, was too stubborn to admit he got it wrong. He was successful in Italy but a failure in England and was not helped by being talked up by the inadequate players he selected for the national team.
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