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A Momentary Lapse Of Reason (2011 Remastered Version)
 
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A Momentary Lapse Of Reason (2011 Remastered Version)

26 Sept. 2011 | Format: MP3

£6.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £8.49 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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30
1
4:21
30
2
4:52
30
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6:03
30
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5:08
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5:41
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6:12
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1:13
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1:45
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6:15
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0:39
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11
8:44

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 26 Sept. 2011
  • Release Date: 26 Sept. 2011
  • Label: EMI UK
  • Copyright: 2011 Pink Floyd (1987) Ltd under exclusive licence to Parlophone Records Ltd, a Warner Music Group Company
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 50:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B005NNZJW8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (106 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,097 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mr. T. F. Norton on 5 Nov. 2012
Format: Audio CD
I'm well aware that AMLOR and The Final Cut (2011 - Remaster) polarise the opinions of many Pink Floyd fans. For me, neither are classic Floyd. But then, both are still Pink Floyd and so therefore both (in their own ways) are a cut above most other bands' efforts.

Musically, this album has "80s sound" stamped all over it. Some of it can creep into cheesy-feel, but I've always thought that is a product of its time rather than the music itself. Suffice to say there are more than enough highs in this album (Signs of Life, Learning to Fly, One Slip, On the Turning Away, Sorrow) to make it an album worth buying. The stinkers (Dogs of War, A New Machine [either part], Terminal Frost), well, just gloss over these. Yet Another Movie is somewhere in between: I've always thought it sounded a bit lifeless on the album, but live it takes on a whole new feel.

Overall, AMLOR sounds like what it was: Gilmour fighting tooth and nail to get Floyd back up and running. As with any Pink Floyd album, you can rely on him providing some great guitar work and some kiss-ass solos, but the album lacks the finesse Rick Wright brought, or the heart Roger Waters lyrics added to previous numbers. (I would also add that in the comparison to The Final Cut, TFC also lacked Wright's finesse and Gilmour's musically superior skills too.)

Finally, with regards to the remastering effort: this is the 3rd copy of the album I've owned, and it is comfortably the best sounding version to date. As with other Floyd remastering efforts, the overall sound is much cleaner, much crisper, and overall much more life-like. For those of you who already own the album (and like it!), I'd suggest it's probably worth getting hold of.
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57 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Feb. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Whatever you think of Roger Waters, Pink Floyd was clearly never the same after his rather acrimonious exit. Having won the right to continue using the band's name, David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright recorded and released A Momentary Lapse of Reason in 1987. It's a far cry from the incredibly successful concept albums largely controlled by Roger Waters (e.g., The Wall, Dark Side of the Moon), and it has its inherent imperfections, but A Momentary Lapse of Reason is still an impressive album featuring some great musical moments and awesome Gilmour guitar riffs.
Freed from the controlling influences of Waters, David Gilmour dominates this album - he wrote or co-wrote every track, took up the mantle of lead singer, and did much to prove himself the greatest guitarist in the business. One can read certain things in the album title and some of the songs (e.g., Sorrow) about the whole Pink Floyd turmoil of the previous years, but the main problem with this album is its seeming lack of a unifying theme. There is unquestionably a great deal of intensity in the words and music, but there's no real depth. To me, the whole album has an artificial feel to it - especially compared with the Waters-dominated Pink Floyd releases. There are no bad songs on this album (although some Pink Floyd fans don't think very much of The Dogs of War), but few seem to work up any real emotion. One can get a feel for this in the opening instrumental track; there may be Signs of Life in the initial sounds of plodding movement through water, but these are lost in a cacophony of artificial voices speaking unintelligibly in the background. I have to admit that I don't always understand what Gilmour and the guys are trying to do in some of these songs.
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Format: Audio CD
As a fan of Floyd since the beginning, I take issue with some of the other reviewers of Floyd albums, who seem to criticise various tracks that I actually like and find virtue in the increasingly dismal stance taken by Rogers Waters last efforts. I always thought that like the Beatles 'White album' that Floyd's 'The Wall' could have made a good SINGLE album if the weaker fillers were left out. (OK I know that The Wall was a concept album and tells a story but some of the tracks are not as strong as others). After the bleakness of The Wall and Animals and Final Cut I thought Gilmour at the helm brought Floyd back to form. Both 'Momentary Lapse' and 'The Division Bell' are excellent and consistent albums, good throughout, and I think The Dogs of War is an excellent powerful track. Its all subjective innit?
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58 of 68 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Nov. 2001
Format: Audio CD
It is now 1987 and Pink Floyd have been dormant for four years. We fans had read countless articles from the music press over that period of time saying that Floyd were dead. Roger Waters had seemed to have won the cold war as his 'Pros & Cons Of Hitchhiking' album had been released and he had toured America and Europe with playing Floyd songs to boot. God was on his side, literally because his new lead guitarist was God (Eric Clapton just in case you didn't know his nickname). But just when we had given up hope of seeing the brand name, Pink Floyd on any new product A Momentary Lapse Of Reason is released.
Hang on a moment, we had had no Floyd for years then all of a sudden we have more activity than something which is very active. Roger was following his own dream world with Pros & Cons, diverging from his bleak melancholy state and to venture into something quite unusual. Now here was Gilmour and Mason with Wright in toe proving that they equally had a right to the name Pink Floyd. The legal battles continued but us fans didn't care, we had Waters and Floyd.
OK, with Waters now out of the main picture, the Floyd could continue true to what fans would expect of Gilmour/Mason/Wright: great music. First and foremost was the great music. This was there first true musical adventure since Wish You Were Here (1975). What did surprise a lot of people was Gilmour's lyrics. It was like a reincarnation of Waters. They were sad (One Slip: about an unwanted pregnancy), untrusting (Dogs Of War) and cold (Sorrow). Gilmour admitted that some of Roger had worn off on him. Thanks Roger. Could us fans love a too happy Floyd, I don't think so.
This album to me sounds like a more joyful version of Animals (without Wright's superb piano) crossed with the moodiness of Wish You Were Here.
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