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Money: Vintage 21 (Vintage 21st Anniv Editions) Paperback – 4 Aug 2011

78 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (4 Aug. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099563029
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099563020
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,002,429 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Martin Amis is the author of ten novels, the memoir Experience, two collections of stories and six collections of non-fiction. He lives in London.

Product Description

Review

"His eloquently rendered inner life shows a richness and tenderness" (The Week)

Book Description

A special celebratory edition to mark the 21st birthday of Vintage books.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

77 of 81 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Feb. 2000
Format: Paperback
Amis gets a bad press, and you can see why. Why is a middle class novelist from London writing in this smart-ass cool American jargon? Why is he so clearly in love with this disposable cynical money grabbing pornographic transatlantic culture that this book is rubbishing? I started the book in this mode of thought, ready to hate it. But the language and the rhythm and the wit are so brilliant, and so energetic, that I was completely won over after 50 pages or so. This is a Hogarthian world of exploitation and indulgence. John Self tries to get on the gravy train but ends up being shafted himself.
The book is also very, very funny. The scenes when John explains to the young Hollywood brat pack movie actor Spunk Davis that it might be helpful for the British market if he changed his first name, and when a prostitute asks him if he is very excited at the impending Diana and Charles wedding had me laughing out loud.
I even forgive his having John meet a dull British novelist, one Martin Amis, in a café and signing him up as screenwriter.
Sure it is self consciously clever. But I would rather have the brilliance that is here than not at all. And it is good to read a serious book that is actually dealing directly with our times rather than some time in the past (like most of the contemporary novels I read).
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Dead Celeb on 12 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
I have mixed feelings about this book. Despite containing some moments of the wit and satire that Amis seems to be able to dash off so easily, it never feels like it totally justifies the price of admission.

Like the central character John Self, the prose feels bloated at 368 pages long. There's a kind of rhythm in the repetition of the constant acts of gluttony, depravity and violence of Self that I suppose you could argue form the basis of the satire. The problem I have with this is that if this book is intended as a satire, it doesn't feel like the aim is precise enough- it's more of a scattergun approach in which all of the targets receive a blast of Amis's caustic style.

What this leaves you with is a fairly stretched story full of unlikable characters (although I did enjoy John Self's dead pan reflections and utter lack of regret on events that would horrify most of us- being thrown out of bars, losing fights, throwing up in front of important people) interspersed with some genuinely funny moments.

It comes down to personal taste, as I know there are plenty of people who rate this book, but ultimately I found it comes off like an overlong speech by a very witty, though very drunk friend.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dave Gilmour's cat on 27 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
Martin Amis has never written better than he did in Money. This is his masterpiece. It's a savagely funny piece of satire that works on countless levels. The author's grasp of language is so subtle and masterful that it makes other writers' gifts look very basic indeed. This novel is good enough to change the way you see the world, from the central role of money in our lives (it's even more relevant since the global recession), to what you call your car (John Self's is a Fiasco) or your haircut (a rug re-think). Amis doesn't just show off with his dazzling prose. Instead, he rips into the sham that is the US film industry and the human tendency to use wealth to insulate ourselves from feelings. He also makes us examine how fiction works (there's a character called 'Martin Amis') and - without giving away the plot - gets deep into what makes up our identity, and, on a wider level, the Human Condition.

It's a great piece of work: funny, sad, horrifying and incredibly illuminating.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "pavano" on 12 July 2004
Format: Paperback
"I have measured out my life in coffee spoons" is a quotation from T.S Eliot. For me: substitute readings of this modern classic for spoons. I think that it was described as the best literary account of the 80s, and I would definitely agree. It is difficult to add to the eloquent appraisals of this book by other reviewers.
"Success" comes closest to it, in terms of comic perspective on class and society; and, re-reading the latter a few weeks ago, it seems obvious that it was the run-up to "Money." There is so much that makes me laugh, with repeated readings. The idiotic American who thinks that "Pericles: Prince Of Tyre" is about an automobile business is one that I always remember.
I don't think that Amis will ever write a novel (he can still pull it off with essays and short stories) as great as this.
At least two of his novels have been bungled as screen adaptations. "London Fields" is reportedly being worked on (promising, as Cronenburg is the director, and he created the atmosphere for "Spider" excellently), but his should not be attempted.
Like a comet, it will fly into my orbit for another re-reading within months or years.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Room for a View VINE VOICE on 11 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
Amis's punchy narrative, infused with colloquial wordplay and urban street talk, complements his hero's (the intriguingly named John Self) socially schizophrenic lifestyle. Self is launched into the money rich pseudo reality of the film industry bumping backwards and forwards between the pub based childhood memories of his London origins and a New York fantasy world of strip joints and intoxication. I found the author's style highly engaging, packed with comic material (fruit machine rage, junk food diets, Martin Amis) and themes of a dark cynical nature. I enjoyed the historical backdrop: allusions to the wedding of Prince Charles and Diana in contrast to news of serious rioting in London. The characters inhabiting both urban settings are hilarious, scheming, self-indulgent egotists and caricatures of attention seeking celebrity, society's misfits and money obsessed grifters. And how I laughed! I had to put the book down on several occasions due to passages such as the one describing Self's driving paranoia. This was the first Amis I had read and it took me a few pages to get on the right `wavelength' and enjoy the rhythm of Amis's literary style. For Self the status and prestige bought by money and the blinkered desire to have money are shown to be a destructive cycle of self inflicted physical and mental abuse, sexploitation and violence. I don't think Self is a nice person but his story is deeply funny.
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