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Money For Nothing: Real Wealth, Financial Fantasies and The Economy of the Future Paperback – 13 Oct 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Nicholas Brealey Publishing (13 Oct 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857882830
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857882834
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 15.2 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,064,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Aimed at the general reader as much as the devotees of the dismal science, this is a thoroughly enjoyable read." -- John Plender, Financial Times

"There is much of value in this book. evident in recent years.Few readers will finish without being stimulated and provoked." -- Philip Coggan, Financial Times

About the Author

Roger Bootle is one of the the world's best-known economists. Formerly Group Chief Economist at HSBC, he is now Managing Director of Capital Economics, an independent economic consultancy and Economic Advisor to Deloitte & Touche.He is a regular columnist on The Sunday Telegraph and a wellknown broadcaster on radio and television.

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Paul M. Clark on 10 Aug 2006
Format: Paperback
I have developed a lot of respect for Roger Bootle over the last few years as he is one of the only people that I have heard talk any sense with regard to the property market. I was also aware of his previous book, 'The Death of Inflation', which was derided by the consensus when published, and is now heralded as prophetic.

Here he takes a very wide look at the world's current and future economic position. He does this brilliantly. The book is well structured, entertaining and you do not need an economics degree to benefit from it. His arguments are well put together and highly convincing, so much so that by the end of the book you forget that he has been only talking about his predictions not facts.

It is also the first book I have read that tackles the economic dichotomy we presently face. On the one hand there are massive imbalances in the economy; record debt levels, trade deficits and asset bubbles. And on the other hand, an enormous opportunity presented by technology and globalisation. His conclusion is basically that things are going to be very rough in the short term, but the long term will bring 'superabundance' for us all.

Mr Bootle goes against the crowd again in this book and I am sure he will attract a lot of criticism. If the experience of his last book is repeated, those same people will be lauding his views as self evident in a few years time.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rolf Dobelli TOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Sep 2005
Format: Hardcover
A decade ago, economist Roger Bootle won respect for correctly predicting a long period of low inflation. In this wide-ranging look at the world economy, Bootle trades on that credibility to explain the origins of the dot-com bubble and to argue that the economy is in the midst of a housing bubble. He makes the convincing argument that stock-market gains are often little more than ephemera and he explores the idea of a knowledge-based economy. Bullish readers will be put off by Bootle's gloom and doom. Deflation has yet to occur, and the housing bubble he harps on has yet to burst in the time span since this work's publication. Still, we recommend this intriguing title to investors interested in a contrarian view of the markets and the economy.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Steiner on 29 April 2005
Format: Hardcover
Publisher: Nicholas Brealey Publishing (2003), ISBN: 1857882822
"Money for Nothing" is a somewhat controversial book written by the (London) City economist Roger Bootle. The author is a well known doomsayer who regularly hits the headlines with predictions of impending deflation and housing price crashes, never mind stock market crashes.
I've never taken seriously any economist spouting opinions on the real estate market (always dramatic, always wrong - witness the numerous press articles and parroting real estate agents), let alone about deflation. However, I've gradually become more concerned about deflation occurring in Europe and wanted to find out more about this dire economic condition and the remedial micro and macro action. I was hoping Bootle's book would offer an introduction to the topic. It did not disappoint.
Bootle's starting point is that we are at the edge of the abyss. Inflation has shrivelled to a mere shadow of its former self, or at least a shadow of the ogre central bankers and the economic press still hold it to be, and Japan has been long mired in deflation. The latest assessment of the Japanese central bank (April 2005) suggests this will continue until at least 2007. Germany is, possibly, not far off.
An economic collapse of Western Europe is therefore no longer unthinkable. Indeed, it could be a consequence of the Dollar, Yen and Yuan dropping against the Euro as a consequence of the current imbalances in trade accounts. The resulting breakdown in (European) competitiveness could lead to calamities such as housing price crashes, stock market crashes and deflation.
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