Trade in your item
Get a £0.84
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Modern Cookery for Private Families (Classic Voices in Food) Hardcover – Illustrated, 4 Apr 2011


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Illustrated
"Please retry"
£3.86 £3.28
Paperback
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Trade In this Item for up to £0.84
Trade in Modern Cookery for Private Families (Classic Voices in Food) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.84, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Quadrille Publishing Ltd (4 April 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844009599
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844009596
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 5.6 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 73,693 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Eliza Acton's domestic masterpiece on cookery predates even the indefatigable Mrs Beeton, and many consider it to be the better book
--The Bookseller, February 18, 2011

True Foodies will love the Classic Voices in Food Series --Homes & Gardens, June 1, 2011

A jauntily retro orange and burgundy edition from Quadrille is a reminder of just how good Acton was
--Sunday Telegraph {Stella}, May 8, 2011

About the Author

Elizabeth 'Eliza' Acton (1799 -1859) was an English poet and cook. Elizabeth Ray studied at the London School of Economics and was a social worker in London and Kent for many years. Always interested in domestic and social history, she has written several cookery books and a biography of Alexis Soyer, as well as contributing to such magazines as Homes and Gardens and writing a food column for the Sunday Telegraph. She is the widow of the wine writer Cyril Ray, which whom she wrote Wine with Food.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Charliecat on 10 April 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Eliza Acton was born in 1799 - Modern Cookery for Private Families was published in 1845 and had an immediate and enduring success. Modern Cookery is a classic cookery book and Acton was, at all times, a practical cook. She often provides several versions of a dish - one economical or common (cheaper) and one `superlative' version if you really want to make a splash. A doorstop of a book it provided a Victorian housewife with everything she would need to instruct her cook or cook for herself.

In her 1855 preface Acton encourages economy and healthy eating and abhors waste. Much like some modern cooks do today she praises fresh, unadulterated food which actually gives quite a modern sound to her writing. She states that healthy eating is available to all and tries to encourage the right mode of cooking. Obviously there are a few things which need adjusting such as cooking times for vegetables - boiling peas for 25 minutes would more likely give you a form of mushy peas!

Modern Cookery is a brilliant piece of social history (she doesn't go into any sort of household management like Mrs Beeton because this is a straight-forward cookery book) and a really enjoyable read as well as being quite a useful cookery book (if you have a bit of time). There is a useful conversion chart at the front of the book for weights, volumes and oven temperatures which helps with some of the antiquated advice.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. A. Caton TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 10 April 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is fantastic. Apparently it was the source for a lot of Mrs Beeton's book, and the text here is the 1855 revision of the 1845 original (covered with what would appears to be a mid 1930's cloth cover style!). This book differs from a modern book in many ways... apart from the use of Imperial measurements (bushels? pecks?) Eliza was writing before the advent of Gas cookery, so there is a good deal of reference to the type of coal/wood (in one case paper... when cooking with "a conjuror") fire. Another mark of the text's age is an obsession with baking your own bread (with or without yeast).... because in 1845, good bread was hard to come by, with bakers using adulterated ingredients to maximise profit to the great detriment of the purchasers health. A list of the muck used to make ingredients go further at this time would make your hair curl.....
Eliza is extremely helpful in listing both the recipes (spelt "receipts" throughout) and observations as to what happened when the recipe was used... this could be done to great advantage in the present day! She is thorough in describing the BASICS. Know your building blocks! Build your foundations right (providing plain fare for a modest table) and you can then try the more advanced stuff. She even has a word for those who habitually work by guess in the realm of measurements; while acknowledging that some folks can "wing it" she points out that far more can't and that one should be very VERY familar with the appearance of the right quantities before dispensing with the scales.
I feel inspired by it; there is good sound advice for the amateur and practised cook here albeit preserved in a slightly archaic, Dickensian way of speaking. (after all, Oliver Twist was only 5 years in print whan this little tome appeared!
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. B. W. Haynes VINE VOICE on 30 Mar 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book gives an interesting overview of cooking in the past making compelling reading.

Written originally at the end of the life of Eliza, this newly edited copy opens the door on how things were done many years before the days of Mrs. Beeton. Obviously many of the receipts are not to todays taste, but many others are, in particular the delightfull bread and pudding receipts.

Here, I must own up to being a fan of Eliza for many years and having several copies of her writings and recipes, some taken from the original, but many that have been "brought up to date" and in the proccess losing the original strength of her writing.

Although having had this copy for only a few days it has led to some interesting cookery experiments in our home kitchen, mostly succesful, though interpreting some of the original instructions was not easy.

I find that avoiding any comparison with Mrs. Beeton, this book is an ideal companion for anyone who is serious about basic British cookery.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mal Page VINE VOICE on 1 April 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is a facsimile of the original publication and the binding reflects this. It is a sizeable tome with a nice vintage cloth cover and a ribbon bookmark.
I collect old cook books, both originals and reprints (whether 'modernised' or not) and this sits nicely in the collection as it is very comprehensive and provides an authentic voice from a bygone era. It is fascinating to see what has changed in cooking - we've phased out calves' foot jelly - and how much remains the same - we have always, it seems, strived for the perfect gravy. I was intrigued to note how often cayenne pepper and mace were used in everyday dishes and how flavoursome food had to be.
Be warned, however, that this is most definitely not the sort of book you should buy someone as their first foray into cooking. The volume is too big to lie flat on a worktop, the print is tiny and there are very few illustrations. Where pictures do appear they are black and white and more likely to be of the raw ingredients (a bowl of eggs or a live hare) than of the finished dish. Measurements are imperial and cooking temperatures imprecise (a 'medium heat' or 'gentle fire', for example).
If you already know what a 'receipt' or 'catsup' constitutes, and you read your cook books from cover to cover like a novel, then this is the book for you or a gift for a like-minded foodie friend. If, however, you expect full page colour photos of the finished dish, weigh your ingredients to the gram and demand nano-second precise cooking times, for the sake of your nerves give this one a miss!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback