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A Monstrous Regiment of Women Hardcover – Large Print, 1 Dec 1998


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Hardcover, Large Print, 1 Dec 1998
£999.11 £35.00
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Ulverscroft Large Print Books Ltd; Large type edition edition (1 Dec. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0708940161
  • ISBN-13: 978-0708940167
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 14.6 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,991,693 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Crime fiction s most unlikely but utterly credible romance... Laurie King is the most interesting writer to emerge on the American crime fiction front in recent years

--Val McDermid

Brilliantly written

--T. J. Binyon, Evening Standard (of The Birth of a New Moon) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

In 'A Monstrous Regiment of Women', the riveting sequel to 'The Beekeeper's Apprentice', Mary Russell (able apprentice detective to the great but ageing Sherlock Holmes)is becoming a skilled sleuth in her own right.

After a tedious visit from relatives, Mary is looking for respite in London when she comes across a friend from Oxford. The young woman introduces Mary to her current enthusiasm, the strange and enigmatic Margery Childe, leader of 'The New Temple of God'. It appears to be a charismatic sect involved in the post-World War movement. One suffrage movement, with a feminist slant on Christianity. Intrigued and curious, Mary begins to wonder if the New Temple is a front for something more sinister.

When a series of murders claims members of the movement's wealthy young female volunteers and principal contributors, Mary, with Holmes in the background, starts to investigate, but events spiral out of control as the situation becomes even more desperate, and Mary's search plunges her into the worst danger she has yet faced…

'A Monstrous Regiment of Women' is a fascinating and beautifully observed novel from the award-winning writer Laurie King.

"One of the most literate and gifted writers the mystery world has seen for some time".
Val McDermid

"If there is a new P.D. James…I would put my money on Laurie King".
'Boston Globe'

'The Bee Keeper's Apprentice' by Laurie R. King

"A carnival of sheer delight…the novel builds to a rousing climax, riveting and suspenseful".
'Chicago Sun Times'

"A tantalising novel, both for the intelligence and charm of the flirtation as well as for the intrigue of the plot".
'San Francisco Chronicle'

"Delightful…King has created a fitting partner for the Great Detective".
'Publishers News'

"Worthy and welcome, with power to charm the most grizzled Baker Street Irregular".
'New York Daily News'

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Clarence T. Henry on 18 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
Mary Russell is more or less on her own in this second adventure. At the ripe age of 21, Mary comes into her inheritance and through a friend, is introduced to the New Temple of God and its mystical leader, Margery Childe. Her feminism and theology fascinate Mary, but when a series of murders claim the lives of some of the Temple's wealthy young women, Mary begins to suspect something more is afoot. With Holmes' aid, Mary confronts a cunning and vicious killer. Nevertheless, the mystery plot is really secondary to story of Mary's coming of age after the events in King's superb Beekeepers' Apprentice. Mary must come to grips not only with her academic aspirations, but her relationship with Holmes. I can't help but be enthralled with King's smart writing and the unique voice of Mary Russell. But what I like most is that King knows when to make her heroine take charge, without making her an unrealistic action hero.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. Stoneham on 28 Oct. 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is never going to win any literary awards, but I adored it. The characters were adorable, the plot is pacey and interesting, and the scene at the end makes all the tension between the two main characters, Holmes and Russell, utterly worth the wait. I recommend this book to anyone who likes a mystery, a bit of Victorian society stuff, and of course a little bit of romance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By saltor on 27 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback
I am hooked on the Mary Russell series and currently borrowing them all in sequence from the library. King is an American author who (mostly) gets 1920s England right. The dialogue is great and I find the maturing of Holmes believable. The concept of his mentoring an intelligent, independent young woman was a good one and the stories exciting. The mutual attraction of the characters is at last made manifest at the climax of this story. Some have found this off-putting but I enjoyed it.

However, I couldn't understand why Holmes simply accepted Russell's account of the 'healing' without question. This was out of character. I noted and enjoyed Holmes's criticism of Doyle's belief in the fairy photographs. Presumably King put these two events into the same novel purposely, to let us know that she herself believes that inexplicable things can happen, as long as they are to do with God! After all the stress on logical methods to solve problems, this is worrying. That said, I loved all the stuff about the mistranslations in scripture to oppress women.

The plot does wrong-foot you a bit because of the doubts over the motives of the mystic. The author is challenging how strong a feminist you are! In the end there is a good, old-fashioned villain.

Drug abuse is also dealt with in this book - it's as if the author is getting a lot of stuff out of her system before she can begin the series proper, with the two characters as equals. Poor Mary has gone through a lot of physical torment already and this is only Book Two! She deserves some marital consolation with Sherlock.

I loved the 'Q' references [James Bond]. Overall, an exciting book and made me want to continue reading the series.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By snowqueen01 on 26 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've always loved the Holmes books, and this series is a great take on how things might have been several decades after his prime. I also like the fact that there is a feminine viewpoint to empathise with. Holmes fanatics may not approve, but I think the author has done a great job of reimagining the great detective with a female sidekick - Holmes is still all-knowing and a great teacher, but Mary really comes of age in this one. And I like the questioning of her feelings towards Holmes - their relationship is important but never detracts from the plot. Looking forward to the next.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By gwenalop on 30 April 2012
Format: Paperback
Time has moved on from the previous book by two years and Mary Russell is nearly 21 and this time the novel focuses very strongly on Russell. She has left Holmes behind to a certain extent caught up in her own academic life and career. She is counting down the days till she turns 21 and recives her inheritance, and she starts detecting on her own, with Holmes as more of a background character - at least for the first half of the book. Whilst this lack of Holmes at first annoyed me, it was a useful tool to see how much Russell had changed and developed on her own. She takes all the lessons Holmes has shown her and applies them to helping her friend Veronica who is involved with a community church and the poor of London. But recently several members of the church group have died in dubious circumstances. It gives a good portrait of London life in 1920 and the changes after the war. Again this book follows the first novel in being written as a journal of Russell, but once again there was a slightly predicatble ending - not to the case, which kept you intrigued throughout, but in Russells private life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Forbes on 31 Dec. 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This is Laurie R King's second Mary Russell book- a great followup to The Beekeeper's Apprentice wherein we are introduced to Mary and re-kindle our acquaintance with Sherlock Holmes.
I started rather at the wrong end of the series- picking up The Language of Bees in Kirkwall Library- because the story involves Russell and Holmes making a visit to the Standing Stones at Stenness. So I have had the infinite pleasure of filling in the gaps as the books arrived by post, to my Kindle and via Audible ( Jenny Sterling is an excellent narrator) to my Pod.

I am addicted and I'm not sure whether I want to be Mary Russell because she is such a wonderful female or because she is so fortunate as to be involved with Sherlock Holmes.
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