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Moeran: Cello Concerto - Serenade
 
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Moeran: Cello Concerto - Serenade

2 April 2013 | Format: MP3

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11:14
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7:05
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10:20
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3:37
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2:44
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2:59
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2:25
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3:18
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2:00
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4:33
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1:14
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8:01
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5:00


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 2 April 2013
  • Label: Naxos
  • Copyright: (C) 2013 Naxos
  • Total Length: 1:04:30
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00BXEOIDW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 32,647 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jake on 13 May 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Compared to other British Cello Concertos (Elgar, Walton, Britten etc.) the Moeran is virtually unknown. However it is easily one of the loveliest and most accessible works written for the Cello that I've come across and it really deserves far more attention than it receives. Guy Johnston's account of this concerto is just superb! He never overdoes it yet at the same time he captures the atmosphere of the work perfectly and at given moments really pulls at the heart-strings! For any Guy Johnston fan and/or for anyone with a taste for music by British composers from the earlier half of the 20th century, this CD is a must-have! Wonderful music, winningly played by both soloist and orchestra, beautifully clean & clear recording - what's not to like?!
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By JB TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 April 2013
Format: Audio CD
This is an all to rare opportunity to hear a disc of Ernest Moeran's orchestral pieces, not only the cello concerto of 1945, but three shorter works, the Serenade, Lonely Waters and Whythorne's Shadow.

Moeran's music is reflective of his upbringing in Norfolk and of his Anglo-Irish background, a certain folk influence melting into a spare pastoral tranquility. Moeran's close friendship with Philip Heseltine - Peter Warlock - is evident, both in Whythorne's Shadow (based on a re-discovery by Heseltine of a madrigal by the Elizabethan composer Thomas Whythorne), and in the Serenade, which with its Elizabethan references is reminiscent of the Capriol Suite.

In the Adagio of the concerto particularly, it's hard not to think of Moeran's First World War experiences (he was badly injured on the Western Front), but this is far from heart-on-the-sleeve stuff; on the contrary, the transparency of the orchestration leads to a kind of pellucid beauty, and it's all the more affecting for that.

Guy Johnston's performance seems definitive; this is a reading of the utmost sensitivity, and he's sympathetically supported by the Ulster Orchestra and JoAnn Falletta.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By R. C. Ross on 5 April 2013
Format: Audio CD
This is an attractively presented disc. The cover photograph is beautiful, no doubt chosen to convey something of the mood of the performance of the cello concerto - generally hazy, understated, mellow and withdrawn.

Certainly these are the misty qualities that this subtle performance most represents. There is a melancholy air to the concerto in particular, eased a little in the third movement - which however concludes in this recording with as blatant a plea for audience applause as is to be found anywhere, a coda that seems somewhat schizophrenic given the mood projected by the entire preceding 27 minutes!

I've no doubt that this concerto has a haunting beauty often conveyed in the context of a hushed atmosphere. But there is more to the work than seems to have been discovered in this often uncharacterised performance. There seems a deliberate reluctance to project the music's other moods and phases. Although the cello 'sings' through the entire work, the melodies are almost hinted at rather than memorably articulated. The other great recording, by Raphael Wallfisch and his deeply perceptive partner Norman Del Mar, glows with soft colours and an intensity that seems altogether missing in this recent issue. It is significant that with Del Mar the third movement coda feels to be a grand summation of all that has preceeded, rather than a disconnected moment of excited freedom.

But no doubt the Naxos disc is well worth hearing - but I'm not sure if I'd reach for it very often in preference to the alternative mentioned above. Or maybe I will! To try and discover what I may be missing as I listen to its whispered utterances.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. Greenbank on 9 April 2013
Format: Audio CD
Ernest John Moeran was born in 1894, and brought up in Norfolk. He was of Anglo-Irish descent, the son of an Irish clergyman and English mother. He studied violin and piano as a child. Attending Uppingham public school, he later went to the Royal College of Music, where his studies were interrupted by the First World War. It was whilst serving on the Western Front that he received head injuries which were to affect him for the rest of his life., both physically and mentally. After the War, he studied privately with John Ireland, and developed a life-long friendship with the composer Philip Heseltine (Peter Warlock). He married the English cellist Piers Coetmore. He gradually lapsed into a life of drink and died in 1950, falling from a pier into water as a result of a cerebral haemorrhage and heart attack.

Being best known for his Symphony in G minor, the cello concerto was written in 1945. His cellist wife inspired both the composition of this work and the cello sonata. I came to this CD without having heard this cello concerto before, knowing only his wonderful symphony. So I do not have another recording of the work to compare it with, though I do know of at least two other recordings of the work. For those who have never heard this beautiful concerto, I would urge them to investigate. It is a very English sounding work, with traces and echos of Vaughan Williams, Walton and even Delius. There is a beautiful lyrical slow movement, which is akin to an elegy. Nostalgia and wistfulness pervade the first two movements. The third movement is an allegretto with an Irish folk spirit. I cannot understand the relative neglect of this work; it should be performed more often and become part of the cello mainstream repertoire.
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