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Moonwalk One - The Director's Cut [DVD]

Neil Armstrong , Buzz Aldrin , Theo Kamecke    Exempt   DVD
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
Price: 11.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Reviews

Product Description

Moonwalk One. Kamecke's film could be placed in a time capsule and removed some time in the distant future as an exact record of our feelings at the time. So said Kathleen Carroll of the New York Daily News in 1972. NASA commissioned director Theo Kamecke to make the documentary only six weeks before Apollo 11 s flight to the Moon in July 1969. But instead of a simple documentary film, what transpired was a philosophical and poetic record of Man s first attempt to walk on another world. Opening dramatically with another of mankind s great achievements Stonehenge the film puts the triumph of the Moon shot into its proper historical context. Filmed across the World as the mission unfolded, Moonwalk One uniquely captured the essence of Apollo 11 in a way that subsequent documentaries could only mimic. Combined with Charles Morrow s breathtaking, avant-garde score and Laurence Luckinbill s inspiring narration this is a classic film for all time and makes for fascinating viewing today from the perspective of the early 21st Century. As Joseph Gelmis of the New York daily Newsday declared in 1969; Moonwalk One deserves to be a companion piece to Stanley Kubrik s masterwork 2001: A Space Odyssey . The Restoration. Working closely with Theo, the producers have re-mastered his documentary classic for future generations to enjoy. Combining the only existing full-length 35mm print with recently restored NASA film shot by the astronauts themselves, they have created a vibrant new High Definition digital master of the movie. Together with a director s commentary, a host of extra features and a new 5.1 sound track, this is indeed the ultimate time capsule , recording the last year of the 1960s and the historic flight of Apollo 11.

Review

Theo Kamecke who directed the documentary MOONWALK ONE, said his intention was not merely to assemble a truly historical view of our species first attempt to touch another planet, but also to present a portrait of place and time and culture in which it happened. That s exactly what MOONWALK ONE is. Beginning 3000 years ago at Stonehenge, believed to be man s first observatory, the film leaps to Cape Kennedy getting ready for the moon launch. It is this kind of immense conceptual sweep that sets MOONWALK ONE far above all the other dozens of documentaries made on the subject and within that broad historical framework there is an extraordinary sense of fine detail. Indian peasants serenely looking at the dawn of the morning of the launch, there s some original ultra-slow motion film of the launch itself that turns the fiery blast into exquisitely beautiful abstractions. The awe reflected in the faces of he people in the trailer park at Cape Kennedy as they crane up to watch the fading rocket, and the documentary overwhelmingly captures the sense of paradox by contrasting all banal vulgarity that surrounded the noble impulse may have been mankind s first truly religious act. The commentary is sparse and simple. This is the first documentary worthy of the immensity of the moon launch itself and the first to take a truly global view and capture a sense of nostalgia for the planet we began to love only as we left it. The first to perceive the fusing of myth and history and science. Kevin Saunders ABC TV News November 1972 --Kevin Saunders, ABC TV News, November 1972

About the Director

Theo Kamecke born 1937 in New York City, and worked as a film director during the 1960s and 70s. Theo's best known film is Moonwalk One - a NASA commissioned documentary feature film to cover their Apollo 11 mission in the summer of 1969. Theo's other influential films included The Incredible Bread Machine Film, and To Be Alive, which he worked as a film editor on. Since the 1980s Theo has worked as a sculptor, working in the medium of early electronic circuits. His work has been bought by, amongst others, film director James Cameron. Theo lived for several years in Kansas, before his family relocated to the Boston area. He attended Tufts University, quitting after his second year because he felt the urge to hitch-hike around the country and discover life. Following this first road trip he settled in California and lived around Los Angeles for a couple of years before returning to Boston where he found work with a publisher near Harvard Square. This vocation held little interest for him however, and he had by now decided that he wanted to make films. So in 1962 he came to New York City which was then the center for non-theatrical film production. Kamecke s experience in the film world began only shortly before joining Francis Thompson and Alexander Hammid in New York City, to edit the multi-screen film To Be Alive! which became the hit of the 1964-65 New York World s Fair, and won the Academy Award for best short documentary. After editing another Francis Thompson multi-screen film for Expo 67 in Montreal, Kamecke set off on his own to direct other creative documentaries. In 1969 he was called back by Francis Thompson to take on the feature-length documentary for NASA about the Apollo 11 landing on the moon, which came to be called Moonwalk One . That film was shown at Cannes and was subsequently in the first program of New American Directors at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. In the years that followed, Theo Kamecke wrote, directed and filmed many documentary short films on subjects as varied as computers, coal mines and cowboys. He created a film projection for Jesus Christ Superstar , an award-winning three minute long television commercial for IBM, and the first program for the children s television series Big Blue Marble . Among his short films was the avant-garde and controversial The Incredible Bread Machine Film , for the World Research think tank in California (1974). His films had taken him to many parts of the world but by the 1980 s he was growing weary of a life revolving around schedules and meetings, and craved creativity on his own schedule. While still keeping an apartment in New York City, Kamecke had in the 1970 s bought a home in a very rural area in the northern Catskill Mountains. It became the depository for various things of visual interest which he had collected while making films. One day in the mid-80 s when an impulse to be creative struck, he looked at a pile of circuit-boards he had collected because of their graphic qualities, and began to build something. His first shows in New York City came a couple of years later. On his website are images and a more detailed description of his artwork. Theo Kamecke s circuitry sculpture is held in private, institutional and museum collections internationally.

Product Description

NASA commissioned director Theo Kamecke to make a feature documentaryfilm only six weeks before Apollo 11's flight to the Moon in July 1969. Instead of a simple documentary film, what Theo created was a philosophical and poetic record of Man's first attempt to walk on another world. Working closely with Theo, The Attic Room has re-mastered his documentary classic for future generations to enjoy. Combining the only existing full-length 35mm print with recently restored NASA flight film shot by the astronauts themselves, we have created a vibrant new High Definition digital master of the movie Moonwalk One. Together with a director's commentary, a host of extra features and a new 5.1 sound track, this is indeed the ultimate "time capsule", recording the last year of the 1960s and the historic flight of Apollo 11.
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