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Modern Dance Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, Import

4.8 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

Price: £7.40 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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£7.40 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by Fulfillment Express and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Pere Ubu Store


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Total price: £23.43
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Product details

  • Audio CD (2 Jun. 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Imports
  • ASIN: B000007OSV
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 109,472 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Nonalignment Pact
  2. The Modern Dance
  3. Laughing
  4. Street Waves
  5. Chinese Radiation
  6. Life Stinks
  7. Real World
  8. Over My Head
  9. Sentimental Journey
  10. Humor Me

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

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Format: Audio CD
Pere Ubu's 'The Modern Dance' is not technically a debut LP, coming on the back of several singles collected on both 'Datapanik in the Year Zero' & 'Terminal Tower' and following an album's worth of material released as Rocket from the Tombs (much bootlegged these have since been released). It came from Cleveland and was headed by David Thomas, a sometime music journalist with a fixation on Captain Beefheart's 'Trout Mask Replica' & Frank Zappa's 'Uncle Meat' - suggesting Beefheart should be cited when discussing TMD (Beefheart's track 'Clear Spot' set the angular tone for Television & Wire; while 'I Love You Big Dummy' most definitely predicts Ubu! The reviewer who objected to Beefheart comparisons for Ubu was just wrong. Does he not hear the demented sax on 'Laughing' and wonder if there's a connection between Don Van Vliet & David Thomas?).
Rocket from the Tombs were punk-before-punk and had Sid Vicious-before Sid Vicious with Peter Laughner - who would be booted out of Ubu shortly after those early singles '30 Seconds Over Tokyo' & 'Final Solution.' The rest of the Tombs became The Dead Boys, while the other more intellectual, more Beefheartian half named themselves after Alfred Jarry's Ubu plays. Laughner's presence is only found here on the manic 'Life Stinks' where Thomas hollers lines like "Life stinks/I need a drink/I love The Kinks..." which is the closest to the RFTT era. Recorded in 1976/77 and eventually released in February 1978, 'The Modern Dance' showed a band already at their peak - the Thomas-Allen Ravenstine-Tony Maimone-Scott Krauss-&-Tom Herman line-up would deliver the equally great 'Dub Housing' soon after (before stepping sideways with 'New Picnic Time').
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Format: Audio CD
It's often said of certain records 'that without this, **** couldn't have happened', fill in the gap with whichever bunch of bands you like to add in.

In the case of Pere Ubu, you'd certainly be in the right area to use this as a cornerstone of reference for a whole bunch of bands from half of Brit pop to countless more experimental art rock bands, including Maximo Park and others.

Essentially what we have here is a son of The Velvet Underground crossed with perhaps Suicide, Can and others with a brilliant lyricist at the helm in the shape of David Thomas. He crafts a couple of relatively accessible tracks early on in the shape of Non Alignment Pact and The Modern Dance before heading off into more dense song structures and weird out tracks which leads me to comparisons with the mighty PIL's Metal Box.

All in all, it's an album that you'll need to spend some quality time with to appreciate it's depths, rather like wading into a forest of thorn strewn bushes knowing that at it's centre lies musical eden. A very tough journey, but once you're there, you'll forget the blistering you may have gone through on the way.

By the way, if you're after easy listening, you'll probably best not bother with this, but for serious muso's, press, purchase and wait for musical joy to arrive.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I heard this, and the second album 'Dub Housing', when they came out. And I bought them on vinyl. But this is a review of 'The Modern Dance'.

Yes's 'Close to the Edge' was released in 1972, Emerson, Lake and Palmer's first album came out in 1970, as did King Crimson's 'In the Court of the Crimson King'. And from this background of increasingly self-referential and self-regarding 'prog rock' came two classic albums - Patti Smith's 'Horses' (1975) and this - 'The Modern Dance' (1978).

What a huge breath of fresh air! I still vividly remember the first time I heard this album. I was working in a second-hand record shop in Hull and I put it on the shop system to have a listen. It almost cleared the place.

The first track - 'Nonalignment Pact' - starts with what sounds like feedback. Definitely a sign of things to come. The vocals kick in ('kick' probably is the best word) and we're off on a musical 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas' - sort of early Roxy Music on bad acid. Agonised synth squeals but still a really good beat, and a tune. Yes, you can nearly hum it.
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Format: Audio CD
One of the great opening shots in delivering a different vista composed entirely of taking rocks linear beaten to death structure, then taking a club hammer, smashing it into fragments and then leaving it to become brick dust, as they build something else composed entirely within the head, rather than emerging from any corporate diktat.

At the time, the late seventies, they were seen as akin to Devo, Fall, Residents, Tuxedomoon, where they still stand in the odd corner. The sound veers along to a punk snarl but has little in common with Sham and its moorlock style descendants. Far out of kilter the music is founded upon a bass and drums holding a structure in some of the compositions, allowing the rest of the ensemble to feed off each other - as David Thomas reaches into his netherworld to bring out his inner voice.

Streams of consciousness are then shaped into paeans of a fragmented vision that veers from sadness to ecstasy in bipolar celebration of hilarity. So to deconstruct the formal world, this album is part of trying to find the other world which lies beyond the one blandly constructed. It is not punk rock and it is not art, because it howls its tunes into a celebration of the odd, rather than try to become it.
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