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More Parts Per Million [VINYL]

4 customer reviews

Price: £13.25 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Amazon's The Thermals Store

Music

Image of album by The Thermals

Photos

Image of The Thermals

Biography

Over the course of seven years and four LP's, The Thermals have tackled a variety of subjects with no small amount of passion and fervor. Religion, politics, death, these are some heavy themes! Yet The Thermals have irreverently run roughshod over these topics with excesses of moxie and gusto, the likes of which the post/punk/pop/power/etc. community had never before seen! Now, for ... Read more in Amazon's The Thermals Store

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Product details

  • Vinyl (31 Aug. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sub Pop
  • ASIN: B00008AY70
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 488,988 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. It's Trivia
2. Brace and Breaks
3. No Culture Icons
4. Goddamn the Light
5. Out of the Old and Thin
6. I Know the Pattern
7. Time to Lose
8. My Little Machine
9. Overgrown, Overblown!
10. A Passing Feeling
11. Back to Gray
12. Born Dead
13. An Endless Supply

Product Description

Sealed, coloured vinyl

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By B. Marwood VINE VOICE on 30 Jan. 2004
Format: Audio CD
It seems that everything coming from America these days is rock-by-numbers, uninventive and uninspired. Sub Pop probably realised this, and that’s probably why they unleashed The Thermals onto an unsuspecting world. Probably. Far from being generic rock, the Thermals exhibit a distorted, twisted lo-fi sound where songs are ejected at roughly 200mph before disappearing even quicker than they arrived.
Opener ‘It’s Trivia’ is one of the more relaxed songs on the album in terms of tempo, but definitely sets the scene for the rest of the album as vocalist Hutch Harris half sings/screams over the top of the simplest of two-note riffs and distorted drums. It’s like the best bits of Ikara Colt, Mclusky and the Parkinsons all rolled into one. By the time second track ‘Brace and Break’ kicks in, swiftly followed by the single ‘No Culture Icons’, the Thermals sound like they’re at breaking point. This is probably because “More Parts Per Million” was recorded on a 4-track in Hutch Harris’ bedroom, so the mix is incredibly “dirty”. If you’re looking for glossy, hi-fi, expensive production music you’ll have to shop elsewhere.
Similarly, if you’ve heard a Thermals song and are unimpressed, you’re probably not going to like this. There is only one sound on this album: fast, loud, distorted lo-fi-punk. There is no big anthem and no Slow Song About Love. Normally this singular sound would be detrimental to an album, but “More Parts Per Million” just isn’t long enough to get boring. With the average length of a Thermals song being two minutes, this 13-track album is over within half an hour.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Well, I bought this on the strength of some magazine review that mentioned "spiky, punky pop" and I wasn't disappointed (although it does remind me of Placebo in Nancy Boy mode at times, which isn't a bad thing in my book).
Quite whether it will stand the test of time (like say Marquee Moon by Television), well that's debateable but it certainly stands out as one of this best albums this year - unlike most of the new wave of overhyped garage bands (I'm thinking Datsuns et al), The Thermals display a handy skill: the ability to right damn good songs!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "ross_hallett" on 12 Mar. 2003
Format: Audio CD
The thermals sound like a Guided by Voices being fed on too much cheap orange squash. This hyperactive debut arrives in a crashing mess of distorted vocals which is soundtracked by a noise that could buckle under its own energy.
The album was originally recorded on a four-track cassette recorder in one of the band member's house. These thirteen fun snippets of punk infused lo-fi generate an exciting live feel that at a mere twenty seven minutes and forty six seconds does not out stay its welcome. I bought the album on the strength of the single "No Culture Icons" and was slightly disappointed by the rest of the album but only because this is a very good song.
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Format: Audio CD
Read this somewhere and totally agree!! "Snowballing so perfectly together, the words feel made for each other" Everything is so simple, why someone already hasn't done it eludes me- the band are so unique. Go and buy this albumn if you're into garage rock type bands.(even if not it may change your mind- it did mine!)
support the unknown!(downloading isn't big or clever!)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 13 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Give it a listen 2 Dec. 2003
By Michael Thomas Di Natale - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
