£18.95 + £1.26 shipping
In stock. Sold by makandmabel

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£18.95
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: EliteDigital UK
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.49

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Monkey - Journey To The West [Australian Import]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Monkey - Journey To The West [Australian Import]


Price: £18.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by makandmabel.
3 new from £18.95 5 used from £2.90
£18.95 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by makandmabel.

Amazon Artist Stores

All the music, full streaming songs, photos, videos, biographies, discussions, and more.
.

Frequently Bought Together

Monkey - Journey To The West [Australian Import] + Dr Dee + Everyday Robots
Price For All Three: £28.77

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (25 Aug. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Hn
  • ASIN: B001EDKZUM
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 710,065 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Product Description

MONKEY Journey To The West (2008 Taiwanese issue 22-track CD album - Created by the team behind Gorillaz [Jamie Hewlett & Damon Albarn] Journey To The West was recorded in London & Beijing over the last year and features lyrics based on ancient Chinese text performed by European & Chinese musicians and singers. The album opens with Monkeys World and into a Heavenly Peach Banquet escorted by Monkey Bee and closes with the Disappearing Volcano housed in the glossy digipak sleeve with lyric booklet)

BBC Review

Anyone who was convinced that this was the year of the rat must, by now, be realising that, in fact, the animal that's making 2008 its own is the monkey. In 2007, Damon Albarn and graphic artist pal, Jamie Hewlett - the men behind Gorillaz - premiered their latest outside-the-box project: Monkey: Journey To The West, and it's been wowing the critics ever since. Combining Hewlett's distinctive comic-book style, circus acrobatics and Mandarin Operatics, it's amazingly reaching out to folk for whom even Gilbert and Sullivan is a stretch. But how does the soundtrack fare without the astounding visuals?

Everyone who has seen the two-minute animated ident for the BBC's Olympic coverage will have a pretty good idea what to expect: Bubbly analogue synth arpeggios, angelic Chinese vocals and a whole plethora of Eastern instrumentation combined with Western dance tropes. Pretty much like Albarn's other recent project, The Good The Bad And The Queen, this audacious mixture may look unlikely on paper, but in the flesh it makes for a delightfully offbeam delight. The mixture veers widely from Cantonese pop via totalitarian overkill (The Dragon King, March Of The Iron Army) to electronica (Monkey Bee) and dissonant musique concrete (Tripitaka's Curse). True enough, every once in a while Damon's older work pops up, as on the Gorillaz-like O Mi To Fu, but, surprisingly, some of the most successful stuff here is the straight ahead, brass-led classical work like The White Skeleton Demon or the closing Disappearing Volcano. It seems Albarn really is a proper musician.

Only on rare occasions do you get the feeling that the duo are cultural tourists. One suspects that Heavenly Peach Banquet was dredged from Albarn's boyhood TV habits watching The Water Margin (a great fantasy kung fu serial whose theme tune was equally sweetly naff). And Battle In Heaven's mesmerically repeated string loops that slowly lapse into nightmarish dissonance recreate the wobbly degradation of a worn out kung fu film soundtrack.

What is odd is considering just how widely bought this oddity will be. One suspects that about 50 percent on offer will not prove to be on the majority's repeat playlists. But Monkey represents a really intelligent and successful attempt to fuse East and West in new ways. And for that alone it is a triumph. --Chris Jones

Find more music at the BBC This link will take you off Amazon in a new window

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Demob Happy on 11 Sept. 2008
Format: Audio CD
I have been a keen advoate of all things Damon Albarn post-Graham Coxon (i.e., Blur's `Think Tank` and beyond) so was understandably quite excited by the album release of `Monkey, Journey to the West`. I had not seen the Chinese opera-spectacular which this album scores but I didn't let that dissuade me from pre-ordering this one from Amazon. What I hadn't realised was that this 22-song collection largely comprises incidental compositions from the opera and doesn't stand up as an album in its own right. Unless you have seen the opera - in which case this might make a compelling souvenir - I feel duty-bound to warn you not to expect something on the scale of other Albarn side-projects such as Gorillaz' `Demon Days`, `Mali Music` or `The Good, the Bad and the Queen`.

