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Monster

Monster

30 Sep 2010

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan 1994
  • Release Date: 1 Jan 1994
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 1994 R.E.M./Athens Ltd.,
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 49:10
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001F375MW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,238 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Steve on 10 Dec 2006
Format: Audio CD
A lot of nonsense is talked about this album, generally of the order that it's a disappointment after Automatic and Out of Time. Wrong! This album is a corker from start to finish- there's hardly a bad song here. Just because Bucky has ditched the mandolins and turned up his amp doesnt mean that these aren't very well-crafted (and well-produced) songs. In fact, its worth noting that album sounds fantastic- although you may be forgiven for thinking that its an album of murky sludge, nothing could be further from the truth. Despite Buck's heavily delayed, feedback-soaked riffs, the sound is perfectly balanced, with drums, bass and vocals all present and correct, giving the album one heck of a punch.

So, in terms of songs, what do we have here? Well, What's the Freqency Kenneth is a cracking opener (with its lead guitar solo played backwards), while Crush With Eyeliner and I Took Your Name are swaggering alt-rock beauties with an impeccably sleazy groove. Let Me In is a beautiful tribute to Kurt Cobain, a sparse arrangement with Stipe's vocal set against guitars which sound like they could strip wallpaper. Circus Envy is a blast, with a great tune and yet more fabulous guitar distortion. But its not all amps-turned-up-to-ten RA-W-WK. Tongue is a beautiful ballad sung in a falsetto, while the single Bang and Blame is more conventional REM rock, but its every bit as good as an REM single should be. Strange Currencies is the (arguably superior) counterpart to Everybody Hurts. Perhaps Star 69, with its sloppy punk riff, is the album's only low-point.

Although Monster can't match up to Automatic (what album could?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Mar 2002
Format: Audio CD
A seemingly much unloved record judging by some of the reviews in the press at the time.....
In reality a stunningly original effort, that went against the sound of the time...... certainly more glam and glitzy than grunge..... this found R.E.M. at a complete counter point to the album 'Automatic For The People' that proceeded it........
The best songs, well 'Let Me In' is gobsmacking!! Mike Mills taking over the guitar from Peter Buck, in what amounts to a sonic guitar wash... against stipes volatile but gorgeous lyrics..... simply a stunning song that sounds nothing like R.E.M.........
The following song 'Circus Envy' sounds like R.E.M. doing Nirvana, and is certainly one of R.E.M.'s heaviest ever........ I love this song!!
Other's that stand out, the trashed!! 'You' (reminds me of Oddfellows Local 151 from Document) deserves more mentions than it ever gets, as does 'I Took Your Name.'........ the gloriously Glammed up, and Sonic Youth inspired (with Sonic's Thurston Moore on backing vocals) Crush With Eyeliner is superb and finds R.E.M. in down and dirty mode......
Lower points..... well, 'What's the frequency Kenneth' sounds too restrained...... except for a fantastic solo, played backwards....... and the reggae beats inspried 'Bang and Blame' not really hitting the right notes in my head......
I love it for what it is though.............
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Sep 2004
Format: Audio CD
I listened to this album for the first time with trepidation as I was a big fan of 'Out Of time' and 'Automatic for the People', But I have to admit that I love it. It's nice to sometimes hear something new from a band who are not willing just to stick to the same, popular path but to tread new ground. The opening track had me thinking initially 'What's it all about?' Now I know the story is about a friend of the Band who was beaten up in the street, by complete strangers, who seemed to think he was someone else. Leaving him bleeding on the ground , one of them asked him 'What's the frequency, Kenneth?'. I love this track but have to admit that my favourite song is 'Bang and Blame'. From the intro to the fade-out, it washes over you like a little piece of perfection. I think the album has an even quality, no weak tracks although King of Comedy is not one of my favourites. I prefer the tracks which are full of emotion and which move me. Despite the rise in noise level, there is plenty of emotion on this album. I wouldn't urge anyone to buy this as it is so different from most of REM's other stuff. It's raw and anything but safe. But if you are the sort of person who dosen't get upset when Bands you like stray from a tried and tested formular, then risk it. I did and I'm glad I did.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andy Sweeney TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 Sep 2007
Format: Audio CD
Of course, I could be completely predictable and recommend the stunning and near perfect pieces of work in R.E.M.'s catalogue, Automatic For The People and Out Of Time, but where would my sense of wanting to spread the word and share the lesser masterpieces be? Monster is one of those greats which somehow slipped under the critical radar which, considering the content, is almost puzzling.

The question, of course, is "If it's so damn good, why isn't it more popular?" and the answer is that it was a question of expectation and timing. Stipe, Mills, Buck & Berry had just made arguably two of the most perfect, gentle, delicate and beautiful albums ever committed to shiny silver disc, so perhaps the world wasn't quite expecting or receptive to a full-on, bombastic guitar rock album. Personally, I'd say that was the world's problem and no reflection upon an album absolutely crammed full of brilliant, raw songs. Out go the Byrds influences and in come sounds that Neil Young, Kyuss and Nirvana would have been proud to release.

Thing is, the melodies and the majesty of the previous albums were still there, just slightly hidden behind fuzzy guitars, ambitious solos and a carefree abandon of the patented R.E.M. sound. There were some people horrified because Mr. Buck threw the mandolin in the trash and cranked his guitar up to 11, but I'm sure that those people probably only owned two R.E.M. albums anyway otherwise the fact that this group weren't afraid to re-invent themselves shouldn't have come as a shock at all.

The first three tracks are all classics. What's The Frequency, Kenneth, is the perfect album opener.
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