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The Moor's Last Sigh Hardcover – Jan 1996

15 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 435 pages
  • Publisher: Pantheon Books; First Edition US edition (Jan. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679420495
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679420491
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 16.5 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,538,379 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sir Salman Rushdie is the author of many novels including Grimus, Midnight's Children, Shame, The Satanic Verses, The Moor's Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury and Shalimar the Clown. He has also published works of non-fiction including The Jaguar Smile, Imaginary Homelands, The Wizard of Oz and, as co-editor, The Vintage Book of Short Stories.

Product Description

Amazon Review

In The Moor's Last Sigh Salman Rushdie revisits some of the same ground he covered in his greatest novel, Midnight's Children. This book is narrated by Moraes Zogoiby, a.k.a. Moor, who speaks to us from a gravestone in Spain. Like Moor, Rushdie knows about a life spent in banishment from normal society--Rushdie because of the fatwa that followed The Satanic Verses, Moor because he ages at twice the rate of normal humans. Yet Moor's story of travail is bigger than Rushdie's; it encompasses a grand struggle between good and evil while Moor himself stands as allegory for Rushdie's home country of India. Filled with wordplay and ripe with humour, it is an epic work, and Rushdie has the tools to pull it off. He earned a 1995 Whitbread Prize for his efforts. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

"'A wonderful book' Independent on Sunday" "Salman Rushdie's greatest novel...held me in its thrall and provided the richest fictional experience of 1995" Sunday Times "Rushdie is still our most exhilaratingly inventive prose stylist, a writer of breathtaking originality" Financial Times "Endlessly inventive, witty, digressional and diverting" Observer

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Darren Kirk on 23 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
I've read several Rusdie books before over the years - Midnight's Children first, then the Ground Beneath Her Feet, and also Fury. Despite enjoying all three thoroughly (well, less so Fury, which disintegrates towards the end) I've never felt the compulsion that you get with some authors to read the entire oeuvre. A lot of people tell me that they find Rusdie hard to get into, and often give up in the first 100 pages. To do so is a great shame, as they will miss some wonderful story-telling, but I can understand their reasons - particularly with the Moor's Last Sigh. Initially, it feels a little too much like a re-hash of Midnight's children - the family saga told by the child who - as a result of the cirumstances of their birth - experiences life in a strange and unique manner. With Midnight's Children it was the special powers conferred on those born closest to the clock chime of India's independence, with Moor's Last Sigh it is the double-speed existence for our narrator - a 4 and 1/2 month pregnancy, and each year being two in his body's development.

Similarly, for the union of the grand parents in Midnight's Children (the bed sheet with holes through which, as young suitors, the grandfather slowly pieces together the appearance of the grandmother) we have, in Moor's Last Sigh, the first sexual encounter between mother and father on the spice sacks in a warehouse of the family business. On both occassions the metaphors involved stretch beyond breaking point. There is no denying that Rushdie is a wonderful writer, but at times in the Moor's Last Sigh, it tests the patience. There is meaning in every insignificant detail and thåt meanning is described playfully, and - frustratingly - at great length. It wears you down.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Malsingh on 6 July 2010
Format: Paperback
'The Moor's Last Sigh' follows the story of Moraes 'Moor' Zogoiby, as he tells the tumultuous history of his family and the series of chaotic events that have taken him from Bombay on a desperate quest to Spain. One of the main focuses of the story is his mother, a powerful figure and talented artist who painted a series of pictures of 'The Moor', a character inspired by family ancestry and also somewhat based on her son. Through a string of personal tragedies and national events, the Zogoiby family has been torn apart, and Moor seeks to show the reasons behind this to the reader, giving explanations that veer between the mundane and the magical.

The beauty of Rushdie's writing is the way that he describes things in just the right level of detail (intricate enough to paint the scene perfectly, whilst not bogging the reader down), connects the comparatively small personal events in the lives of his character with what is going on in the world as a whole, and also his dark humour. Somehow he manages to make the characters in the book somewhat responsible or at least complicit in events that affect the whole of India or even the world. I also like the way in which the reader is never sure whether the highly unusual, even magical occurrences that Moor describes are supposed to be taken seriously, or if he is just using them as a way of justifying or excusing people's actions.

This is the second Salman Rushdie book I have read, the first being 'Midnight's Children'. My first impressions are that he certainly has a distinctive style, and that these two books are similar in tone, themes, and even share a couple of characters.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By judith on 20 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rushdie has an amazing English style . . . witty enough to make you think twice. This book is a hilariously funny account of growing up, which does feature Mumbai as a main character . . . and a complex plot behind how everyone got to Mumbai, a kind of comic epic. . . So, you laugh and laugh, and then you get to the end and it is painful and there is this kind of bitter aftertaste . . . In other words, the moral content of the narrative is presented in a way which makes you laugh and then makes you start to wonder how you missed the undertones . . . how does the wit and verve of the story-telling make us blind to some rather less pleasant things? Is this an example of how we can construct our own personal life-narratives to delude ourselves? . . . and other such serious philosophical questions . . . How does the "exoticism" of the tale take us outside of ourselves so that we can turn around and see what we have been blind to in ourselves? I am, at the moment, very intrigued by the construction of moral/practical arguments . . . and this book gives much sensuous pleasure in the process . . .
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Rush on 21 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rushdie's most best, and most accessible novel. First serious post-fatwa book, it shows a more cynical Rushdie, who is less of a firebrand, but still deeply committed.
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Format: Paperback
This was one of my earliest encounters with this allegedly difficult author. I found it beautifully poetic, wonderfully developed, skilfully atmospheric and totally engaging. I cannot understand why more people don't read his books. This is more approachable than Midnight's Children and I found it more enjoyable than The Satanic Verses, which I loved. If you enjoy Ian McEwan, Julian Barnes, even that master of pretensions, Martin Amis, then I would strongly recommend this. Great stuff.
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