There are handfull of lovely individual songs - particularly the Himalayan Kate Bushisms of `Heavenly Peach Blanket' - but the majority are sonic doodles of varying interest. Predominantly comprising synths and drum machines, fleshed out with guitar, harp and strings, some are diverting enough - even narrational - in their own right, but most score some unseen action intelligable only to those who have seen the production. The effect is sometimes frustratingly akin to being stuck in a theatre foyer ticketless while the action gets underway without you in the audience. And unlike a traditional opera, the music seems rather secondary - or at least only complementary to - the action on stage, rather than the other way around. As a souvenir, it's an attractive package, but I've never been a fan of Jamie Hewlett's artwork - Gorillaz for me was always just about the music.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Johnniosity on 22 Aug. 2008
Format: Audio CD
What a gem of an album this is!

I haven't seen the show so on the music and music alone, I have to say that there are some genuinely beautiful moments on this album.
As for the so-called 'difficult' pieces, I agree these will not be everyone's cup of tea but I think many people, myself included, see them as curious little moments that demand re-listening to get your head around.

I like music that isn't just ear candy and actually has some substance and Damon has really achieved something here. Something that is totally different (thank God!) from everything else out there at the moment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lucy W on 30 Nov. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Back ground music this is not! This album is full of extraordinary sounds and feelings that are powerful and strange. It is impossible to listen to this as background music, but if you enjoy music for the range of emotions and physical experiences it evokes you will love this album. Yes, there is the trademark Albarn waltz underlying "I love Buddha", and the more westernised tracks tend to be underpinned by thumping Gorillaz baselines, but this album is as strange and different as it should be. There is no English, but Mandarin, many of the instruments are strange, and the melodies are rooted in Chinese folk traditions. You will either find this album wierd and inaccessible, or utterly exhilerating. Deserves to be listened to properly and loudly!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Captain Pugwash on 26 May 2009
Format: Audio CD
Everyone who saw the two-minute animated ident for the BBC's Olympic coverage last year will have a pretty good idea what to expect from this soundtrack to Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett's epic East meets West operetta. Bubbly synthesizers, sweet Chinese vocals and various kinds of Eastern instrumentation are supplemented by more familiar dance sensibilities. I was relieved to find that despite being removed from the context of the operetta, this collection of songs still worked for me.

As with Albarn's other recent project, The Good The Bad And The Queen, this ambitious collation may sound unworkable in practice, but actually makes for a fascinating if off-kilter delight.
The mixture veers widely from the pure Cantonese pop of tracks such as `The Dragon King', to electronica `Monkey Bee, `Monkey's World', and more unusual offerings such as `Iron Rod' and `Whisper'. We occasionally see glimpses of the more recognizable in tracks like `O Mi To Fu', but, surprisingly, some of the most successful creations here are the less ambitious but musically sound stuff like `The White Skeleton Demon' or ` Disappearing Volcano'.

Ultimately Albarn's latest offering represents a brave and mainly successful attempt to fuse East and West by pushing the boundaries of music; not content with being the face and the driving force of on of the 90s most successful and musically accomplished pop bands, Damon seems determined to move into as many disparate musical areas as he has time for, and on this showing I am fascinated to see what he will come up with next.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Pearce on 3 Sept. 2008
Format: Audio CD
is this any good, yes. would it be any good without damon albarns name on it? yes but surely wouldn't make the light of day on western charts. its a great opeara score and the good thing is even without having seen the show, its easy to imagine how track names complement the music.. worth buying, still undecided.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By sininho on 3 Sept. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Just received the album this morning, and on the first listen I am taken to a different world of sounds, which spark so many emotions. I feel as if I am traveling with monkey and his pals.

I haven't seen the opera, but this certainly gives me a private peek into how this amazing project came together!!! Good work boys!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback