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Moravagine Paperback – Oct 1990


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Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Blast Books,U.S. (Oct. 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0922233047
  • ISBN-13: 978-0922233045
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 14 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,764,658 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Black Glove on 12 Oct. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A young physician with nihilistic leanings helps an "incurable" patient named Moravagine to escape from a lunatic asylum. Thereafter the two men embark on a globe-trotting escapade taking in, amongst other things, the Russian Revolution and World War I.

This is a bold and entertaining novel written in a muscular style which is at once insightful, direct and, I suppose, pretty harsh in its outlook. Yes it could be said that, as a whole, it doesn't quite hang together - for instance: Moravagine's character seems to shift between Jack the Ripper, Quasimodo and Hugh Hefner, and sometimes he (Moravagine) appears to be tacked on as a freakish sideshow to the narrator's strange adventures and anarchistic thoughts.

All in all I'd define the novel as an intense, flamboyant and peculiar vision, flawed only by its untamed ambition.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Scott Baker on 15 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This man needs help! The title, I am reliably informed, means Death by Vagina. At certain points the minutiae is intense and poetic (Cendrars was a gifted poet). There are some laugh-out-loud sequences. Then we go on fleeting prosodic bouts whipping from country to country following the characters, forcing the narrative along like a dull battering ram, and the book becomes a trial to read. Perhaps it should have been kept as a short story or the better parts crafted into a long poem. If you like weird fare for literature, give this one a go. I wouldn't queue up a second time to endure it.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By H. Tee on 24 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a strange modern classic written by Cendrars in 1926. It is a fantastic tale, a hint of `Master and Marguarita' crossed with Don Quixote with a hint of McCarthy's `No country for old men' but nothing supernatural occurs. I understand it has elements of autobiography ?. It is a linear but very descriptive and provocative narrative which occasional deviates to give opinions on war, women or revolution. The tale itself could not be said to be gory or `x' rated.

This is a tale not so much of Moravagine himself but of the unnamed psychiatrist narrator (Cendrars himself makes a cameo entrance near the end of the story) who travels with him. Moravagine is a 28 year old psycho locked up by his Austrian royal family in 1894 for murdering his arranged bride and other associated madness behaviour like killing his dog on a whim. The narrator seems to fall fascinated with Moravagine and quickly helps him to escape; Moravagine takes the opportunity to murder the first young girl he meets. The pair then undertake travels first to Berlin (which ends in a murder spree). They then go for a long period in Russia engaging in the revolutionary turmoil; a key character is a woman Mascha who Moravagine falls for. It is in Russian that Moravagine seems to control himself and thereafter appears to cease his mad murdering transposing as it were this to the violent era; the narrator and Moravagine appear to be quite happy to plant bombs - they end up needing to make a hasty escape to England and then America. They then meet Lathuille who takes them up the river Orinoco and some adventure with the head shrinking native Indians ensues - here Moravagine is most normal perhaps.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By vince o'neill on 27 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 13 reviews
20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Exquisitely depraved travelogue 25 Dec. 2007
By mostserene1 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This may be described as an exquisitely depraved travelogue of regions both geographic and psychological. Other reviewers have more than adequately laid out the storyline and in that regard I have nothing to add. I will simply admonish readers that this is not a book for the queasy, the timid, or those of a markedly nervous disposition. That said, if you took pleasure from Oscar Wilde's The Portrait of Dorian Gray, J.K. Huysmans' A Rebours (Against Nature), or, stretching a bit, even the fantastical satire of The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, then this decadent, entertaining romp may be just what the "doctor" ordered. But you have been warned: I accept no responsibility for psychotic breaks triggered by this gruesome literary morsel.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
The Lying Beauty Within the Deep Ugliness of Human Perception 20 Sept. 2009
By Christopher Strang - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It is obvious that this book is one of Cendrars most ambtious novels. It is so well written that each minor and major shock create a seamless flow within a paradox of uncontrolled energies on one level - yet controlled energies on other levels - coupled with an almost invisible hatred of the human for the entire human condition. To me, it is the most frightening book I have every read. ALso, it is in the realm of the greatest of classics. I cannot help but wonder where or not Blaise Cendrars was or had been an avid reader of Balzac (This is based upon some of his structuring of the story).
13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
An underappreciated masterpiece for writers to enjoy 12 May 1998
By Chat6@aol.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a depraved and beautiful book that should be read by everyone. It is the literary equivalent of the best meal you've ever eaten to the point of sickness--you wouldn't want to do it every night but you don't want to die without ever having done it once. Everyone who cares about literature, especially the decadent literature of this century, should check this out.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Unfathomamble Brilliance!! 1 Oct. 2011
By Bailey Hicks - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This was the first book I read from Cendrars with little thought that he would have the humbling effect on me that he did. To say this book is great, is an understatement! After you've read it ,you too, will understand why! The amount of research that had to be applied to this book is an amazing feat in itself, let alone the whole storyline which is genius, complex,and poetic,... like all the great authors! Moravagine...A psychological thrilling novel that confronts bare human emotion with an honesty unmatched by few.. brings us closer into the mind of an author, whose awesome talent for expression, sent tremors down the spine of the literary world, showing us life's true nature...macabre and yet beautiful!
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Moravagine is modernity 12 Nov. 2008
By Ivan Turgenev - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Every time I read this there is a new layer of meaning that jumps out; from the adventure story examining the limits and constraints of human nature to Cendrars' brilliant digressions in which each one paragraph could be fodder for entire books. It will have you rethink what it means to be human.
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