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One More River Paperback – 1 Feb 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Barn Owl Books; New edition edition (1 Feb. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1903015634
  • ISBN-13: 978-1903015636
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 338,542 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"The author writes with a subtle blend of emotional honesty and eloquent restraint." The Guardian"

About the Author

Lynne Reid Banks was born in London. She spent the war years in Canada, and on her return trained at RADA and spent 5 years acting in repertory before joining ITN as the first British woman TV reporter. In 1962 she emigrated to Israel where she married, became an English teacher and had three sons. She returned to England with her family in 1971. She has written 40 books for adults and young readers including The Indian in the Cupboard, which sold over ten million copies worldwide. She lives in Dorset and London, travels extensively and writes full time.

To visit Lynne Reid Banks. website click here


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
It wouldn't have been so bad if Lesley had had any warning. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Jan. 2000
Format: Paperback
A brilliant book that tells the story of the early days of the state of Israel from the viewpoint of Lesley, a teenager who immigrates from Canada to live on a kibbutz. Initially she is not at all convinced, but gradually she comes to value her new identity. One of my favourite passages of dialogue (of all time!) is in this book, when Lesley and a young Arab boy discuss the seemingly bleak future of adult politics. When you read this you will also want to read the sequel set about twenty years later.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Barnes on 7 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback
This is the story of Lesley, a young teenager who has lived her whole life in Canada. She's a popular girl, has lots of friends, a nice boyfriend, a happy home life and is well provided for by her parents.

But then her parents decide that something's missing from their lives, and having already lost one child to a Catholic marriage, they are adamant that Lesley must grow up with a stonger sense of her Jewishness than her brother did before her. So, all of a sudden Lesley's parents decide it's time to sell up the family business and emigrate to Israel, taking Lesley with them. Lesley of course is horrified and cannot imagine leaving the Canada she knows and loves... However, Lesley doesn't truly realise what she's given up until she arrives at the kibbutz (near the Palestinian border) where they have decided to make a fresh start. With fewer creature comforts, less privacy and solitude, Lesley struggles to settle in... until she begins to become fascinated by a Palestinian boy she can see working with his donkey on the other side of the river...

This is a good book and educational but, although enjoyable, it's quite rough and stilted in style. Not a flowing read, so I'm not yet in a hurry to read the sequel, 'Broken Bridge'.
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By singingcapybara on 16 Mar. 2015
Format: Paperback
Riveting book about a young Canadian Jewish girl starting a new life on a Kibbutz in 1960s Israel. I found it hard to put down and was fascinated by kibbutz life
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fabulous book, I read this as a child and remembered about it after watching the news recently, enjoyed reading it even more as an adult.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 21 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Good story, serious topic. 7 May 2003
By L. Suha - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I originally read this book as a teenager and it literaly changed my life as I later went to live on a kibbutz and later still emigrated to Israel and lived there for several years. I bought this version as a gift to my Israeli daughter in part so that she can learn one of the reasons that she exists. I can't really comment on the changes as it is too long since I read the original.
Lesley is a rich and spoiled teenager living in Canada. her parents take her to live on a kibbutz in Israel. She has to share a room and to learn to live with almost no possesions. Starting as an outcast she gradually learns the language, adapts to working and learns to fit in to her new environment. She also develops a "relationship' with an Arab boy from across the river Jordan.
The story is set just before and during the 1967 Six Day War and helps to provide younger readers with an insight into the history of and politics of the time. It is simplistic in some ways but this is to be expected given the target age of its readers. It also helps to explain the optimism of the time and the assumption that Israeli occupation of the territories would be a short term thing - highly relevant given the ongoing conflict as many readers no doubt have questions about how it all started.
The story of Lesley is enjoyable for younger readers who will be able to relate to her and the history is a bonus. It is of course a story with only one point of view but I feel that it does begin to address the frustration of the Arabs in the area. This is further examined in the sequel "Broken Bridge".
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Original version was better, but still a good book 25 Dec. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: School & Library Binding
I see why the book had to be rewritten to bring the politics up to date. In rewriting the book, the the characterizations are more complex. For example, it is hinted that Lesley's mother was less enthusiastic about moving to Israel, than her father: this was not mentioned in the original book. Also the characterization of Lesley's father is shown more complexly: with more flaws.

However, in deepening the characters, the author has softened the initial depiction in the original book of Lesley as a spoiled B-R-A-T that you love to HATE, into a spoiled rich girl who is still likeable, and therefore the healing and transformation of Lesley into a young woman of cahracter, by her experience of the land of Israel and the kibbutz,
is a less dramatic, and thus a less interesting story.

However, this is still a highly enjoyable book for both teenagers and adults to read: n enjoyable powerful story of transformation and growing up. I would agree with another customer review that this book should be read along with the young adult novel "Habibi" by poet Naomi Shihab Nye, which tells about a Palestinian teenage girl about the same age as Lesley, so that readers can get both points of view: a discussion of how Lesley and Liyana both love the same land, and how and why they see it differently, could be educational.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I think that One More River was a good book. 30 Jan. 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I liked this book because it's interesting on every page and it's very realistic. In the beginning of the book I did not like Lesley, the main character. I did not like her because she was very snobby, self-centered, and she judged people by their looks and popularity too much. But as I read further into the book I liked Lesley because she was not snobby and she did not judge people by their looks and popularity as much. I recommend this book to people who like to read about teens and who want to learn about the Six Day war between Israel against all of it's neighbors.
Patricia Randolph 6th grade ASIJ
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A Remarkable Novel 1 May 2005
By Jayne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Banks writes about a complete, real-life situation about a Jewish family moving to find their genuine way of life. "A large part of the novel--set during the days before, during, and after the 1967 Six-Day War--chronicles Lesley's gradual, difficult adjustment, and her growing friendship from afar with Mustapha, an Arab boy. The story is fleshed out with numerous details about kibbutz life, farming, and military maneuvers, which bring a sense of realism." (Fader). Fader provides a perfect description of the plot of the book. Banks also includes Yiddish words with a glossary, which enhances the reading comprehension of the book for knowledge of a different language. This is a top rate novel for kids or teens, especially whom are interested in the Jewish religion, traveling, and war. "The story is set just before and during the 1967 Six Day War and helps to provide younger readers with an insight into the history of and politics of the time. It is simplistic in some ways but this is to be expected given the target age of its readers. It also helps to explain the optimism of the time and the assumption that Israeli occupation of the territories would be a short term thing - highly relevant given the ongoing conflict as many readers no doubt have questions about how it all started." (Shapiro).
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
The best novel about the Arab-Isreali conflict, ever. 30 April 2000
By "fiammetta" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Never mind that it's a young adult book. Lynne Reid Banks' work has such a vast scope, it should not be missed by anyone.
The book is set in 1968. Lesley is a typical teenager. She's always trendily dressed, always popular, always the envied one. Then her father announces that the entire family is going to emigrate to Israel. She cries, pleads, threatens, but soon enough they arrive on a border kibbutz. Lesley doesn't speak Hebrew, can't do much in the way of chores, and is at first treated like anathema by her peers. Meanwhile, the conflict between Israel and Jordan escalates. Across the River Jordan, surprisingly lacking in width or depth, she observes over time a young boy whose loneliness reminds her of herself. Despite knowing better, Lesley cannot imagine him an enemy. When war breaks out, the world of the kibbutz seems terribly fragile, but Lesley finds herself fighting as desperately as her neighbors to hold on.
The relationship between Lesley and Mustapha, however brief, is one of the most unforgettable I've ever read about. The final scene of the book still haunts me. I reread it at least once a year.
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