A friend of mine recommend the band to me last week and I've become hooked on their album, "More Parts Per Million." If you're an indie rock person, give it a listen. If your a Pavement fan, you NEED to give this record a listen. If you've been enjoying the Rock Revial stuff that the media has been jamming down our throats, give something truly orginal a chance.
Do not overlook this record.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
I can't stop thinking about you...hardly art, hardly garbage 30 Mar. 2003
By Pedro A. Urias - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I hear this being called a Northwest all-star conglomeration with the players from the bands Hutch and Kathy, Kind of Like Spitting and the All Girl Summer Fun Band. But this one coalesces into the perfect lo-fi 90's punk gem. The energy is infectious, the songs out and out blazing displays of great hooks and killer tunes. Even the element of its lo-fi recording circumstances are part of the songs in and of themselves, as the buzz and hiss from the 4-track adds the air of spontaneity and energy lacking in quite a few bands that we are forced to deal with on the mainstream and God yes, the "alternative" circuit. The best songs here are "No Cultural Icons" (a nice swipe at rock and roll idolatry with terrific drumming), "An Endless Supply", the rocketing opener "It's Trivia" and "I Know the Pattern". Great stuff and it doesn't sound at all like Guided by Voices (too lethargic to even resemble this band...except for the lo-fi circumstances). Get this now and see them live. I can't stop thinking about you...
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Intelligent Lo-Fi Pop 9 April 2003
By Kindle Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Enthusiasm and intelligence are the two advantages Sub Pop's Thermals have over the lo-fi rocker hoi polloi.
The Portland, OR, group made up of ex-Hutch and Kathy, Kind of Like Spitting, and Operacycle, attack their simple songs on More Parts Per Million with verve like a Beat Happening hopped up on ephedrine and one too many Dr Peppers. The interest and eagerness are impressive, a welcome relief from the redundant cynicism that plagues and devours indie rock to this day.
Underneath the basic song structures, fast chords strummed with fury, is a musical mind, and a rabid wit lyricism that creates lasting songs, pop word nuggets to chew on long after the last track has played. At first listen, the music sounds hook free, fill free, all basics, like some one picking up their guitar for the first time and turning out an opus ala The Mountain Goats. Beneath and behind Ben Barnett's tin guitar assault is a bass bounce, and snare drum exclamation that adds depth and dance-ability to their sound.
Hutch Harris wraps his high-pitched, you-either-love-it-or-hate-it voice, around words sung sincere with great thought put into them. On "Back To Grey" take for example "I don't need any love/ because I've got the elements/Electric Light/Electric License." The entire album is saturated with word play like this, clever without being cloying.
The album is maximum low-fidelity, with the emphasis on LO. If it's true that Dave Davies put holes in his amp's speaker to get the nasty sound on early Kink's tracks, than maybe the Thermals put big holes in every speaker, their instruments, and the console, and ran over the tape a few times for good measure to get that authentic sludge sound.
More Parts Per Million is a great album and a great idea. My only fear is that this new sound may not last being stretched across several albums. It's one time brilliance that may be tarnished by repetition.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
thermalito 14 Jan. 2005
By Dustin M. Granville - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The thermals have intellectual and kinda scientific lyrics. Their sound is thrashy, distortiony, and reverby. Great live band. You'll quickly fall in and out love with the album--then you'll just be friends afterwards. Loud, howling, and impossible not to tap foot or bob head to.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
I know the pattern. 4 Mar. 2003
By Nick Danger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Dissonent, noisy, and sometimes monotonous. But there's something there that I can't put my finger on. I hear elements of Death Cab for Cutie with a little bit of Neurosis. Or maybe if The Dillinger Four had band practice with Radio Four. But, somehow, after only one listen, this band drew me in and I started developing favorite songs and listening to it more and more. And now I get it. I just don't know what "it" is.
Let me try to describe the sound as best as I can. Sub Pop. We're talking old school Sub Pop: Lo-Fi everything. Superdistorted guitar, bass, vocals, and even drums. But all of this noise comes together to create its own type of pop music. Quick, catchy, and very poignant, this CD is fresh. And fun. And noisy.
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